Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!

Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Halifax Explosion 1917 On December 6, 1917 two ships collided in the harbour at Halifax, Nova Scotia and caught fire. One was laden with tons of explosives and munitions for the First World War. Ninety minutes later the munitions ship exploded, killing 1,900 people. It was history's largest man-made explosion until the invention of atomic bombs. (This amateur video was created as a school project. Please excuse the typos contained in the video's text.)
Tags: Halifax  explosion 
Added: 7th June 2008
Views: 1157
Posted By: Lava1964
Halifax Explosion On December 6th of 1917, the worst pre atom bomb explosion in history occured in Halifax NS. Two ships, the Imo, and munitions ship the Mont Blanc collided in the Halifax harbor, and within 10 minutes, the Mont Blanc was ablaze, and the explosion took place about 25 minutes after that, at approx. 9:05 AM. The top picture was taken about 15 to 20 seconds after the blast from 21 kilometers away, The bottom picture is 2 days following the devastation, with the Imo shipwrecked in the harbor about mid picture. It is estimated about 2000 lives were lost, and without the help of train dispatcher Vince Coleman, who lost his life in the blast, more would have died as a passenger train from here in Saint John was expected to arrive in Halifax momentarily. Mr. Coleman sent a warning via Morse Code stating, "Stop trains. Munitions ship on fire. Approaching Pier 6. Goodbye",and would not stop until he recieved a message back from the train. Mr. Coleman saved about 300 lives, but lost his own due to his heroism.
Tags: halifax  explosion  1917 
Added: 15th April 2009
Views: 1214
Posted By: nbmike
Kilroy Was Here During the Second World War, the odd phrase "Kilroy Was Here" began appearing on American military ships. Alongside the phrase was often a cartoon figure of a man with a huge nose peering over a wall. It was not until the war ended that the origin of the quirky character was known. James Kilroy was an inspector at a shipbuilding company in Halifax, MA. His job was to count the rivets used in each piece of work and make a checkmark with a wax pencil near the finished rivets. The riveters were paid for each rivet, so often unscrupulous ones would erase Kilroy's checkmarks in the hope that their work would be counted twice. To thwart this type of underhandedness, Kilroy began using the cartoon figure with the three-word phrase instead of a checkmark. No riveter ever tried to remove the artwork. Kilroy was supposed to remove it before the ships left the shipyard, but often he did not get the chance to do so. Thus, ships bearing the strange phrase and artwork headed into service. "Kilroy Was Here" became a catchphrase that was universally adopted throughout every American theater of war. It became fashionable to write it in strange places as an indication that the US military was omnipresent. It was often left behind by espionage agents and advance parties prior to mass invasions. According to one story, it was written inside the latrine used by Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill during the historic Yalta Conference in 1945. The phrase has endured for more than 70 years. It was written on the wall of the compound where Osama Bin Laden was hiding out.
Tags: Kilroy  Was  Here  WWII 
Added: 7th December 2014
Views: 1490
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random