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1960 World Series Kinescope Found In September 2010, baseball fans were thrilled by a remarkable dicovery: A complete kinescope copy of the seventh game of the 1960 World Series was found in Bing Crosby's wine cellar! How a near pristine black-and-white reel of the entire television broadcast of the deciding game of the 1960 World Series — long believed to be lost forever — came to rest in the wine cellar of Bing Crosby’s home near San Francisco is not a mystery to those who knew him. Crosby loved baseball, but as a part owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates he was too nervous to watch the World Series against the New York Yankees, so he and his wife went to Paris, where they listened by radio. “He said, ‘I can’t stay in the country,’ ” his widow, Kathryn Crosby, recalled. “ ‘I’ll jinx everybody.’ ” He knew he would want to watch the game later — if his Pirates won — so he hired a company to record Game Seven by kinescope, an early relative of the DVR, filming off a television monitor. The five-reel set is the only known complete copy of the game, in which Pirates second baseman Bill Mazeroski famously hit a game-ending home run to beat the Yankees 10-9 at Forbes Field. It is considered one of the greatest and most memorable ballgames ever played. Crosby apparently had more foresight than the television networks and stations, which sadly erased or discarded nearly all the Major League Baseball games they carried until the 1970s. A canny preservationist of all things, Crosby, who died in 1977, kept a half-century’s worth of records, tapes and films in the wine cellar-turned-vault in his Hillsborough, California home. “Bing Crosby was way ahead of his time,” said Nick Trotta, senior library and licensing manager for Major League Baseball Productions, the sport’s archivist. The kinescope was found quite by accident. A producer searching through Crosby's estate for material for a TV documentary on the late singer's career accidentally came upon five film cannisters marked '1960 World Series.' The 50-year-old game was first shown to a private audience in Pittsburgh that included surviving members of both teams. It was broadcast on the MLB Network in December 2010 and has since been made available to the general public on DVD.
Tags: 1960  World  Series  baseball  Bing  Crosby 
Added: 13th August 2011
Views: 1751
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Posted By: Lava1964
Buckwheat Hoax 1990 ABC News found itself in an embarrassing position in 1990. Acting on a viewer's tip, 20/20, ABC's weekly news magazine, aired a "Where are they now?" segment about former Our Gang member Buckwheat. The story claimed that Buckwheat, whose real name was Bill English, was modestly employed as a grocery bagger at a Tempe, AZ supermarket. Immediately following the broadcast, dozens of Our Gang fans called ABC to tell the network they had been duped by an imposter. The real Buckwheat was named Billie Thomas--and he had died of a heart attack in 1980. Among the whistle-blowers was Our Gang alumnus Spanky McFarland who had worked alongside Thomas from 1934 until 1942. (Buckwheat stayed with the series until its conclusion in 1944.) Shortly after the hoax was exposed, a reporter from A Current Event interviewed McFarland via satellite from his home in Dallas while simultaneously interviewing English via satellite from Tempe. English came across as mumbling, evasive, incoherent, and thoroughly unconvincing. Moreover, English claimed to be the "first Buckwheat"--even though there was only one. The fallout of the debacle was that Lynn Murray, the producer of the 20/20 segment, was fired for doing inadequate research. Thomas's son sued ABC for damages. Hugh Downs issued an on-air apology on the following 20/20 broadcast. ABC News released a half-hearted, semi-apologetic media statement describing the situation as awkward "because English truly believes he is Buckwheat." English went to his grave in November 1994 still maintaining he was Buckwheat.
Tags: Buckwheat  hoax  Our  Gang  ABC  20/20 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 2687
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nick Ashford Passes at age 70--Ashford and Simpson - Solid NEW YORK (AP) – Nick Ashford, one-half of the legendary Motown songwriting duo Ashford & Simpson, has died at age 70. His longtime friend and former publicist Liz Rosenberg told the Associated Press that Ashford — who along with wife Valerie Simpson wrote some of Motown's biggest hits — died Monday in a New York City hospital. He had been suffering from throat cancer and had undergone radiation treatment.
Tags: Nick  Ashford,  Ashford,  Ashford  and  Simpson,  Obituary,  Death,  Solid  As  A  Rock,  Disco 
Added: 22nd August 2011
Views: 949
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Posted By: Old Fart
Hot L Baltimore - Sitcom Flop 1975 ABC had high hopes when its risque and controversial sitcom Hot L Baltimore debuted in 1975. Ultimately, though, the show never captured the hearts of TV viewers and was summarily axed less than five months into its run. The show, based on a successful off-Broadway play, took place in the rundown Hotel Baltimore in Baltimore, MD. It drew its title from the cheap establishment's neon marquee, which had a burned-out letter "e" that had never been replaced. The half-hour series premiered on January 24, 1975 and was produced by Norman Lear for ABC. (It was, in fact, the first Lear property to air on ABC.) The cast included Conchata Ferrell, James Cromwell, Richard Masur, Al Freeman, Jr., Gloria LeRoy, Jeannie Linero, and Charlotte Rae. The show's plots focused on the lives of the odd assemblage of disparate characters who called the seedy hotel home. The series had several controversial elements, including two primary characters who were prostitutes--one of whom was an illegal immigrant--and one of the first gay couples to be depicted on an American television series. Because of its storylines, Hot L Baltimore was the first network television show to have a warning during its opening, cautioning viewers about mature themes. ABC gave Hot L Baltimore a full publicity campaign, but it failed to win an audience and was canceled after just 13 episodes; its last telecast was June 6, 1975. This series is notable as the first failure for producer Norman Lear after a very successful streak of mega-hit TV series beginning with All in the Family in 1971 and continuing with Sanford and Son, Maude, Good Times, and The Jeffersons, among others.
Tags: Hot  L  Baltimore  sitcom  flop  Norman  Lear  ABC 
Added: 29th August 2011
Views: 3121
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseballs Lost Teams This is an informative short feature about three MLB teams that were in existence for half a century but found new homes in the 1950s: the St. Louis Browns, the Boston Braves, and the Philadelphia Athletics.
Tags: MLB  lost  teams  defunct 
Added: 2nd January 2014
Views: 1349
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Posted By: Lava1964
Johnnie Ray 1927-1990 Johnnie Ray is almost forgotten today, but he was a huge singing star in the early 1950s. At the peak of his career, Ray's income was $35,000 a week. Born in Oregon in 1927, Ray had top 40 hits until 1957. Despite being skinny, pigeon-toed, half-deaf and effeminate, this highly emotional performer was the most popular male singer of the pre-Elvis Presely era. Indeed, when Elvis first started out, he was often introduced on stage as "the new Johnnie Ray". Known as "the Prince of Wails" for his distinctive singing style, Ray is mostly remembered for his lip-quivering early 1950s hits such as Cry; Please, Mr Sun; and The Little White Cloud That Cried. His live performances, in which he sometimes played the piano, were wildly unpredictable. It was not uncommon for Ray to break into tears or flop to the stage floor while belting out a tune. His 1954 recording of Such A Night was the first chart hit to be banned by the BBC for its "suggestive" lyrics. Several American radio stations followed suit. Nevertheless, it still ended up topping the British charts. Ray had an interesting personal life: He became deaf in his right ear at age 13 after an accident at a Boy Scout camp and prominently wore a large hearing aid for the rest of his life. He was twice arrested in Detroit for soliciting sex from men. The first arrest was in 1951 just before he became famous. (He quietly pled guilty and paid a fine.) The second arrest was in 1959, but he was acquitted by an all-female jury. He is rumored to have had a long affair with newspaper writer Dorothy Kilgallen (of What's My Line? fame) that began after his first of two mystery guest appearances on the show. Ray was a heavy drinker who was hospitalized for alcoholism in 1960. He died in 1990, at age 63, from liver disease.
Tags: Johnnie  Ray  singer 
Added: 17th January 2012
Views: 4431
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Posted By: Lava1964
Brittanie Cecil - Hockey Fan Fatality At any high-quality hockey game, pucks flying into the crowd at great speeds are a common occurrence. Injuries to fans occasionally happen. Only once in the long history of the NHL has a spectator been killed as a result of being struck by a puck. The victim was Brittanie Cecil, who ironically had been given her ticket to the game as an early 14th birthday present. Brittanie, an athletic girl from West Alexandria, OH, was watching the Columbus Blue Jackets play the Calgary Flames at Columbus' Nationwide Arena on March 16, 2002. A slapshot by the Blue Jackets' Espen Knutsen was deflected by the Flames' Derek Morris. It went over the glass behind the net, striking Brittanie in the left temple. Play carried on as the players were unaware of having inadvertently caused any serious injury. Although Brittanie had suffered a skull fracture, she walked on her own power to a first-aid station before being taken to Columbus Children's Hospital in an ambulance. Her only visible injury was a gash on her forehead. At the hospital, she suffered an initial seizure and was admitted, but the next day she appeared to be recovering. Brittanie was both communicative and ambulatory, and had no complaints of pain or dizziness. A CT-scan, however, had failed to catch a torn vertebral artery, resulting in severe clotting and swelling of the brain. On March 18, she developed a high fever and lost consciousness. She died nearly 48 hours after being struck, at 5:15 p.m. on March 18, 2002, two days before her 14th birthday. Brittanie's funeral cortege drew a procession of more than 150 cars. Attending the service was Blue Jackets' general manager Doug MacLean who spoke on behalf of the team. Knutsen and Morris, the two players who combined for the fatal slapshot, expressed remorse following Brittanie's death. Morris, who deflected the puck, explained, "You try to say, 'It happens all the time,' but you can't. I don't know how many times pucks get deflected over the glass, but it doesn't make it any better. You can always say, 'It's not my fault,' but you always feel like it is, a little." Knutsen was given the option of sitting out the next game by Blue Jackets coach Dave King. He chose to play, telling reporters, "I think about it all the time. It was a terrible accident, and I cannot get it off my mind." Knutsen was so shaken by what had happened that he could not handle meeting Brittanie's family until 2010--eight years after the accident. The following season, the NHL mandated that safety netting be installed in every arena to protect spectators seated behind the goal nets. This move was initially greeted with hostility by longtime hockey fans who didn't want their view of games obstructed and who further perceived the netting as an overreaction to a freak accident.
Tags: accident  hockey  fan  puck  Brittanie  Cecil 
Added: 6th April 2012
Views: 1377
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marion Lorne - Aunt Clara Even though Marion Lorne had five decades of stage work on her resume, she didn't become widely famous as an actress until the last few years of her life. Her occasional role as the befuddled, forgetful, and utterly lovable Aunt Clara on the sitcom Bewitched made her a TV favorite. In her episodes on the show, Clara (who was one of Samantha Stevens' relatives, and thus a witch) would unintentionally cause chaos in the Stevens household with her inability to control her spell-casting powers. Lorne was awarded a well deserved Emmy for her role in 1968. Sadly, the award came posthumusly; she had died of a heart attack at age 82 a few weeks earlier. Elizabeth Montgomery accepted the Emmy on Lorne's behalf.
Tags: Bewitched  Marion  Lorne 
Added: 27th April 2012
Views: 2287
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gene Stephens 3-Hit Inning On June 18, 1953, 20-year-old Gene Stephens collected three hits in one inning for the Boston Red Sox during a 23-3 victory over the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park. The Bosox exploded for 17 runs in the seventh inning - sending 23 batters to the plate during their 47-minute half of the frame. Stephens had a double and two singles off three different Detroit pitchers. The 17 runs scored by Boston in that inning were two more than the previous modern MLB record, set by the Brooklyn Dodgers in a May 21, 1952, contest against the Cincinnati Reds. The Red Sox had 14 hits in their memorable inning to set a new modern MLB mark in that category. Gene Stephens was mostly a reserve player in his 12 MLB seasons. His batting average was only .204 in 1953, making his three-hit inning on June 18 even more surprising. The Red Sox led 5-3 going into their half of the seventh inning. Detroit pitcher Steve Gromek allowed nine of the 17 runs while Dick Weik and Earl Harrist each allowed four. Boston had 27 total hits in the game. The day before, they had 20 hits when they walloped Detroit 17-1. “I was the youngest ballplayer in the major leagues at the time,” Stephens recalled years later, whose three-hit performance was witnessed by only 3,108 Fenway fans that afternoon. “I probably shouldn’t have even been in the major leagues at that time. Ted Williams had gone to the Korean War and, therefore, that gave me the opportunity to play. As soon as [Williams] came back, the Red Sox optioned me down to their AAA team in Louisville." The all-time record for most runs scored in an inning is 18, set by the Chicago White Stockings against the Detroit Wolverines on Sept. 6, 1883, in a National League affair. During that onslaught (also in the seventh inning), three different Chicago players had three hits in the frame: Tommy Burns (two doubles, one home run), Fred Pfeffer (two singles, one double), and Ned Williamson (two singles, one double). The only other hitter in modern MLB history (since 1900) with three hits in one inning was Johnny Damon, who was also a member of the Boston Red Sox. Damon achieved his feat when Boston whipped the Florida Marlins 25-8 on June 27, 2003. Damon collected three hits (a single, double, and triple) in the first inning as the Bosox scored a record 10 runs before any Boston batter was put out.
Tags: baseball  Gene  Stephens  hits  Red  Sox 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 1837
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Posted By: Lava1964
Aberfan Disaster - 1966 At 9.15 am on Friday, October 21, 1966 a enormous mountain of excavated coal mining debris (known to coal miners as a waste tip) slid down a mountainside into the mining village of Aberfan, near Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. The waste tips, which had been building up for 50 years, had become heavy and saturated due to a week of rainy weather. The debris slide first destroyed a farm cottage in its path, killing all the occupants. At Pantglas Junior School, just below, the children had just returned to their classes after singing All Things Bright and Beautiful at their assembly. The tipping gang up the mountain had seen the slide start, but could not raise the alarm because their telephone cable had been repeatedly stolen. (The Tribunal of Inquiry later established that the disaster happened so quickly that a telephone warning would not have saved any lives regardless.) Down in the village, nobody saw anything, but everybody heard the noise as about 40,000 cubic metres of debris crashed into the school at a depth of 39 feet. Gaynor Minett, an eight-year-old student, remembered four years later, "It was a tremendous rumbling sound and all the school went dead. You could hear a pin drop. Everyone just froze in their seats. I just managed to get up and I reached the end of my desk when the sound got louder and nearer, until I could see the black out of the window. I can't remember any more but I woke up to find that a horrible nightmare had just begun in front of my eyes." The slide engulfed the school and about 20 houses in the village before coming to rest. Then there was total silence. George Williams, who was trapped in the wreckage, remembered that "In that silence you couldn't hear a bird or a child." All able-bodied persons in the village rushed to the scene with whatever implements they could find to begin digging through the mess to search for survivors. None were found after 11 a.m., but it took nearly a week to recover all the bodies. The death toll in the Aberfan disaster was 144--of which 116 were school children. That accounted for about half the school's enrolment. Five teachers were killed too. An inquiry later blamed the National Coal Board (NCB) for ignoring warnings from years earlier about the potential hazards of the growing waste tips. Families of the victims were eventually compensated 500 British pounds by the NCB for each loved one who had perished.
Tags: Aberfan  Wales  disaster  coal 
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 2387
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Posted By: Lava1964

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