Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
1942 Coca-Cola Ad Coca-Cola ad from 1942. Great graphics. Too bad it didn’t say, ‘This Coke’s for you!’ When a nickel was worth something! It’s still Delicious and Refreshing… Just takes a few more nickels.
Tags: coca  cola  ad  classic  bottle  coke 
Added: 19th August 2007
Views: 3233
Rating:
Posted By: jimmyjet
Timex Sinclair 1000 Computer Back in 1982 the Timex Corp. and Sinclair research (of Britain,) teamed up and produced the Timex Sinclair 1000. It was a low-priced introduction to home computers. It sported 2K of onboard RAM, (yes, 2K! 2 kilobytes of memory!) You could also purchase a 16K add-on memory module called a RAM Pack, (lower right in the picture,) which increased the memory to 18K. I believe there was also a 64K RAM Pack available later. The ones sold in Britain were known as the ZX 81. It had no display but you could hook it up to the VHF antenna connections on the back of your television set. It also didn't have any sound. The operating system was a modified version of the BASIC computer language and it gave a lot of people, including me, their first taste of computer programming. There were a number of programs that you could buy for it. They were all on cassette tapes. What you would do is connect the unit to your TV set, plug your cassette tape player into it and put whatever program you might have into the tape player. You had to turn the volume off on your cassette player because the programming code was just one continual screeching sound. I had a cassette tape that had a few different programs on it. All of the characters in the programs were block-headed type graphics, but they actually would walk across the screen and even jump up and down. Cool stuff back then. I remember this costing me $29, as the store I bought it at was getting rid of them. I believe the original selling price was $99. I also bought the 16K RAM Pack for $25. I've kept it all these years in good condition thinking that someday it would be worth something, and I was right. They're selling for about 10 bucks on eBay! Win a few, lose a few. Ironically, these things have somewhat of a cult following, and I've even heard of clubs dedicated to the TS-1000!
Tags: timex  sinclair  ts1000  computer 
Added: 4th September 2007
Views: 2181
Rating:
Posted By: jimmyjet
Worlds Costliest  Ad     After 606 Takes And you thought those people that set up a room full of dominos to knock over were amazing... believe it or not, just unbelievable!! When the ad was pitched to senior executives, they signed off on it immediately without any hesitation, including the costs. There are six, and only six, hand-made Honda Accords in the world. To the horror of Honda engineers, the filmmakers disassembled two of them to make this film. There are no computer graphics or digital tricks in the film. Everything you see really happened in real time, exactly as you see it. The film took 606 takes. On the first 605 takes, something, usually very minor, didn't work. They would then have to set the whole thing up again. The crew spent weeks shooting night and day. The film cost six million dollars and took three months to complete including full engineering of the sequence. In addition, it is two minutes long so every time Honda airs the film on British television, they're shelling out enough dough to keep any one of us in clover for a lifetime. Everything you see in the film (aside from the walls, floor, ramp and complete Honda Accord) are parts from those two cars. And how about those funky windshield wipers...?? At a cost of $6.2 million for 90-sec commercial, this is the world's costliest ad and hands down winner in the world of ads.
Tags: honda  accord  advertising  campaigns 
Added: 19th October 2007
Views: 87808
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Hockey Night in Canada titles from a 1981 Stanley Cup match comes the titles n' classic theme tune for CBC's HOCKEY NIGHT IN CANADA. Generations of hockey fans were instantly invigorated by the opening notes of the theme, up until CBC opted not to pay the requested royalties and go for an entirely new piece of music. Rival network CTV subsequently snapped up the rights to the original theme.
Tags: hockey  night  in  Canada  theme  music  song  bumper  graphics  sports  1980s  1981  1970s 
Added: 1st July 2009
Views: 1409
Rating:
Posted By: robatsea
Movie Channel Graphics 1980 Here are some graphics from The Movie Channel, taped in 1980.
Tags: The  Movie  Channel  graphics  1980  Ray  Glasser 
Added: 7th June 2008
Views: 1309
Rating:
Posted By: videoholic
1977 Promo for the Cross Wits From 1977, here is a Cross-Wits Promo, plus some ABC graphics, as taped from WEWS-TV5, Cleveland.
Tags: Cross-Wits  Promo  1977    Ray  Glasser 
Added: 4th October 2008
Views: 838
Rating:
Posted By: videoholic
Not  A Math Wiz on Millionaire When Who Wants To Be A Millionaire first hit the airwaves, there was a qualification procedure that ensured the dummies got sifted out. Behold the result when they got rid of the qualifying process in favor of demographics. Geez...
Tags: Millionaire  math  game  show 
Added: 28th January 2009
Views: 878
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Final Ed Sullivan Show - 1971 The Ed Sullivan Show (called The Toast of the Town until 1955) debuted on CBS on June 20, 1948. The first season it aired live on Sundays from 9 to 10 p.m. For the next 22 years it aired on Sundays from 8 to 9 p.m. and became a television staple and a cultural institution. Fondly remembered, The Ed Sullivan Show is arguably the most important entertainment program in television history as it showcased the world's best singers, dancers, actors, musicians, magicians, circus acts, and comedians. (Many classic Broadway performances exist today solely because they were preserved on The Ed Sullivan Show.) Despite Ed's obvious shortcomings as a television host--he was extremely "wooden" as an emcee--the appeal of the show was that it provided something for everybody. One critic aptly declared, "Ed Sullivan can't sing, dance or tell jokes--but he knows who can!" By 1971 The Ed Sullivan Show was in decline, however. Ratings were still generally good, but the all-important demographics showed that younger viewers were no longer watching in sizable numbers. Accordingly CBS unceremoniously applied the ax. The last live show aired on Sunday, March 28, 1971. The performers on that final Sunday were folk singer Melanie; singing duo Tony Sandler & Ralph Young; Danny Davis & the Nashville Brass; mezzo-soprano Joanna Simon; impressionist David Frye; comedian Joey Adams; comedy duo Norman Wisdom and Tony Fane; comedian Lennie Schultz; and sleight-of-hand artist Vic Perry. Sullivan, who hoped to extend his show to at least 25 seasons, had no inkling the March 28, 1971 broadcast would be the last show, so there was no grand finale or tearful farewell. Reruns continued through June 6, 1971. The Ed Sullivan Show was replaced by the CBS Sunday Evening Movie--which lasted just one season. From all accounts, the cancellation of the show deeply affected Sullivan's health and well being. He began exhibiting signs of senility. Paul McCartney recalled encountering Sullivan about a year after the show's cancellation and Sullivan had no idea who McCartney was. Joan Rivers had a similar experience. Sullivan died on October 13, 1974--which was a Sunday--just a few months after being diagnosed with advanced esophageal cancer. He was 73 years old.
Tags: Ed  Sullivan  Show  finale  1971 
Added: 27th February 2014
Views: 1816
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Announcerless Telecast - 1980 "We are just moments away from the kickoff of today's Jets-Dolphins game and a telecast that figures to be different. The fact that we try something different--and dare to--has been greeted with almost every kind of reaction, from good-natured humor to applause to some surprising anger." That's how NBC's Bryant Gumbel's introduced what was about to happen on Saturday, December 20, 1980: NBC was going to broadcast an entire NFL game from Miami's Orange Bowl with neither a play-by-play announcer nor an analyst. It was a meaningless, season-ending game for two mediocre NFL teams, but Don Ohlmeyer (pictured here) turned it into a happening. Ohlmeyer was the first producer of Monday Night Football. He produced and directed three Olympics, won 16 Emmy awards, and is a member of the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Based on his years of experience, Ohlmeyer always believed that sports announcers talked too much. Here was an attention-seeking vehicle that would drive that point home. Ohlmeyer also thought the gimmick might be a way to boost ratings points out of an otherwise unattractive matchup. Dick Enberg, who was one of NBC's lead football announcers at the time, was not amused. He was worried. "My first reaction was of incredible nervousness," he recalled. "We're paid to talk, so all of us want to fill the air with lots of exciting words. We all gathered together, hoping that Ohlmeyer was dead wrong. I mean, he was flirting with the rest of our lives. What if this crazy idea really worked?" The game, won by the New York Jets 24-17, featured only sounds that could be picked up by on-field microphones, the referee's calls, plus the usual announcements from the Orange Bowl's stadium announcer. To compensate for the absence of TV announcers, NBC went overboard on its graphics and pre-recorded soundbites of players and coaches. It was a onetime experiment that was largely mocked by TV critics. Surprisingly, though, comments received at NBC's switchboard were about 60% favorable.
Tags: NFL  NBC  announcerless  telecast  Don  Ohlmeyer 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 1664
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Whats My Line - Syndicated Years After a prime time run on CBS of more than 17 years (1950 to 1967), the popular panel show What's My Line? was resurrected by its creators as a syndicated program from 1968 to 1975. Beloved host John Daly was not interested in the hectic schedule of five shows per week (all done in one day), so Washington political reporter Wally Bruner was brought in as the new moderator. Classy Arlene Francis returned as a regular panelist. Bennett Cerf apppeared occasionally until his death in 1971. Soupy Sales became the regular male panelist. He proved to be an amusing and excellent game player who seemed to know every mystery guest no matter what field he/she happened to be in. The syndicated version was less refined than the CBS version. Games were deliberately shortened to allow the contestants to display their unusual occupations--something that almost never happened on the old version. Therefore if a contestant was a fire eater or a wine taster, there was invariably a demonstration of his/her talent. Bruner hosted WML for four years but admittedly was not fond of New York City nor the showbiz scene and was happy to bow out gracefully. Larry Blyden, best known as a Broadway actor, took over as moderator in 1972 for the show's last three seasons, and was much more comfortable hobnobbing with celebrities than Bruner was. Providing halfway decent mystery guests five shows per week proved to be a huge challenge. Executive producer Gil Fates charitably referred to some of the so-called celebrities as "owls" because often the studio audience and some of the panelists would quietly say "who?" when the mystery guest was not particularly famous. The final shows were taped just before Christmas in 1974 and aired throughout the spring of 1975. Towards the end, declining ratings and aging audience demographics made WML a tough sell to local TV stations. Blyden was slated to host Showoffs, another game show, when he was tragically killed in an auto accident while vacationing in Morocco in June 1975--which absolutely sealed the finish of WML. The syndicated WML simply faded away with none of the sentimental fanfare the CBS version had in its 1967 finale. In his book on the history of WML, Fates ruefully admits the last episode of the syndicated show was "a bomb." There have been no serious attempts to revive WML since 1975, although a retrospective program was made later that year--co-hosted by John Daly and Arlene Francis--to mark WML's 25 years on the air.
Tags: TV  syndicated  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 14th June 2012
Views: 1445
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random