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Missing Beaumont Children - 1966 This is one of the saddest stories I've ever come across: Australia's most famous abduction case. On January 26, 1966, three siblings under the age of 10 vanished from Glenelg Beach on Australia Day, the country's national summer holiday. To many Australians it is the day their country lost its innocence. The three Beaumont children -– Jane, nine; Arnna, seven; and Grant, four -- headed alone to the resort town of Glenelg Beach, a five-minute bus ride from their Adelaide home at about 10 a.m. Due back at 12 noon, their parents raised the alarm when they failed to return by 3:30 p.m. Several witnesses said the three Beaumont children had been spotted in the presence of a blond man at the beach. He was never identified and the children have not been sighted since. Their disappearance spawned one of the largest police investigations in Australian criminal history. Understandably, it forever changed parents' attitudes in Australia about how they supervised their youngsters. In all likelihood, the children, who had often traveled to the resort without their parents, had become friendly with their abductor in earlier visits to Glenelg Beach. After one such visit, Arnna told her mother that Jane "had a boyfriend" at the beach. The mother assumed Arnna was talking about another child--not an adult. On the morning the Beaumont children vanished, Jane bought some treats from a refreshment stand with a one-pound note. Her mother had only given Jane enough coins to cover the children's two-way bus fares. The case remains unsolved.
Tags: Australia  missing  children  Beaumont  abduction 
Added: 3rd June 2014
Views: 2179
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Posted By: Lava1964
Robert E Lee Citizenship Restored - 1975 When General Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to General U.S. Grant on April 9, 1865 to effectively end the Civil War, one of the terms of surrender was that Confederate soldiers would have their U.S. citizenships automatically restored. When Andrew Johnson became president following Abraham Lincoln's assassination, he changed the rules slightly. Fourteen special cases had to apply directly to the President to have their citizenships restored. One such case was Robert E. Lee. Lee wrote to President Johnson on June 13, saying in part: "Being excluded from the provisions of amnesty & pardon contained in the proclamation of the 29th Ulto; I hereby apply for the benefits, & full restoration of all rights & privileges extended to those included in its terms. I graduated at the Mil. Academy at West Point in June 1829. Resigned from the U.S. Army April '61. Was a General in the Confederate Army, & included in the surrender of the Army of N. Va. 9 April '65." Consequently, Lee was provided with an Amnesty Oath form, which he filled out, dated October 2, 1865--the same day he was sworn in as president of Washington College in Lexington, VA–-and sent the signed document to the nation's capital. Lee's application was received by Secretary of State William Seward who had no intention of following through with Lee's request. Lee died in 1870 without really knowing his citizenship status. A century passed. In 1970 Lee's application was found by chance by a National Archives clerk who was looking through old State Department files. Since Lee had made the proper application to restore his citizenship, there was no reason to deny it. After Congress made Lee's old application something of a special cause, President Gerald Ford formally restored Lee's citizenship at a ceremony at his former mansion in Arlington, VA on August 5, 1975. Among those on hand for the occasion was Lee's great-great-grandson R.E. Lee V.
Tags: Robert  E  Lee  citizenship  Gerald  Ford 
Added: 28th March 2014
Views: 1348
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Grant Memorial Resurfaces Eddie Grant was a Harvard-educated ballplayer who played for four MLB teams between 1906 and 1915. After his baseball career ended, Grant enlisted in the army during the First World War at age 34. He rose to the rank of captain. On October 5, 1918, a few weeks before the war ended, Grant was killed by enemy shell fire in the Argonne Forest. On Memorial Day 1921, the New York Giants, Grant's final MLB team, unveiled an enormous brass plaque that was handsomely mounted on a five-foot granite marker that sat in the deepest part of the Polo Grounds underneath the home team's clubhouse. From the memorial's dedication until the Giants abandoned New York and the Polo Grounds in 1957, a solemn wreath-laying ceremony was held at the Grant monument every year, usually between games of a Memorial Day doubleheader. At the conclusion of the final game played at the Polo Grounds on September 29, 1957, souvenir hunters mobbed the field. The New York Times reported that three teenagers were seen prying the bronze plaque off the monument. Rumors that the police ultimately recovered the plaque were never verified, and its whereabouts remained a mystery for nearly 42 years. In late July 1999, the Eddie Grant Memorial plaque was discovered in the attic of a home in Ho-Ho-Kus Township, NJ. It had been formerly owned by Lena and Gaetano Bucca. The new home owners, Brian and Deborah Lamb, came across the plaque carefully wrapped in a blanket and hidden under a trap door in the attic. Brian Lamb contacted Baseball Reliquary Board member, Wendy Brougalman, a former business associate, with news of the discovery. How did the 100-pound plaque end up in a New Jersey attic? The Lambs purchased the home from the Bucca family after the death of Lena Bucca in 1998. Gaetano Bucca, a former New York City police officer, died in 1974. Gaetano, who retired from the force in January 1958 and subsequently moved with his family to New Jersey, served in the city's 32nd precinct, an area of jurisdiction encompassing the Polo Grounds. It is assumed that that Officer Bucca and a few allies had arranged to take the plaque with the intention of delivering it to the Eddie Grant American Legion Post 1225 in the Bronx. The plaque never made it there. Benjamin Bucca, Gaetano's only surviving son and a respected probate attorney, had no knowledge at all of the 100-pound plaque situated just above his head in his former bedroom. "You know, I never felt comfortable in that bedroom," he said. "Now I know why! That thing could have fallen on my head in the middle of the night and flattened me. My Pop was always a bit of a mystery, but this . . . This is . . . What the hell was he thinking about?'"
Tags: Baseball  Eddie  Grant  Memorial  recovered 
Added: 8th October 2014
Views: 2408
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
American Gothic Tags:   Grant  Wood  American  Gothic    pitchfork  Nan  Wood  Dr.  Byron  McKeeby 
Added: 19th November 2014
Views: 910
Rating:
Posted By: Freckles
14-Year-old Finds Lincoln Death Photo American history buffs were startled in September 1952 when it was announced that a banned photo of Abraham Lincoln lying in his coffin was discovered by a 14-year-old boy. Robert Lincoln, the eldest son of the assassinated president, had forbade any post-mortem photography of his father. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton had zealously enforced Robert's wishes and destroyed several such photos and their negatives. Enter young Ron Rietveld of Des Moines, IA 80-plus years later. As a preteen Lincoln buff he had precociously begun corresponding with Judge James W. Bollinger, one of the country's leading collectors of Lincoln memorabilia. When Bollinger died in 1951, he left his collection to the University of Iowa. The 13-year-old Rietveld wrote to the university for permission to attend the dedication ceremony for Bollinger's collection. As a friend of Bollinger, Rietveld was granted VIP status. At the ceremony Rietveld befriended many of the great Lincoln historians of the era, including Henry Pratt. Pratt and his wife were so impressed by the teenager that they invited him to come to their Springfield, IL home to see Lincoln's tomb and visit the research library on the grounds. While there, Rietveld was given free rein to examine the archival material. Purely by chance, Rietveld began looking through papers sent by the son of Edwin Stanton. To his surprise, Rietveld found a photo (shown here) of Lincoln lying in state in an open coffin. It was taken on April 24, 1865 in New York City--meaning that Stanton had curiously kept one of the photos he was supposed to have destroyed. Rietveld recognized the scene from an artist's rendition that had appeared in Collier's magazine. Rietveld alerted Pratt to his find. Pratt suspected the photo was authentic, but he reserved judgement until it could be positively verified. Rietveld was sworn to secrecy. Not even his parents knew about his remarkable find until the story was front-page news in the Des Moines Register. As one might expect, Rietveld became a history professor himself.
Tags: Lincoln  post-mortem  photo  coffin  Ronald  Rietveld 
Added: 20th July 2015
Views: 1943
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ted Baxter Has Trouble With Bad News From the fifth season episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show titled "You Can't Lose 'Em All," Lou Grant (Ed Asner) has trouble informing Ted Baxter (Ted Knight) that he wasn't even nominated for a Teddy Award as best newscaster in Minneapolis because he knows how Ted will react.
Tags: Ted  Baxter  Mary  Tyler  Moore  Show  Lou  Grant  Ed  Asner  sitcom 
Added: 3rd November 2015
Views: 905
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Posted By: Lava1964
Iconic Depression-Era Photo Thirty-two-year-old Florence Owens Thomson became the face of the Great Depression after she was photographed by Dorothea Lange in 1936. Lange, a photographer of some repute, had been hired by the federal government to capture images of how the hard times of the 1930 were affecting Americans. The photo--which Lange titled "Migrant Mother"--did not identify Thompson by name, only that she was a 32-year-old widowed mother of seven children who was among at least 2,500 transient and destitute people seeking menial work as a pea picker in a California camp. The compelling photo was widely reproduced in newspapers across the continent and Thompson was subsequently identified. She died in 1983 at age 80.
Tags: Depression  photo  Florence  Owens  Thompson  Dorothea  Lange 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 777
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Posted By: Lava1964
Greg Maddux HOF plaque Fails Grammar Test Greg Maddux was one of baseball's greatest pitchers. He is undoubtedly worthy of being inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. However, when his plaque was unveiled at the 2014 induction ceremony, grammarians gasped at a flagrant error in he inscription. His plaque states Maddux had "less than 1,000 walks" in his illustrious career. Because walks is a plural noun, the plaque should have read "fewer than 1,000 walks..."
Tags: Greg  Maddux  Hall  of  Fame  plaque  error. 
Added: 22nd May 2017
Views: 961
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Partridge Family - My Heart Belongs To A Two-Car Garage (Debbie Sims Version) with Arte Johnson P1 Written by William S. Bickley Produced by Larry Rosen Directed by Jerry London Original Air Date: February 4, 1972 The Partridge family awakes one morning to find they have an unexpected visitor: Russian immigrant Nicholas Minsky Pushkin, or, as he is otherwise know, Pushkin the Magnificent. Nicholas is a jack-of-all-trades: master chef, master carpenter, master artist, etc. Nicholas has decided to offer his services to a typical middle-class American family and the Partridges are that lucky family. The family likes Nicholas well enough but he seems to break as many things as he fixes. In his sincere desire to be helpful, Nicholas paints the garage door while the Partridges are away on a concert date. It may sound innocent, but Pushkin the Magnificent has painted a scantily-clad young lady on the garage door and although Nicholas is an accomplished artist, the location of the work is a cause for much embarrassment, and the neighbors are in an uproar. As it turns out, Nicholas may not be the greatest of carpenters, but he is a recognized artist. The local museum purchases the garage door for a large sum so Shirley is able to buy a new garage door and Pushkin is able to take a vacation with the remaining money. Song: "Last Night," music and lyrics by Wes Farrell & Tony Romeo (on Shopping Bag)
Tags: The  Partridge  Family 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 547
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace
The Partridge Family - My Heart Belongs To A Two-Car Garage (Debbie Sims Version) with Arte Johnson P2 Written by William S. Bickley Produced by Larry Rosen Directed by Jerry London Original Air Date: February 4, 1972 The Partridge family awakes one morning to find they have an unexpected visitor: Russian immigrant Nicholas Minsky Pushkin, or, as he is otherwise know, Pushkin the Magnificent. Nicholas is a jack-of-all-trades: master chef, master carpenter, master artist, etc. Nicholas has decided to offer his services to a typical middle-class American family and the Partridges are that lucky family. The family likes Nicholas well enough but he seems to break as many things as he fixes. In his sincere desire to be helpful, Nicholas paints the garage door while the Partridges are away on a concert date. It may sound innocent, but Pushkin the Magnificent has painted a scantily-clad young lady on the garage door and although Nicholas is an accomplished artist, the location of the work is a cause for much embarrassment, and the neighbors are in an uproar. As it turns out, Nicholas may not be the greatest of carpenters, but he is a recognized artist. The local museum purchases the garage door for a large sum so Shirley is able to buy a new garage door and Pushkin is able to take a vacation with the remaining money. Song: "Last Night," music and lyrics by Wes Farrell & Tony Romeo (on Shopping Bag) Category
Tags: The  Partridge  Family,  70s 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 525
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace

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