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Ruth Etting This Photo of Ruth Etting was taken by Alfred Cheney Johnston, the official photographer of the Ziegfeld Follies and was taken in 1923. Ruth Etting (November 23, 1896 September 24, 1978) was an American singing star of the 1930s, who had over sixty hit recordings . . . as well as a quite colorful life: In 1937 she fell in love with her pianist, Myrl Alderman, who was consequently shot by her husband, Moe Snyder but survived. Snyder was jailed for the assault, and Etting divorced him on November 30, 1937. She married Alderman in December 1938, but the scandal effectively ended her career. . . today, she would just be MORE famous . .
Tags: glamour  photo  ruth  etting  singer  ziegfeld  follies  actress  roman  scandals  giftsof  gab  hips  hips  hooray 
Added: 16th August 2007
Views: 2959
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Posted By: Teresa
Easter Eggs Symbolize New Life Of all the symbols associated with Easter, the egg, the symbol of fertility and new life, is the most identifiable. The customs and traditions of using eggs have been associated with Easter for centuries. Originally Easter eggs were painted with bright colors to represent the sunlight of spring and were used in Easter-egg rolling contests or given as gifts. After they were colored and etched with various designs the eggs were exchanged by lovers and romantic admirers, much the same as valentines. In medieval time eggs were traditionally given at Easter to the servants. In Germany eggs were given to children along with other Easter gifts. Different cultures have developed their own ways of decorating Easter eggs. Crimson eggs, to honor the blood of Christ, are exchanged in Greece. In parts of Germany and Austria green eggs are used on Maundy Thursday (Holy Thursday). The Slavic people decorate their eggs in special patterns of gold and silver. In Germany and other countries eggs used for cooking where not broken, but the contents were removed by piercing the end of each egg with a needle and blowing the contents into a bowl. The hollow eggs were dyed and hung from shrubs and trees during the Easter Week. The Armenians would decorate hollow eggs with pictures of Christ, the Virgin Mary, and other religious designs. At the Jewish Passover Seder, a hard-boiled egg dipped in salt water symbolizes both new life and the Passover sacrifice offered at the Temple in Jerusalem.
Tags: easter  eggs  origins  of  the  tradition 
Added: 22nd March 2008
Views: 1491
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Posted By: Naomi
Christmas Truce 1914 One of the most remarkable incidents in history was the impromptu truce that took place on the Western Front on Christmas Day 1914. Beginning late on Christmas Eve, the entrenched British and German troops began serenading each other with songs and carols. By the next day a full truce was on, with soldiers and officers from both sides fraternizing and exchanging gifts. There was even an international soccer match played with teams comprised of warring soldiers. On December 26, 1914 the First World War started again. How sad. Ninety-four years later, in 2008, soldiers from the same opposing regiments reenacted the famous Christmas Truce in the same location.
Tags: First  World  War  Christmas  Truce 
Added: 10th May 2009
Views: 7882
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boxing Day - Commonwealth Nations From Wiki: Boxing Day was traditionally a day on which the servants had a day off from their duties. Because of this the gentry would eat cold cuts and have a buffet-style feast prepared by the servants in advance. In modern times many families will still follow this tradition by eating a family-style buffet lunch, with cold cuts rather than a full cooked meal. It is a time for family, parlour games and sports in the UK. The traditional recorded celebration of Boxing Day has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era; metal boxes were placed outside churches used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen. In the United Kingdom it certainly became a custom of the nineteenth century Victorians for tradesmen to collect their "Christmas boxes" or gifts in return for good and reliable service throughout the year on the day after Christmas. However, the exact etymology of the term "Boxing" is unclear, with several competing theories, none of which is definitively true. Another possibility is that the name derives from an old English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food). In addition, around the 1800's, churches opened their alms boxes (boxes where people place monetary donations) and distributed the contents to the poor. The establishment of Boxing Day as a defined public holiday under the legislation that created the UK's Bank Holidays started the separation of 'Boxing Day' from the 'Feast of St Stephen', and today it is almost entirely a secular holiday with a tradition of shopping and post-Christmas sales starting. We invite people who celebrate this holiday to contribute to the information here.
Tags: Boxing  Day  Commonwealth  Nations 
Added: 26th December 2009
Views: 894
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Posted By: Admin
Babe Ruth  - Final Game With Yankees This photo issued by Acme Newspictures on September 30, 1934, shows the immortal Babe Ruth exiting Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. following the New York Yankees' final game of the 1934 season. Washington won 5-3 in a game that took just 80 minutes to play. Ruth went 0-for-3 at the plate but did score a run before being replaced by Myril Hoag in right field. Detroit won the American League pennant in 1934, so there would be no World Series farewell for Ruth. Ruth was honored at Griffith Stadium earlier that day with gifts and he announced his retirement from baseball before a crowd of about 15,000. (Before the 1935 season Ruth was convinced to return to the game by Boston Braves owner Judge Emil Fuchs. He only played a month before quitting the last-place Braves.) Ruth's departure from the Yankees was bitter and messy. His playing skills were obviously diminishing and Lou Gehrig was now the team's star attraction. After years of unsuccessfully lobbying for the managerial position with Yankees' owner Jacob Ruppert, Ruth had had enough. This photo shows a dejected Ruth, with his head down, making his exit outside the ballpark. A boy is shown trying to chase down the Babe for an autograph, but Ruth (who usually accommodated everyone) was in a foul mood and had no time to pen the lad's baseball. A policeman is gesturing with his hands to the kid with a "not-today-son" motion. Six days earlier, on Monday, September 24, 1934, Ruth made his final Yankee Stadium appearance as a player in New York's 5-0 loss to the Boston Red Sox. He was pulled early in the game from his right feld position. There were no special ceremonies to mark the occasion. Fewer than 2,000 fans attended the game.
Tags: baseball  Babe  Ruth  Yankees  photo 
Added: 22nd May 2012
Views: 3001
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Posted By: Lava1964
Soap on a Rope I remember giving my dad this.
Tags: Soap  on  a  rope  dad  gifts  Christmas  gift  Xmas  gift 
Added: 11th December 2013
Views: 1477
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Posted By: Cathy
Readers Digest August 1970 Issue Date: August 1970; Vol. 97, No. 580 Articles, subjects and contributors in this issue: COVER: Bicycle Byway by Ralph Avery. From Bach to Books by Jeffrey R. Haskell. The Crow and the Oriole by James Thurber. Boss of the Park -- Umpires -- by Bill Surface. The Plains a Boy a Summer Day by Hal Borland. 41 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Living. Russia's Menacing New Challenge in the Middle East by Joseph Alsop. We Need Our Young Activists by John D. Rockefeller 3rd. Portrait of a Mobster -- Carlos Marcello -- by William Schulz. Sexual Inadequacy -- And What Can Be Done About It by Will Bradbury. How to Talk With Your Teen Ager About Drugs by Herman W. Land. Toward a Livable Environment: I Victory in the Everglades by Jean George. II A Sensible Plan for Future Development by James Nathan Miller. The Car in the River by E. D. Fales Jr. Bold New Directions for U S High Schools by Arlene Silberman. Poverty at the Border by Lester Velie. Try Giving Yourself Away David Dunn. Japan -- All Asia Watches and Wonders by Carl T. Rowan. The Gifts of Gregory Menn by Joseph P. Blank. Better Living With Machinery by Charles McDowell Jr. L Dopa Has Set Me Free by Floyd Miller. Time to Knock Out the Vote Thieves! by Louis B. Nichols. Provocative; Prophetic Margaret Mead by David Dempsey. How to Murder Your Husband by Jean Mayer. Rugged Idaho by Don Wharton. They Go to Prison on Purpose Arthur Gordon. What the Moon Rocks Reveal by Fred Warshofsky. The Lesson of the Lemmings by Ola and Emily d'Aulaire. Bottoms Up! by Jack Goodman and Alan Green. The Duel That Changed Our History by Thomas Fleming. Paper Magic of Origami by and Akira Yoshizawa by Leland Stowe. KGB: The Swallows' Nest "KGB" by John Barron.
Tags: Readers  Digest  August  1970  articles  magazine   
Added: 26th December 2014
Views: 1246
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Posted By: Cathy
Mothers Day Breakfast In Bed Tags: Mothers  Day  Breakfast  In  Bed  gifts  children  husband 
Added: 10th May 2015
Views: 549
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
S and H Green Stamps Tags: S&H  Green  Stamps  Commercial  Advertisement  Parade  Redemption  Coupons  Gifts  prizes  trade  stamps  coupons 
Added: 15th July 2015
Views: 602
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Posted By: Cliffy

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