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Umpire Bill Klem 'I never called one wrong!' Bill Klem once immodestly told a reporter. Klem is still widely regarded as baseball's greatest umpire nearly 70 years after he last worked a game. He was a National League arbiter from 1906 through 1941. The innovative Klem (pictured here in 1914) was the first umpire to wear an inside chest protector and the first to use hand signals to keep fans and players informed about his calls. (Klem said, 'The fan in the 25-cent bleacher seat has just as much right to know what I called as the fan in the box seat near home plate.') Klem was so skilled at calling balls and strikes that he only worked behind the plate for a number of years. He worked 18 World Series--a record that will never be broken because MLB now uses a rotation system rather than a merit system to assign umpires to post-season games. Klem was affectionately called 'The Old Arbitrator'--a nickname he adored. The jowly and thick-lipped Klem hated the nickname 'Catfish.' Any player who addressed him that way was quickly ejected. He had a strange relationship with New York Giants' manager John McGraw. Off the field the two were good friends; on the field they feuded bitterly. My favorite Bill Klem story: In 1941, while working the bases, he called a runner out on a tag play at second base. The runner angrily insisted the tag had missed him. Klem informed the irate player, 'I thought you were out.' Then the realization hit him: For the first time in his long career Klem only thought a player was out--he wasn't certain. Klem resigned the next day.
Tags: baseball  umpire  Bill  Klem 
Added: 1st September 2009
Views: 1758
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fred Snodgrass 1912 World Series Goat This is a photo of the first in a long line of World Series 'goats'--ballplayers who made critical blunders in the spotlight of the Fall Classic. In 1912, Fred Snodgrass of the New York Giants dropped Clyde Engel's routine fly ball in the bottom of the 10th inning of the deciding game of the World Series. The muff led to the Boston Red Sox turning a one-run deficit into a stunning 3-2 win. Sports writers called it the '$30,000 muff' because that was the difference between the winners' share of the 1912 World Series receipts and the losers' share. Despite an enormously successful real estate career in California after he retired from baseball, Snodgrass could never escape his infamous error. On April 5, 1974, the headline of Snodgrass' obituary in the New York Times read, 'Snodgrass, 86, Dead. Ballplayer Muffed 1912 Fly.'
Tags: Fred  Snodgrass  baseball  goat 
Added: 21st March 2009
Views: 1642
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wallace Reid Tragedy One of Hollywood's first truly tragic stories centered on the handsome and likable Wallace Ried. Reid was one of the silents screen's biggest stars from 1919 to 1922. Hailing from a showbiz family, he initially hoped to be a film director. At age 19 Reid took a script his father had written to Vitagraph Studios. The studio recognized Reid's potential as a sex symbol and cast him as an actor. The versatile Reid often worked as a director, writer, and even as a cameraman. He was featured in two of D.W. Griffith's epics: Birth of a Nation (1915) and Intolerance (1916). Reid also appeared as a dashing race car driver in several Famous Player films, becoming a major cinema heartthrob. While making The Valley of the Giants (1919), Reid was injured in a train wreck. The studio gave Reid morphine injections for the pain so he could continue working. Because Reid was so valuable, his studio kept providing him with more and more morphine so he could keep making movies. Reid quickly became deeply addicted but there was virtually no drug-addiction help in those days. By 1922, Reid's health was in tatters. He died on January 18, 1923 at age 31. His widow, Dorothy Davenport, made a film about drug addiction titled Human Wreckage and toured with it to raise national awareness of the dangers of morphine.
Tags: Wallace  Reid 
Added: 16th December 2007
Views: 1547
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bobby Thomsons Home Run The single most dramatic moment in American sports history: Bobby Thomson's home run that won the 1951 National League pennant for the New York Giants. The Giants had trailed the Brooklyn Dodgers by 13.5 games in August, but they won 38 of their last 44 games to finish tied with the Dodgers at the end of the season. A three-game playoff was needed to settle matters. The Giants and Dodgers split the first two games. The Dodgers were leading the deciding game 4-1 heading into the bottom of the ninth. The Giants scored a run and had two men on base with one out. Bobby Thomson came to bat...
Tags: Bobby  Thomson  home  run 
Added: 6th January 2008
Views: 1637
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Posted By: Lava1964
Still The Perfect Season 1972 Miami Dolphins Tags: Still  The  Perfect  Season-  1972  Miami  Dolphins  NFL  New  England  Patriots  New  York  Giants 
Added: 4th February 2008
Views: 1673
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Posted By: Cliffy
Duke Snider and Sal Maglie on Whats My Line Duke Snider of the Brooklyn Dodgers and Sal Maglie of the New York Giants appear as co-mystery challengers on What's My Line on September 5, 1954 when baseball was king. Amazingly, they seem to get along just fine.
Tags: Duke  Snider  Sal  Maglie  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 14th April 2008
Views: 1470
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Polo Grounds The Polo Grounds was the home stadium for baseball's New York Giants from 1883 to 1957. There were actually four stadiums that were called The Polo Grounds. This is the last and most famous. Its horseshoe shape created some odd dimensions. The foul lines ran for a mere 257 feet but the the distant center field bleachers were 505 feet away from home plate. This ballpark was where Willie Mays made his spectacular catch during the 1954 World Series and where Bobby Thomson hit baseball's most famous home run in 1951. Oh, yes: The first stadium was built for polo in 1876, but after the Giants acquired it for baseball in 1883, no polo matches were ever played there again.
Tags: Polo  Grounds  baseball 
Added: 27th June 2008
Views: 1275
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Posted By: Lava1964
Classic Football Photo In this classic sports photo from 1960, Chuck Bednarik of the Philadelphia Eagles towers above Frank Gifford of the New York Giants--whom Bednarik had just flattened with a pulverizing hit. Gifford was out of action for a year!
Tags: Chuck  Bednarik  Frank  Gifford  football 
Added: 25th September 2008
Views: 1216
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Posted By: Lava1964
Frank Gifford on Whats My Line New York Giants' halfback Frank Gifford appears as a regular contestant on the December 2, 1956 episode of What's My Line. Earlier that day Gifford had figured in all four the the Giants' touchdowns in the team's 28-14 victory over the Washington Redskins. Gifford was named the NFL's MVP in 1956. Panelists Dorothy Kilgallen and Arlene Francis are clearly smitten by the handsome 26-year-old gridiron star.
Tags: Whats  My  Line  Frank  Gifford 
Added: 9th March 2009
Views: 1755
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Posted By: Lava1964
Raymond Berry on Whats My Line Raymond Berry of the Baltimore Colts, a future NFL Hall-Of-Famer, was a regular contestant on the November 9, 1958 episode of What's My Line. Berry's team had just lost that day to the New York Giants. About a month later the Colts and Giants would famously meet again at Yankee Stadium in the 1958 NFL championship game--which the Colts would win in overtime. Many football historians claim that particular game made the NFL a big-time venture.
Tags: Whats  My  Line  Raymond  Berry 
Added: 27th January 2009
Views: 2058
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Posted By: Lava1964

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