Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2755
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 1663
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Speed Checked By Radar Tags: M*A*S*H  Walter  Eugene  "Radar"  O’Reilly  Gary  Burghoff 
Added: 23rd December 2013
Views: 1546
Rating:
Posted By: pfc
Original Match Game Most people recall Match Game from its heyday in the 1970s when it featured two contestants and six celebrities. The original version of The Match Game aired from 1962 through 1969 and was quite different than the free-wheeling 1970s show. See for yourself. This clip is from 1964, and yes, Gene Rayburn was the host then too.
Tags: Match  Game  1960s 
Added: 1st December 2007
Views: 3029
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Hyper Match Game Contestant 2 Here's another high-energy, uncontrollable Match Game contestant. This one nearly flings poor Gene Rayburn into the Star Wheel!
Tags: Match  Game  contestant 
Added: 1st December 2007
Views: 1565
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Nat King Cole Sings The Christmas Song This song was written in 1944 by Mel Tormé and Bob Wells. The Nat King Cole Trio first recorded it in 1946. At Cole's request, and over the objections of his label, Capitol Records, a second recording was made the same year using a small string section, this version became a huge hit on both the pop and R&B charts. Cole re-recorded the song in 1953 and again in 1961, using the same arrangement with a full orchestra. Mel Tormé himself eventually recorded his own version in 1965. However, the 1961 recording by Cole is generally regarded as definitive and continues to receive considerable radio airplay each holiday season. Cole's version was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1974.
Tags: the  christmas  song  nat  king  cole  mel  torme 
Added: 2nd December 2007
Views: 3458
Rating:
Posted By: Babs64
1936 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony Before 1936, the opening ceremonies for the Olympic Games were generally low-key. However, Nazi Germany turned them into a well choreographed event. All Olympic opening ceremonies since then have been influenced by what took place in Berlin in 1936.
Tags: 1936  Summer  Olympics  ceremony 
Added: 3rd December 2007
Views: 1790
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1945 Look Cover Look was a bi-weekly, general-interest magazine published in Des Moines, Iowa from 1937 to 1971, with more of an emphasis on photographs than articles. A large-size magazine of 11 by 14 inches, it was generally considered the also-ran to Life magazine, which began publication only months earlier and also ended in 1971 . . .
Tags: magazine  Look   
Added: 6th December 2007
Views: 1524
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Field of Dreams Final Scene 'Hey, Dad, do you want to have a catch?' There's something about baseball and its generational link to fathers and sons. Most guys are too macho to admit it, but this final scene from Field Of Dreams (1988) usually gets to them.
Tags: Field  of  Dreams  catch  scene 
Added: 8th December 2007
Views: 6993
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple Military Man Dance When Hollywood was Hollywood! Eight-year-old Shirley Temple dances 'Military Man' with Alice Faye and Jack Haley in the final scene of Poor Little Rich Girl (1936). Shirley's fans generally consider this long and complex dance routine to be the toughest she was ever required to do. Shirley nails it, of course!
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Jack  Haley  Alice  Faye  Military  Man 
Added: 9th December 2007
Views: 2931
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8 9 10 11 of 32 | Random