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Vintage Farrah i love this old pic. . . and here's a little Farrah TRIVIA: Farrah Fawcett was originally offered the Goldie Hawn role in the movie Foul Play. Farrah earned a degree in Microbiology in her later years when she went back to college. Farrah attended W.B. Ray High School in Corpus Christi and graduated with the class of 1965. They had voted her the Best Looking. . . and this Farrah quote: The reason that the all-American boy prefers beauty to brains is that he can see better than he can think...sorry guys!
Tags: farrah  fawcett  trivia  quote 
Added: 11th September 2007
Views: 2298
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Posted By: Teresa
Andrew Golota The Foul Pole This is painful to watch. In 1996 Polish heavyweight boxer Andrew Golota was on his way to the big time. He was convincingly beating former champ Riddick Bowe when he repeatedly hit Bowe with low blows and was diqualified. A few months later the two met in a rematch. The same thing couldn't happen again, could it? Hey, that's why boxing writers dubbed Golota 'The Foul Pole!'
Tags: Andrew  Golota  boxing  fouls 
Added: 23rd January 2008
Views: 2099
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Polo Grounds The Polo Grounds was the home stadium for baseball's New York Giants from 1883 to 1957. There were actually four stadiums that were called The Polo Grounds. This is the last and most famous. Its horseshoe shape created some odd dimensions. The foul lines ran for a mere 257 feet but the the distant center field bleachers were 505 feet away from home plate. This ballpark was where Willie Mays made his spectacular catch during the 1954 World Series and where Bobby Thomson hit baseball's most famous home run in 1951. Oh, yes: The first stadium was built for polo in 1876, but after the Giants acquired it for baseball in 1883, no polo matches were ever played there again.
Tags: Polo  Grounds  baseball 
Added: 27th June 2008
Views: 1426
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Posted By: Lava1964
Winston Churchill Photograph This famous photo of a defiant and angry-looking Winston Churchill was taken in Ottawa in December 1941 by famed Canadian photographer Yousuf Karsh. According to Karsh, Churchill was in a foul mood because the photographer had yanked a cigar from the great man's mouth moments before the picture was taken!
Tags: Winston  Churchill  photograph 
Added: 12th August 2008
Views: 1245
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Posted By: Lava1964
Steve Bartman Incident The most infamous example of a sports fan influencing the outcome of a game occurred on October 14, 2003. It was the sixth game of the National League Championship Series. The hard-luck Chicago Cubs led the Florida Marlins three games to two and 3-0 in the top of the eighth inning. With the Cubs just five outs away from advancing to the World Series for the first time since 1945, a foul ball drifted one row into Wrigley Field's seats along the third base line. Cubs' left fielder Moises Alou drifted over to make the catch, but spectator Steve Bartman--and several other fans--tried to catch the ball. Bartman (shown here with his arms outstretched) got his hands on it briefly, thus preventing Alou from having a chance to make the catch. Fan interference could not be called because the ball was actually over the seating area. Bartman was escorted from Wrigley Field to protect him from furious fellow Cub fans. Six police cars surrounded his home. Bartman has been in hiding ever since. The Marlins ended up scoring eight runs that inning and won the game 8-3. They also won the seventh game of the NLCS and the 2003 World Series.
Tags: baseball  Steve  Bartman  incident 
Added: 8th September 2008
Views: 3523
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gerry Cooney Fouls Larry Holmes One of the best heavyweight championship fights of the 1980s was Gerry Cooney's attempt to win the title from champion Larry Holmes in June 1982. Although it was a very competitive fight (won by Holmes in the 13th round) it is most famous for Gerry Cooney's egregious foul late in round nine. Just watching it will make every male cringe in pain! Ouch! (The tenth round is also part of this clip.)
Tags: boxing  Gerry  Cooney  Larry  Holmes  foul 
Added: 9th December 2008
Views: 1392
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Posted By: Lava1964
Infomercial King Billy Mays Found Dead in Home DEVELOPING: Television pitchman Billy Mays who built his fame by appearing on commercials and infomercials promoting household products and gadgets died Sunday, FOX News confirms. Mays was found unresponsive by his wife inside his Tampa, Fla., home at 7:45 a.m. on Sunday, according to the Tampa Police Department. Police said there were no signs of forced entry to May's residence and foul play is not suspected. Authorities said an autopsy should be complete by Monday afternoon. Mays, 50, was on board a US Airways flight that blew out its front tires as it landed at a Tampa airport on Saturday, MyFOXTampa.com reported. "Although Billy lived a public life, we don't anticipate making any public statements over the next couple of days. Our family asks that you respect our privacy during these difficult times," Mays wife, Deborah, said in a statement on Sunday.
Tags: Billy  Mays  Oxi  Clean    Infomercials  Commercials  Mays  Promotions,  Inc  Max  Appel  Home  Shopping  Network  OxiClean,  Orange  Glo,  Kaboom,  Engrave  It,  Handy  Switch,  iCan,  Mighty  Mendit,  Mighty  Putty 
Added: 28th June 2009
Views: 1465
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Posted By: Steve
South End Grounds - Boston This is a photo of one of the great ballparks of the 19th century: South End Grounds, the home of Boston's National League club. Having a short distance to both foul poles and a vast center field, the park opened to great acclaim on May 25, 1888. It was actually the second of three ballparks to bear that name. Nearly six years later, on May 15, 1894, the mostly wooden park burned to the ground during a game. (Police placed the blame on kids playing with matches under the bleachers.) Another 117 buildings in the neighborhood also were destroyed in the fire. The National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown has a fabulous computerized 'virtual exhibit' on this ballpark based on photographic evidence.
Tags: baseball  South  End  Grounds  Boston 
Added: 19th May 2009
Views: 1322
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Posted By: Lava1964
Judge Crater Disappearance 1930 Joseph Force Crater was an associate judge of the New York Supreme Court. On August 6, 1930, the 41-year-old Crater was in New York City, ostensibly on business, while his wife vacationed without him in Maine. While in New York, Crater spent time with his young showgirl mistress, Sally Lou Ritz. Crater dined with Ritz and a lawyer friend, then they attended a play. When the show ended, Crater's companions got into a taxi and watched Crater walk away...never to be seen again. After several days it was obvious to the judge's wife and colleagues that something was terribly amiss--especially when court reconvened on August 25 with Crater still absent. An investigation was launched. When the story hit the newspapers, a nationwide manhunt began. Naturally, foul play was suspected. On the morning of his disappearance, Crater's assistant had helped the judge cash two checks totaling more than $5,100. The money was put into two locked briefcases and taken to the judge's apartment. Speculation ran along the lines of Crater paying blackmail money. A grand jury trial followed, yielding 975 pages of testimony. It implicated Crater in shady real estate and financial deals, but the authorities had no success in finding any trace of the judge. (Sally Lou Ritz escaped much of the publicity--but not the gossip--when she herself vanished, never to be seen again.) Crater's wife did not return to her New York City apartment until January 31, 1931--where she found a manila envelope addressed to her in the judge's handwriting. It contained his will, $6,619 in cash, several checks, stocks, bonds, life insurance policies, and a hurriedly penned three-page personal note. The envelope had apparently been placed there after the police had searched the apartment. (Three checks were dated August 30--more than three weeks after the judge had vanished!) For several decades the term 'pulling a Judge Crater' was slang for vanishing or leaving an awkward situation discreetly. On August 19, 2005, authorities announced they had obtained a letter written by Stella Ferrucci-Good, who had recently died at age 91. The missive indicated that Judge Crater had been murdered by her late husband, a policeman, and a cab driver friend. Supposedly a skeleton found under the boardwalk at Coney Island in the 1950s was Crater's. An aquarium now occupies the site. The unidentified bones were interred in a mass grave on Hart Island, the usual spot where unclaimed corpses were commonly buried in unmarked plots. However, Ferrucci-Good's story has a major hole: no record exists of a body ever being found under the Coney Island boardwalk.
Tags: Judge  Crater  disappearance 
Added: 16th September 2009
Views: 2172
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Posted By: Lava1964
NBA Shot Clock Invented 1954 It was the innovation that saved professional basketball: The 24-second shot clock. Coach Howard Hobson came up with with the idea of a shot clock, but it was first used in 1954 in Syracuse, New York. There Danny Biasone, the owner of the National Basketball Association's Syracuse Nationals, experimented with a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. He then convinced the NBA to adopt it. In the pre-shot clock days, the NBA had problems attracting fans and television coverage. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they took the lead. Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball in the front court endlessly without penalty. If the team in the lead chose to stall, the trailing team was forced to commit fouls to get the ball back following the free throw. Low-scoring, boring games with many fouls were common. The most extreme case occurred on November 22, 1950, when the Fort Wayne Pistons defeated the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. A few weeks later, the Rochester Royals and Indianapolis Olympians played a soporific six-overtime game with only one shot in each overtime. The NBA tried several rule changes in the early 1950s to speed up the game and reduce fouls before eventually adopting Biasone's idea. How did Biasone arrive at the strange figure of 24 seconds? According to Biasone, 'I looked at the box scores from games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes--2,880 seconds--and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot.' When the shot clock first came into vogue, it made players so nervous that it hardly came into play; players were generally taking fewer than 20 seconds to shoot. According to Syracuse player Dolph Schayes, 'We thought we had to take quick shots. But as time went on, we saw the inherent genius in Danny's 24 seconds. You could work the ball around for a good shot.'
Tags: NBA  shot  clock 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 3558
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Posted By: Lava1964

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