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Oliver Sipple - The Man Who Saved Gerald Ford On September 22, 1975, 33-year-old Oliver Sipple (the man with the sideburns in the left of the photo) was walking past the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco where President Gerald Ford was scheduled to speak. As Sipple moved forward to better hear Ford's speech, he noticed a woman standing next to him (later identified as Sara Jane Moore) reach into her raincoat and pull out a revolver. Sipple yelled, "Gun!" and instinctively grabbed for her arm and deflected it as she pulled the trigger. The bullet, intended for the president who was just 40 feet away, ricocheted off a wall and slightly wounded another bystander. Sipple, a decorated Vietnam vet, tackled Moore, prevented her from shooting again, and handed her over to the Secret Service. Oliver Sipple now became a reluctant celebrity. He was immediately hailed in the national press and received thousands of letters praising his heroics. However, President Ford only sent him a short note and avoided a personal meeting. News organizations wondered why the White House was avoiding Sipple. Although he was openly gay, Sipple’s sexual orientation was a secret from his family and employers. Accordingly, he asked the press to keep his sexuality off the record. However, news organizations refused to comply. The gay community saw the situation as a great opportunity. While discussing whether or not Sipple’s sexuality ought to be disclosed, prominent gay San Francisco's councilman Harvey Milk noted: “For once we can show that gays do heroic things, not just all that caca about molesting children and hanging out in bathrooms.” Milk further suggested that Sipple’s sexual orientation was the reason he received only a note from Ford rather than a formal invitation to the White House. Herb Caen, a columnist at The San Francisco Chronicle, outed Sipple as gay. The Chicago Sun-Times called him a ‘Homosexual Hero’; The Denver Post used the more pithy term ‘Gay Vet’. In Detroit, Sipple’s staunch Baptist family became the subject of ridicule and abuse by friends and neighbors. His mother refused to talk to him. When she died in 1979, his father told him not to attend the funeral. Sipple filed a $15-million invasion of privacy suit against seven newspapers and various publishers, but after a long and bitter process, the courts held that Sipple himself had become news, and that his sexual orientation was part of the story. Oliver Sipple sank into a downward spiral of depression, alcoholism, obesity and drug abuse. By the time he was found dead with an empty bottle of bourbon in 1989, Oliver Sipple was already a forgotten footnote to ethics and freedom of press. His apartment was littered with press clippings about that fateful day in 1975 when he saved a man’s life and subsequently ruined his own.
Tags: Oliver  Sipple  gay  assassination  hero  Ford 
Added: 9th July 2012
Views: 1297
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Posted By: Lava1964
Leo Randolph - Forgotten Olympian The 1976 American Olympic boxing team won five gold medals, one silver, and one bronze. Four of the gold medallists eventually won professional world titles. Though largely forgotten today, Leo Randolph was one of them. Randolph, a resident of Tacoma, WA, won the flyweight division at the Montreal Olympics at age 18. (In the gold-medal match against Cuba's Ramon Duvalon, many boxing fans thought Randolph was the recipient of a generous decision.) Randolph waited nearly two years before turning professional. In the interim he finished high school and worked at a Boeing aircraft factory. Randolph's early pro opponents, in most cases, left a lot to be desired as there are few quality pro boxers in the lightest weight categories in North America. Nevertheless, Randolph beat Colombia's Ricardo Cardona for the WBA junior featherweight title on May 4, 1980 with a 15th-round knockout. However, in his first defense of his title just three months later, Randolph was totally outclassed by Sergio Palma of Argentina. The challenger battered Randolph and won the title with a sixth-round technical knockout. Saying his heart was no longer in boxing, Randolph collected his $72,000 purse and promptly retired after the bout at age 22, compiling a pro record of 17-2. In a 1996 "Where Are They Now?" feature in Sports Illustrated, Randolph was happily employed as a bus driver for Pierce Transit in the Pacific northwest.
Tags: boxing  Leo  Randolph  Olympics 
Added: 27th December 2012
Views: 332
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Posted By: Lava1964
Winning Streak - Forgotten Game Show Here is the only known complete episode of the word-based game show Winning Streak. Don't remember it? You're not alone. It only aired on NBC for six months from July 1, 1974 to January 3, 1975. Bill Cullen was the host. I can tell you one thing: a mediocre tournament Scrabble player would clean up at this game!
Tags: Winning  Streak  game  show  Bill  Cullen 
Added: 28th March 2013
Views: 440
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
DeMarco Sisters on WML The singing DeMarco sisters were mystery guests on the February 22, 1953 episode of What's My Line. Largely forgotten today, the DeMarcos became popular from their appearances on Fred Allen's radio program. They give a sample of their lovely harmony at the end of the clip. This was Hal Block's next-to-last show as a WML panelist. Steve Allen was being groomed to replace him.
Tags: DeMarco  sisters  singers  WML 
Added: 24th September 2013
Views: 400
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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