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Brady Kids Sing Time To Change This is from a 1972 episode of The Brady Bunch titled Dough Re Mi. You've probably seen it a dozen times: Greg writes a surefire hit song (We Can Make The World A Whole Lot Brighter) and cajoles the other five Brady kids to chip in to buy time at a recording studio. But, oh no, puberty sets in and Peter's voice starts to change! It looks like the Brady kids will have to forfeit their non-refundable $150, but Greg saves the day by writing Time To Change--a song that features Peter's cracking voice.
Tags: Brady  Bunch  Time  To  Change 
Added: 24th November 2007
Views: 3701
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ten-Cent Beer Night Riot On June 4, 1974 the Cleveland Indians held the most short-sighted promotion in pro sports history: Ten-Cent Beer Night. There was no limit to the amount of 10-ounce Stroh's beers one could buy for a dime each. Hey, what could possibly go wrong? The promotion drew a crowd of 25,000 people--about three times what the Indians were usually drawing in 1974. The souses chugged down more than 65,000 cups of beer. The effects of the discount brews caused rowdyism to break out in the stands from the get-go. It eventually spread to the field. Among the lowlights: Fans tossed firecrackers at the Rangers players. A naked man ran onto the field and slid into second base. A father and son duo ran onto the field and mooned the crowd. The climax occurred in the bottom of the ninth inning. A fan entered the field and tried to swipe Jeff Burroughs' glove. When he resisted, punches were exchanged and more fans entered the field to join the frey. Both the Rangers and the Indians came out of their dugouts wielding bats to defend Burroughs. Mayhem ensued. Fans ripped chairs from the stadium and tossed them in all directions. The game was abandoned by the umpires with the score tied 5-5. The visiting Texas Rangers were awarded a forfeit win. The Indians had several more discount beer promotions scheduled--and still intended to hold them--but the American League outlawed them.
Tags: Ten  Cent  Beer  Night  Cleveland  baseball 
Added: 4th June 2008
Views: 2358
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Posted By: Lava1964
Danny Almonte Scandal 2001 Remeber Danny Almonte? He was the 5-foot-8 star pitcher at the 2001 Little League World Series. Almonte struck out 62 of the 72 batters he faced. He threw a perfect game too. Danny was honored by New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani. Trouble was Danny was two years too old to be playing in the LLWS. Danny's father, Felipe, had falsified Danny's Dominican Republic birth certificate so it read 1989 instead of 1987. Because Danny towered over most of the other players in the tournament, accusations that he was too old were widespread. The truth was finally uncovered by two journalists from Sports Illustrated. Danny's Bronx, New York team had to forfeit their third-place standing. Felipe Almonte faced charges of filing a false document when he was deported back to the Dominican Republic. To make matters worse, there was no record of Danny attending school in the year his team went to the LLWS. He could not speak any English.
Tags: Danny  Almonte  baseball  scandal 
Added: 18th August 2008
Views: 1360
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Posted By: Lava1964
Last Canadian WWI Soldier Turns 109 John Babcock, believed to be Canada's last surviving First World War veteran, turned 109 years old today. Since 1924 he has been living in Spokane, WA. Because there were no dual citizenship laws at the time, when Babcock obtained American citizenship, he had to forfeit his Canadian citizenship. After Canada's prime minister Stephen Harper learned about this, Mr. Babcock had his Canadian citizenship restored in a special ceremony in 2008. Babcock is pictured here with his 80-year-old wife. (Cradle robber!)
Tags: First  World  War  veteran  Canada  John  Babcock 
Added: 23rd July 2009
Views: 837
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Posted By: Lava1964
Georgia Tech Beats Cumberland 222-0 The worst rout in the history of American college football was administered by mighty Georgia Tech against tiny Cumberland College on October 7, 1916. The final score was 222-0. There were some extenuating circumstances. Cumberland had signed a contract a year in advance to play Georgia Tech in Atlanta in 1916, but discontinued its football program after the 1915 season. However, the contract with Tech included a hefty $3,000 forfeit penalty if Cumberland failed to put a team on the field against Tech. Instead of paying the fine, Cumberland threw together a team on short notice. The team never held a single practise. One player, a law student, recalled years later, 'We put a lot of faith in the clause about placing a team on the field. There was nothing in the contract requiring us to play well.' Tech coach John Heisman showed no mercy. His squad scored nine touchdowns in both the first and second quarters to lead 126-0 at halftime. Tech agreed to shorten the third and fourth quarters and only scored 14 more touchdowns. In all, Tech scored 32 touchdowns (and 30 conversions). Tech also amassed 1,650 yards rushing on just 40 attempts. Cumberland's rushing total was -96 yards. They did complete two passes, though. Tech did not attempt a pass all game. Most interesting stat: There were no first downs by either team. All of Tech's big plays went for touchdowns. Cumberland's biggest play was a 10-yard pass completion on a fourth-and-28 situation. Despite their historic defeat, the Cumberland players returned to their Lebanon, TN campus as heroes for saving their small school $3,000.
Tags: college  football  Georgia  Tech  Cumberland 
Added: 28th October 2009
Views: 3415
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
College Football Hoax 1941 In the autumn of 1941 many football fans began following the exploits of Plainfield (NJ) Teachers College. Too bad the school and its football team didn't really exist. It was an elaborate hoax that fooled hundreds of newspapers--even the New York Times' sports department--and thousands of college football fans. Stockbroker Morris Newburger and radio announcer Alexander (Bink) Dannenbaum concocted the idea of a mythical college football team. Using the name 'Jerry Croyden,' Newburger telephoned the New York City newspapers while Dannenbaum phoned the Philadelphia papers with fantastic stories of Plainfield's lopsided victories over nonexistent schools. With the newspapers printing Plainfield's scores week after week without question, Newburger and Dannenbaum got bolder. They began writing creative press releases about the new football powerhouse. One release praised Plainfield's star runningback, a 'full-blooded Chinese-American' sophomore named Johnny (The Celestial Comet) Chung. Chung's amazing abilities on the gridiron were credited to the handfuls of wild rice he ate during huddles. The Teachers' offense operated out of an innovative 'W' formation in which all the linemen but the center faced backwards. Colorful Hopalong Hobelitz was named as Plainfield's coach. Six weeks of spectacular Plainfield victories raised speculation that the team might secure a bid to a coveted bowl game. Curious journalist Red Smith of the Philadelphia Record journeyed to Plainfield to find the college. Of course, there wasn't one. Their fraud exposed, Newburger and Dannenbaum confessed--but only after Jerry Croyden issued one final bogus press release. It announced Plainfield was forfeiting its remaining games because Chung and several other players were declared academically ineligible after flunking their exams.
Tags: Plainfield  Teachers  College  football  hoax 
Added: 12th November 2009
Views: 3008
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Posted By: Lava1964
1992 Little League World Series Scandal In 1992 the Little League baseball team representing Zamboanga City, Philippines won its way through national trials and the Far East series. After brushing aside the competition at Williamsport, PA, the team was crowned the champion of the 46th Little League World Series. Not long afterward, though, the team was stripped of its title after Filipino journalists revealed the team had used ineligible players who did not meet either age or residency requirements. In 1992 the LLWS introduced a new format--round-robins within both the American and International pools. Zamboanga City thumped Kaiserslauten, Germany, then Valleyfield, Quebec to clinch a berth in the International final. They lost a meaningless game to Epyguerrerro, Dominican Republic, but beat them 5-1 when it counted in the International final. The LLWS championship game, on August 29, against Long Beach, California, was a blowout, with Zamboanga City scoring seven runs in the first inning and cruising to an easy 15-4 win. The team was hailed as heroes in the Philippines. Filipino president Fidel V. Ramos awarded the players' families a million pesos. Long Beach head coach Jeff Burroughs remarked that one Filipino pitcher, Roberto Placious, had the poise of a high school or college pitcher. He may have been right! A few days after Zamboanga City's victory, journalist Al Mendoza of the Philippine Daily Inquirer began a series of stories suggesting that some players were ineligible for the LLWS. In response to this allegation, Little League headquarters faxed administrator Armando Andaya questions regarding the players' ages, birth certificates, residence--and a specific question regarding pitcher Ian Tolentino's participation in a tournament in 1990 (suggesting this would have made him overage in 1992). Andaya admitted to violating rules on district representation. Eight players were from outside the Zamboanga City area--some came from as far away as Luzon and were unable to speak Chabacano, the language most commonly spoken in Zamboanga. Little League Baseball promptly stripped Zamboanga City of its title. Under Little League rules at the time, when a team was found to have used an ineligible player, it forfeited only its most recent game. Since the revelation was made after the championship game, that game was declared a 6-0 forfeit victory for Long Beach--which was awarded the LLWS title. The exposed players and parents remained defiant, and accused Little League Baseball of denying them due process. Many Filipinos were outraged at what they saw as a betrayal by Mendoza. (He was given the key to the city of Long Beach!) Nevertheless, fellow Inquirer journalist Armand N. Nocum conducted a further investigation and found that even the six true Zamboangueños were overage--one was at least 15--and thus ineligible. It was further discovered the fraud was based upon the ineligible players assuming the identities of eligible players who had represented the city at the national championships. In some cases, even the parents of the ineligible players assumed false identities to maintain the appearance of propriety. Apparently no lesson was learned by the Zamboanga City Little League. The very next year its team was disqualified from the Filipino national championship tournament in another overage-player scandal.
Tags: cheating  Little  League  Baseball  scandal  Philippines 
Added: 28th August 2011
Views: 3686
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Posted By: Lava1964
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 3039
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 4826
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Aloysius Travers - Emergency Pitcher One of the most interesting pitching lines in MLB history belongs to Aloysius (Al) Travers, a 20-year old seminary student, who pitched once for the Detroit Tigers in 1912--a complete-game 24-2 loss to the defending World Series champion Philadelphia A's. Of course there has to be an explanation: Travers wasn't really a pitcher! He was hastily recruited among a group of local Philadelphia amateur ballplayers to replace the striking Detroit Tigers. The Tigers' regulars walked off the field shortly before game time at Philadelphia's Shibe Park on Saturday, May 18, 1912 to protest the suspension of center fielder Ty Cobb. (Cobb had jumped into the stands during a game in New York three days earlier to fight a heckler.) Faced with a potential forfeit and a huge fine, the Tigers' management recruited Travers and other amateur players as emergency replacements. Travers was the ersatz Tigers' only pitcher--and he wasn't even good enough to make the baseball team at St. Joseph's College. Be that as it may, Travers was forced to face some of the most vaunted hitters in the majors in front of 20,000 fans. In eight innings, he allowed 24 runs (14 earned), and 26 hits. Travers also walked seven A's and struck out one. He was paid $25 for his efforts. Travers, shown here in a photograph taken late in his life, eventually became a priest. To date, Travers is the only priest known to have pitched in an MLB game.
Tags: baseball  Aloysius  Travers  Detroit  Tigers 
Added: 18th July 2012
Views: 2051
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Posted By: Lava1964

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