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Boston Molasses Disaster 1919 On January 15, 1919, one of the strangest disasters in American history killed 21 people in Boston. A enormous holding tank belonging to the Purity Distilling Company containing 2.3 million gallons of molasses burst under pressure. (Molasses was a common sweetener of the era; it could also be distilled into alcohol.) A tidal wave of the sticky goo anywhere from 8 to 15 feet high swept over the neighbourhood moving at an estimated speed of 35 mph. The force of the wave collapsed buildings and part of the elevated railway system. Some victims died in the wreckage of crushed buildings. Others simply drowned in the thick goo. The holding tank was certainly defective and Purity Distilling was found criminally liable, but the exact cause of the catastrophe was never ascertained.
Tags: Boston  Molasses  Disaster 
Added: 29th July 2009
Views: 1573
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Posted By: Lava1964
Victoria Cross - Valour Road The rarest and most cherished military medal in the world is the Victoria Cross. To be considered for it, one has to be a member of the British armed forces or the armed forces of a British Commonwealth country. One must perform an extraordinarily courageous act under enemy fire that is witnessed by at least one reliable observer. Then the claim has to be investigated. About 1,350 VCs have been awarded since 1856, and only 94 to Canadians (or Newfoundlanders). None are alive today. Against all odds, during the First World War, three Canadians who lived on Pine Street in Winnipeg were all awarded the VC!
Tags: Victoria  Cross  Valour  Road 
Added: 28th July 2009
Views: 783
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Posted By: Lava1964
Viktor Tikhonov - USSR Hockey Coach One of the most familiar faces of Soviet Union hockey was the dour puss of coach Viktor Tikhonov who ran the Central Red Army club team and the Soviet National team with an iron fist and almost unchecked success for 20 years. Tikhonov was born on June 4, 1930. As a player, Tikhonov was a defenceman with the Soviet Air Force and Dynamo Moscow clubs, but he wasn't well known internationally until he became the head coach of both the Central Red Army team and the Soviet Union's national team in 1977. At one point Red Army won 13 consecutive Soviet Elite League titles--which isn't all that surprising considering Tikhonov had the authority of a Red Army general and could immediately draft any player into the armed forces if he showed promise. The USSR won eight IIHF world titles under Tikhonov plus Olympic gold medals in 1984, 1988 and 1992. The USSR's national team also won the 1979 Challenge Cup and 1981 Canada Cup. Tikhonov had power over his players' lives and used it to control every aspect of his team. They routinely trained together for 50 weeks per year while living in army barracks. Canadian hockey great Phil Esposito said the so-called Soviet "amateurs" were more professional than NHL players. Humorless and ruthless, Tikhonov was known for his dictatorial coaching style. He exercised control over his players' lives. His expected absolute obedience--or else. His players quietly called him "the last Stalinist." With tongue-in-cheek humor, western media often referred to Tikhonov as "Chuckles." Tikhonov constantly feared his players would defect if they ever got the slightest chance. Anyone he merely suspected of defecting would be left off teams planning to travel outside the Iron Curtain. In 1991, for instance, he cut Pavel Bure, Valeri Zelepukin, Evgeny Davydov, and Vladimir Konstantinov just before the 1991 Canada Cup. All of them had been drafted by NHL teams, and Tikhonov suspected they were flight risks. Even after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Tikhonov stayed on as the national team coach of Russia for a few more years, but the newer players rebelled against his harsh authoritarian ways. Tikhonov mellowed slighty before going into retirement in 1996. After his retirement, Tikhonov lobbied the Russian government for more attention and better financing for the national team. His grandson plays on the current Russian national squad. Tikhonov died in November 2014.
Tags: hockey  coach  USSR  Viktor  Tikhonov 
Added: 19th February 2014
Views: 537
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Posted By: Lava1964
Soviets Shoot Down KAL Flight 007 On September 1, 1983, a South Korean passenger jet was shot out of the sky by the Soviet Union's air force. There were no survivors.
Tags: KAL  007  disaster 
Added: 10th August 2009
Views: 997
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jeremy Gelbwaks - Original Chris Partridge The Partridge Family was an ABC musical sitcom that ran for four seasons from 1970 to 1974. The show's premise was that recently widowed mother Shirley Partridge and her five children decide to form a pop group to make ends meet and earn money for the children's college funds. The show was loosely based on the real family musical group The Cowsills. In the show's first season Chris Partridge, the drummer and youngest son, was played by Jeremy Gelbwaks. (He seldom had more than two lines in an episode. In fact, in the last episode Gelbwaks appeared in, he had no lines whatsoever.) After the 1970-71 season Gelbwaks was replaced in the cast by Brian Forster. The reason why the change was made varies depending upon whom you ask. Gelbwaks' father was a federal government employee whose job forced him to relocate from California to Virginia just as the show's first season was concluding. The move made it difficult for Jeremy to continue his role as Chris Partridge. However, stories persist that Gelbwaks was a hellion on the set and the show's producers wanted to get rid of him. Danny Bonaduce (who played middle son Danny Partridge--and was admittedly no angel himself) once stated in an interview that Gelbwaks was "psychotic." David Cassidy (who played oldest son and teen heartthrob Keith Partridge) apparently couldn't stand Gelbwaks' on-set antics--which included kicking other cast members just before the director called "Action!" Whether Gelbwaks left on his own accord because of his family's out-of-state move or whether he was was forced out of the cast because of his bad behavior remains a matter of conjecture. Perhaps it was a combination of the two. ABC received zero letters of complaint regarding the cast change. Gelbwaks never worked in show business again. According to a fansite, Gelbwaks is married and lives in New Orleans. Gelbwaks appeared on Danny Bonaduce's short-lived syndicated talk show in 1995 when most of The Partridge Family cast gathered for a 25th anniversary reunion. Both Chrises made appearances on that program and there seemed to be no animosity among those who were present. (David Cassidy was unavailable to appear, however.)
Tags: Jeremy  Gelbwaks  original  Chris  Partridge  Family 
Added: 6th March 2014
Views: 5079
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Posted By: Lava1964
Buzz Aldrin taking a selfie in space 1966 Tags: Edwin  Eugene  Aldrin,  Jr  Buzz  Aldrin  taking  a  selfie  in  space  1966  second  man  on  the  moon  West  Point  Graduate  United  State  Air  Force  Nasa  National  Aeronautics  and  Space  Administration 
Added: 27th June 2014
Views: 857
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Posted By: pfc
Judge Crater Disappearance 1930 Joseph Force Crater was an associate judge of the New York Supreme Court. On August 6, 1930, the 41-year-old Crater was in New York City, ostensibly on business, while his wife vacationed without him in Maine. While in New York, Crater spent time with his young showgirl mistress, Sally Lou Ritz. Crater dined with Ritz and a lawyer friend, then they attended a play. When the show ended, Crater's companions got into a taxi and watched Crater walk away...never to be seen again. After several days it was obvious to the judge's wife and colleagues that something was terribly amiss--especially when court reconvened on August 25 with Crater still absent. An investigation was launched. When the story hit the newspapers, a nationwide manhunt began. Naturally, foul play was suspected. On the morning of his disappearance, Crater's assistant had helped the judge cash two checks totaling more than $5,100. The money was put into two locked briefcases and taken to the judge's apartment. Speculation ran along the lines of Crater paying blackmail money. A grand jury trial followed, yielding 975 pages of testimony. It implicated Crater in shady real estate and financial deals, but the authorities had no success in finding any trace of the judge. (Sally Lou Ritz escaped much of the publicity--but not the gossip--when she herself vanished, never to be seen again.) Crater's wife did not return to her New York City apartment until January 31, 1931--where she found a manila envelope addressed to her in the judge's handwriting. It contained his will, $6,619 in cash, several checks, stocks, bonds, life insurance policies, and a hurriedly penned three-page personal note. The envelope had apparently been placed there after the police had searched the apartment. (Three checks were dated August 30--more than three weeks after the judge had vanished!) For several decades the term 'pulling a Judge Crater' was slang for vanishing or leaving an awkward situation discreetly. On August 19, 2005, authorities announced they had obtained a letter written by Stella Ferrucci-Good, who had recently died at age 91. The missive indicated that Judge Crater had been murdered by her late husband, a policeman, and a cab driver friend. Supposedly a skeleton found under the boardwalk at Coney Island in the 1950s was Crater's. An aquarium now occupies the site. The unidentified bones were interred in a mass grave on Hart Island, the usual spot where unclaimed corpses were commonly buried in unmarked plots. However, Ferrucci-Good's story has a major hole: no record exists of a body ever being found under the Coney Island boardwalk.
Tags: Judge  Crater  disappearance 
Added: 16th September 2009
Views: 1664
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Posted By: Lava1964
Paper Reinforcements I used these things all the time in the late 1970s with my school binders. Are they even still on the market?
Tags: reinforcements 
Added: 5th July 2014
Views: 468
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hillsborough Disaster - 1989 One of the world's most senseless sporting disasters took place on Saturday, April 15, 1989 at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, England. That afternoon 96 soccer fans were crushed to death before and during the early minutes of an FA Cup semifinal between Liverpool FC and Nottingham Forest FC. The stadium was a neutral site, but Liverpool had thousands more fans than Nottingham Forest who sought tickets. As is the custom, the two teams' fans were segregated. The Liverpool supporters were generally assigned standing-room tickets on the south terraces--enclosures surrounded by security fences. With the Liverpool terraces already dangerously overcrowded, the situation became exponentially worse when the police outside the stadium, fearing trouble, ordered an exit gate to be opened and 2,000 more fans rushed into the enclosures bypassing the turnstiles. The crush of the crowd caused fans already inside to be pushed and squeezed against the heavy metal fences and die of suffocation. Despite the constant pleas from fans for the police to open security gates to alleviate the pressure, the police on the other side of the fences did nothing. Some fans tried to escape by climbing into an upper deck. Others tried to scale the security fences. About six minutes into the match, the fans in the overcrowded terraces spilled over and through the fences causing the game to be stopped. Most of the fatalities died on the pitch without ever getting to a hospital. A coroner's report suggested that perhaps 40 of the fatalities could have been prevented with quick medical attention. Yet only two ambulances ever entered the stadium while others were stuck in a bottleneck outside the venue. Even with injured and dying fans being brought onto the pitch, most police officers were inexplicably more concerned with preventing rival Forest supporters from entering the field than assisting the injured. Initial reports wrongly blamed drunken and unruly fans for the catastrophe while exonerating the police's actions and inactions. Wildly inaccurate stories about fans pickpocketing the dead and interfering with rescue efforts were published in The Sun tabloid--a newspaper which is largely boycotted in Liverpool to this day. Later investigations indicated that a whitewash of the incident was orchestrated by the police, and rightly placed the blame on a paucity of law enforcement outside the stadium and a lack of police action when the situation on the terraces became dangerous. The ages of those killed ranged from 10 to 72. Eighty-nine of the 96 were males. One 10-year-old who died was the cousin of Steven Gerrard, who would later become Liverpool's captain. Terraces disappeared from most large British soccer venues shortly thereafter.
Tags: Hillsborough  disaster  England  soccer   
Added: 12th July 2014
Views: 1866
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Posted By: Lava1964
1940s Radio Broadcast - Bob Hope and Judy Garland This was broadcast on the, 'Command Performance,' show, Armed Forces Radio Network February 20, 1945 featuring Bob Hope and Judy Garland. There is a skit a the beginning and Judy sings a short parody, 'Over The Barrel', of, 'Over The Rainbow' and then she and Hope finish with with a portion of, I'm Gonna Go For You'. Perhaps I should say try to finish. Also, being a live program, mistakes are made but the performers continue with an entertaining show. You can also visit her music page at: http://www.thejudyroom.com/songs.html
Tags: Bob  Hope  Judy  Garland  Command  Performance  1945  Over  The  Rainbow  Over  The  Barrel  and  more 
Added: 7th November 2009
Views: 2054
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Posted By: jedwgrn

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