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Vanishing TV Character - Mr Barnsdahl Fans of The Lucy Show immediately think of Mr. Mooney (played by Gale Gordon) as the tight-fisted banker with whom Lucy Carmichael constantly clashed. However, Mr. Mooney was a second-season replacement for Mr. Barnsdahl, played by Charles Lane. Lane was a longtime character actor who specialized in playing officious, unlikable authority figures. A familiar face for generations of TV and movie fans, Lane's acting career began in 1929. Four years later he was a founding member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG). He was a favorite of director Frank Capra and became a good friend of Lucille Ball. He had roles in several episodes of I Love Lucy. (He was a fellow expectant father in the 1953 episode when Little Ricky is born.) When Lucy's second sitcom series, The Lucy Show, began in the fall of 1962, she played a widow who lived off a trust fund left to her by her late husband. Lane played Mr. Barnsdahl, the humorless, no-nonsense banker who managed the fund. Lane appeared in just four episodes, however. According to one book about Lucille Ball's sitcoms, Lane had difficulty remembering his lines when performing in front of a live audience and happily stepped aside for Gordon. (Shortly thereafter Lane was cast as heartless railroad official Homer Bedloe on Petticoat Junction--which was not shot in front of a live audience.) Another explanation for Lane's departure is that he was only an interim character until Gale Gordon--Lucy's first choice to play her banker--was freed from other contractual obligations and could become the miserly Mr. Mooney whom every Lucy fan remembers. Lane lived to be a centenarian, dying at age 102 in 2007. His last acting credit was as a narrator at age 101. He was the oldest SAG member at the time of his death.
Tags: Charles  Lane  Lucy  Show  Mr  Barnsdahl 
Added: 4th April 2018
Views: 536
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Fair Exchange - Failed Sitcom In September 1962 CBS unveiled something new--an hour-long sitcom titled Fair Exchange. Its premise was that an American family and a British family swapped teenage daughters for a year. Why? The two families' patriarchs had been Second World War flying buddies. The American daughter, Patty Walker, wanted to study in London, so the two families, in effect, arranged their own version of an exchange student program. (Judy Carne played the English teen, Heather Finch. It was her first American television role. Even though she played a teenager, Carne was 23 years old at the time.) The episodes generally focused on the difficulties each girl had adopting to the cultural differences of her new location. Filmed in both England and Hollywood, the 60-minute format proved too unwieldy and the show was canceled in December 1962. Three months later, after loyal fans put pressure on CBS, the network returned Fair Exchange to its schedule--but only in a revised half-hour format. Ratings did not merit the show continuing beyond one season, however. Fair Exchange was again cancelled before the 1963-64 TV season began after 27 episodes. Here is the opening montage for the 60-minute version.
Tags: Fair  Exchange  sitcom  Judy  Carne  CBS 
Added: 26th April 2018
Views: 518
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mickey Mantle Avoids DP - 1960 WS This is one of the smartest baserunning plays you'll ever see: It's Game #7 of the 1960 World Series. The New York Yankees are trailing the Pittsburgh Pirates by one run (9-8) with one out in the top of the ninth inning. Gil McDougald is on third base. Mickey Mantle is on first base. Yogi Berra hits a sharp ground ball to Pittsburgh first baseman Rocky Nelson. Nelson steps on first base for the second out of the inning. Mickey Mantle appears to be a dead duck for the Series-ending out, but with the force play now removed, he dives back into first base, eluding the surprised Nelson's tag. McDougald scored the game-tying run. (As any baseball fan worth his salt knows, the Pirates won the game in the bottom of the ninth inning when Bill Mazeroski led off with a home run.)
Tags: Mickey  Mantle  baserunning  baseball  1960  World  Series 
Added: 29th July 2018
Views: 565
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
10cc - I 'I'm Mandy, Fly Me' by Eric, Graham and Lol begins with the hook-line from 'Clockwork Creep' (on second album 'Sheet Music') and an airplane flying overhead before being swiped aside by a fat bass line, exotic synthesiser sound effects, a vocoder apparently whispering 'amazing grace' and whistling. We find out later that the airplane has crash-landed in the water, with the narrator thrown out of the plane (his first line is that he's 'on the outside looking in') but rather than sound petrified or angry, the narrator bobbing in the water is ecstatic. The poster he sees on the side of the aircraft, of an air-hostess named Mandy, 'with a smile as bright as sunshine' causes him to hallucinate (or so it seems) and takes him out of himself ('The world was spinning like a ball, and then it wasn't there at all!') Mandy gives him the 'kiss of life' that saves him, his addled brain setting off on a journey of exotic acoustic guitars and psychedelic effects that ends only when he's pulled from the wreckage; he asks for Mandy but she's not there. A love song to an imaginary person, created by a situation so intense and extreme that the 'real essence' of life comes into sharp contrast, 'Mandy' is balancing a lot of things for a humble catchy single. For a start we don't know who to believe: the narrator is clearly awake enough to realise that what's happening to him seems like a film (Mandy acts 'just like the girl in Dr No, no no no') and yet when he tells his rescuers later that it might have all been in his head they tell him 'no no no no' and that she was was real, yet currently missing - do they mean this? Or is that simply a ruse to keep him awake and conscious in the hope that the pair might be reunited? (note the sheer amount of denies in each of those two lines, the sort of things you do when you're lying to someone). The key line of this song is 'if your chance would you take it?' - would you be prepared to create a whole new life for yourself in your mind to keep yourself alive? And if you did, what would happen to you afterwards when you realised you were making it all up? It's interesting in this context that the band chose an 'air hostess' as their 'exotic woman' (the first in a whole sequence of imaginary confident Eric Stewart girls who'll end up seducing him on subways and all sorts in albums to come): air hostesses never seem quite real anyway, what with all that make-up and being made up to look the same. This clearly isn't a 'real' woman: she's the sort you see everywhere if you travel by plane a lot and even that name - Mandy - isn't a common one amongst 'real' people, though it's used a lot in books. The result is a fourth straight song in a row that's easy to admire and yet there's something difficult to fall in love with compared to earlier classic 10cc singles: there's too many questions and not enough answers for this to be an 'easy ride', with the sudden switch of gears every time the band break out for another instrumental making this song less easy on the ears than, say, 'I'm Not In Love' or 'Rubber Bullets'. Still, this is a lot of people's favourite 10cc song for a reason: its a love song told with such a radical twist that no one on first hearing could have heard it coming (if they'd understood it at all), traditionally loved by 'true' fans (although interestingly co-writer Lol Creme wasn't one of them; it was this song he quoted as evidence that the band were growing stale). In actuality 'Mandy' is a clever hybrid of catchy commercialism and bonkers uniqueness that couldn't possibly have been thought up by another band, but there are better mixtures of the same ingredients around, even on this same album.
Tags: 10cc,  Pop  Music,  Rock  Music,  1976 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 451
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Posted By: Maitlandsplace
Opie the Birdman - Final Scene The first episode of the fourth season of The Andy Griffith Show was Opie the Birdman (which first aired on September 30, 1963). The plot has Opie Taylor accidentally killing a mother bird with his slingshot. Opie decides to atone for his misdeed by taking care of the three baby birds found in the nest. Here is the final scene when Opie sets the birds free. In a 2009 poll, TV Guide ranked Opie the Birdman as the 18th best sitcom episode of all time!
Tags: Opie  The  Birdman  TAGS 
Added: 1st October 2018
Views: 651
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character- Larry Mondello Robert (Rusty) Stevens played Larry Mondello in 67 episodes of the first three seasons of Leave It To Beaver between 1957 and 1960. That meant he appeared in approximately 2/3 of those 102 shows. Larry was Beaver's best buddy. Good-natured, obese, but not the brightest kid on the planet, Larry often led Beaver into various messes. We never saw Larry's father, but his harried mother (played by Madge Blake) was constantly threatening Larry with the consequences of his iron-fisted pop laying down the law on him once he got home from another business trip. After the 1959-60 season, however, Larry just vanished from the sitcom. According to some reports, Rusty Stevens' father took a job in Pennsylvania. Thus the Stevens family was suddenly uprooted from California, which effectively ended Rusty's TV career. However, a few reports--including comments made by Barbara Billingsley (who played June Cleaver) late in her life--indicate that Stevens' mother was an insufferable stage mom whose presence and antics rankled the producers. Eventually the brains behind the show had had enough of her and decided abruptly to drop Larry Mondello from the show.
Tags: Larry  Mondello  Leave  It  to  Beaver  Rusty  Stevens 
Added: 26th October 2018
Views: 495
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dicovery - Sunday Morning Kids Show From October 1962 to September 1971, ABC aired a "highbrow series for children" called Discovery. Historical and cultural themes were emphasized in each program. In its first season it began as a 25-minute weekday series, but failed to attract much of an audience. In 1963 it switched to a Sunday morning timeslot where it remained for the duration of its run. Hosted by Virginia Gibson (later Bill Owen joined Gibson as a co-host), the show is fondly remembered by children of that era because it was, for years, the only network show that aired on Sunday mornings that was not an adult-oriented political or news panel show. Each year that Discovery aired it was followed by the last two digits of the year. He is the opening and closing of a Discovery '68 episode.
Tags: Discovery  children  TV  programming 
Added: 11th March 2019
Views: 331
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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