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Maureen Connolly - Tragic Tennis Star You can watch tennis for the next hundred years and you'll never witness anyone match the dominance that Maureen (Little Mo) Connolly had at the majors between 1951 and 1954. She entered nine Grand Slam singles events--and won every one. Connolly first took up tennis at the age of 10 at San Diego's public courts. Although she was naturally left-handed, her first coach, Wilbur Folsom, converted Connolly to a right-hander. She became an excellent baseline player who, despite her small 5'5" frame, could strike powerful shots with either her backhand or her forehand. By the time Connolly was 14, she was the junior (under 18) female champion of the United States. She began competing in adult events shortly thereafter. Connolly won Forest Hills (the amateur-era forerunner of the US Open) just before her 17th birthday in 1951. In 1952 Connolly won both Wimbledon and Forest Hills. She didn't enter the French or Australian championships. In 1953, however, Connolly entered all four major championships and took them all, becoming the first female to achieve the calendar Grand Slam--a feat that's only been equaled twice in all the years since. In capturing the Grand Slam, Connolly lost just a single set in the four tourneys (to Susan Chatrier in a quarterfinal match in Paris). Entering the 1953 Wimbledon final, Connolly had only dropped eight games in five matches! At the Australian Championships, Connolly only lost 10 games in six matches before the final! Connolly began 1954 just as strongly. She successfully defended both her French and Wimbledon titles. Sadly, about two weeks after her third successive Wimbledon triumph, Connolly was badly injured in a horseback riding mishap when her horse was spooked by a passing cement truck. Her right leg was so badly fractured that it was nearly amputated. She was not quite 20 years old but her tennis career was over. In her nine Grand Slam singles finals, Connolly dropped just one set--and that was in her first one. Shortly after announcing her retirement from competitive tennis in 1955, Connolly married Norman Brinker, who had been a member of the American equestrian team at the 1952 Olympics. They had two daughters. Connolly was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1966. She battled the disease for three years before succumbing to it on June 21, 1969. She was just 34 years old.
Tags: tennis  Maureen  Connolly  grand  slam  champion 
Added: 17th September 2017
Views: 220
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Posted By: Lava1964
George W. Bush -  First Pitch 2001 WS Ceremonial first pitches at baseball games usually don't have a lot of significance, but that was not the case on October 30, 2001. Before Game #3 of the World Series, President George W. Bush was ushered into Yankee Stadium amid enormous security to do the honors at the first major sports event in New York City since the 9/11 terror attacks. Here is the story of what went on behind the scenes.
Tags: baseball  first  pitch  2001  World  Series  President  Bush 
Added: 22nd October 2017
Views: 51
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gordon Griffith - First Movie Tarzan Most film history sources will list Elmo Lincoln as the first actor to play Tarzan on screen (in the 1918 silent film Tarzan of the Apes). That's not entirely true. In that same silent film, a 10-year-old boy named Gordon Griffith played the young Tarzan well before Lincoln appeared on the screen. It was a challenging role for the boy actor. Griffith was required to do his own climbing and acrobatic stunts and interact with live chimpanzees--which he did excellently. True to the Edgar Rice Burroughs book, Tarzan wore no clothes as a youth, so most of Griffith's scenes were shot with him totally nude. There was no national film code in 1918, but some scenes that showed too much of Griffith from the front were cut by local censors, including those in Chicago. Thus the public domain prints of the movie vary in length and in the amount of time Griffith was on the screen. Griffith, who like Tarzan lost both his parents at a young age, spent most of his life in the movie industry. He died in 1958 of a heart attack at the age of 51.
Tags: first  film  Tarzan  Gordon  Griffith 
Added: 20th November 2017
Views: 57
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Posted By: Lava1964
First Name of Lt Columbo During the long run that Peter Falk's beloved Columbo detective mysteries had on both NBC and ABC, Lt. Columbo's name was supposedly never revealed. In one episode, Columbo is asked if he has a first name. The detective coyly replied, "Only my wife uses it." However, Columbo's name was revealed in two NBC episodes via quick glances at his LAPD ID. In both Dead Weight and A Matter of Honor, Columbo's ID is shown onscreen just long enough for eagle-eyed viewers to see that it his first name is Frank. However, many trivia buffs wrongly believe Columbo's first name was Phillip. Why? Despite having zero evidence to back up his assertion, Fred L. Worth, the author of a trivia book, wrote that Columbo's first name was Phillip. This factoid was seized upon by the creators of Trivia Pursuit--and it appeared as a question in the first edition of the game. Worth attempted to sue the Trivial Pursuit people for copyright violation, but facts--even bogus ones--are not protected by copyright.
Tags: Columbo  first  name  Frank 
Added: 25th November 2017
Views: 75
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stanford Indians From 1930 to 1972 Stanford University's varsity sports teams were known as the Indians. (At the 1971 Rose Bowl game, the cheerleaders were dressed in native costumes for the band's halftime show.) However, pressure by native American groups, who claimed the nickname was demeaning and insensitive to their heritage, caused the University to change it to Cardinals in 1975. (The new name had nothing to do with the bird, but rather the cardinal red color of the uniforms.) The move was quite controversial. For the first few years there was annual pressure to reinstate the Indians name and logo. However, in 1975 Stanford's board of governors declared the disavowal of the Indians nickname to be irrevocable. The singular Cardinal nickname was officially adopted in 1990. Still there are some old fans and alumni who pine for the return of the Indian logo and name.
Tags: Stanford  Indians  nickname 
Added: 2nd December 2017
Views: 37
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Posted By: Lava1964
1966 Notre Dame-MSU 10-10 Tie This is a highlight clip of one of the most eagerly anticipated NCAA football games of all time. It occurred late in the 1966 season on November 19 when the undefeated Fighting Irish of Notre Dame traveled to East Lansing, MI to play the undefeated Michigan State Spartans. The attendance at Spartan Stadium was officially listed as 80,011, but it was likely higher. The well played game finished inconclusively in a 10-10 tie. The game ended somewhat controversially. Notre Dame had the ball at is own 30-yard line with 1:24 to play. They converted a fourth-and-one for a first down but then the Irish conservatively ran out to clock on two plays to preserve the tie. The tie ended Michigan State's 1966 schedule, but Notre Dame still had one more game on its slate--a road game the following Saturday at the Los Angeles Coliseum versus Southern California. Notre Dame easily rolled to a 51-0 win over the Trojans and won the 1966 national championship.
Tags: 1966  NCAA  football  Notre  Dame  Michigan  State  10-10  tie 
Added: 10th December 2017
Views: 24
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Posted By: Lava1964

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