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Name The Two Baseball Figures Who are these two Hall Of Famers?
Tags: Who  are  they 
Added: 4th December 2008
Views: 622
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tales of Brer Rabbit Song of the South My favorite Disney flick as a kid. It figures it's the only one. I think that they haven't released on DVD. Politicely correct folks wont allow it. Go figure.
Tags: Zippa  a  de  do  da  Tales  of  Brer  Rabbit  Disney  Movies  Disney  World  Song  of  the  South 
Added: 12th February 2010
Views: 1249
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Posted By: Marty6697
Ernie Harwell Dies The Detroit Tigers say longtime broadcaster Ernie Harwell has died today (May 4, 2010). He was 92. Harwell called Tigers games for more than four decades and was one of Michigan's most beloved sports figures. Spokesman Brian Britten said Tuesday that the team learned about Harwell's death from his agent. Harwell announced in September 2009 that he had been diagnosed with inoperable cancer of the bile duct. Harwell started with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948 and continued with the New York Giants and Baltimore Orioles before joining the Tigers in 1960. The Baseball Hall of Fame honored Harwell in 1981 with the Ford C. Frick Award, given annually to a broadcaster for major contributions to baseball. The Detroit Free Press said Harwell died at his home in Novi, Michigan.
Tags: baseball  Ernie  Harwell  broadcaster  death 
Added: 4th May 2010
Views: 760
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Posted By: Lava1964
Beatrix Schuba - Figure Skater Austria's Beatrix (Trixi) Schuba was singlehandedly responsible for changing the scoring rules of figure skating--because she was so boring. Schuba won the women's world championship in both 1971 and 1972 and the gold medal at the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. At the time 'compulsory figures' (also known as 'school figures') counted for a huge percentage of a skater's score and gave the sport its name. These consisted of skaters tracing patterns along the ice. Schuba was totally dominant at this aspect of her sport, but she was only a mediocre performer in the free skate. At the 1972 world championships in Calgary, Schuba had such a commanding lead after the compulsory figures that all she needed to do to win was show up for the free skate. That's basically what Schuba did. She came on the ice and skated only for a few seconds--but it was good enough for gold. The goings-on did not sit well with television audiences nor with the crowd in Calgary who felt Canada's Karen Magnussen, an excellent free skater, had been robbed of the gold medal. The next year FIS added a short program to the championships to reduce the importance of the compulsory figures. Schuba opted to retire. Compulsory figures were discontinued altogether in 1990.
Tags: Beatrix  Schuba  figure  skating 
Added: 6th June 2010
Views: 2564
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cigar Store Indians Cigar store Indians (or wooden Indians) were used by tobacconists as garish advertising figures. At one point in the late nineteenth century, the cigar store Indian was a tobacco icon much like striped poles were for barber shops or three gold balls were for pawn shops. The figures were often three-dimensional wooden sculptures several feet tall; some were life-sized. They were first utilized because of the general illiteracy of the populace. American Indians and tobacco had always been associated. Since Indians had introduced tobacco to Europeans, the depiction of native people on smoke-shop signs was inevitable. As early as the seventeenth century, European tobacconists used figures of American Indians to advertise their shops. The statues began to lose their prominence in twentieth century America largely because cities began restricting the presence of intrusive objects on public sidewalks. Most surviving figures are museum pieces and collectors' items.
Tags: cigar  store  Indian 
Added: 20th June 2010
Views: 1486
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bill Gallo Passes at age 88 Bill Gallo, a cartoonist and columnist for the New York Daily News, whose playful characters included that of New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner as General Von Steingrabber, has died. He was 88. Gallo, who worked for the paper for seven decades, died Tuesday from complications of pneumonia at White Plains Hospital, the News reported Tuesday. "His death closed a chapter in the storied history of The News," said Daily News Chairman and publisher Mortimer Zuckerman told the paper. "The passing of our great cartoonist, colleague and friend Bill Gallo marks the end of an era." Gallo profiled in ink and sometimes in words most of the great sports figures of the past century, going back to Jack Dempsey, Man O' War, Jesse Owens and Dizzy Dean and his St. Louis Cardinals' Gas House Gang. The latter were his secret heroes, he told The Associated Press in an interview in 2000, secret because he devoted a lifetime at a drawing bo ard to amusing New York's rabidly loyal sports fans.
Tags: Bill  Gallo,  New  York  Daily  News,  Mortimer  Zuckerman,  New  York  Mets,  Basement  Bertha 
Added: 12th May 2011
Views: 879
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Posted By: Old Fart
GI Joe Nurse Doll One of the most spectacular failures in toy history was the G.I. Joe Nurse figure. In 1967 Hasbro expanded its line of successful G.I. Joe toys. One was the G.I. Nurse Action Girl, a doll so rare that certain models in mint condition still in the box can bring up to $6,000 on todayís collectorsí market. 'The G.I. Joe Nurse is so valuable today because it was released for only one year,' says Sharon Korbeck, editorial director of Toy Shop, a biweekly magazine aimed at toy collectors. 'The figure didnít do very well. Boys werenít interested in a female doll, and girls werenít interested in anything related to G.I. Joe.' Sales also suffered because toy store managers didnít know how to position the doll. Some put her with the G.I. Joe action figures, while others stocked her next to Barbie and her friends. Either way, 50 percent of the prospective market was lost. There are actually two G.I. Joe Nurse figures: one has a dark-colored bag. The other has a white bag. An example of the rarer white-bag doll was highlighted on a season-four episode of Pawn Stars.
Tags: GI  Joe  nurse 
Added: 28th May 2011
Views: 13654
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Posted By: Lava1964
1896 Five-Dollar Silver Certificate Controversy A new series of $1, $2 and $5 banknotes were printed by the U.S. government in 1896. Known to collectors as the "educational series," the banknotes used classical art motifs to promote advancements in science. For example, the $5 silver certificate's design (shown below) highlighted the new importance that electricity brought to modern society. However, the naked breasts on the female figures sent some prudish folks into a tizzy. Some merchants and bankers in Boston considered the $5 bills to be obscene and refused to accept them--thus creating the term 'banned in Boston.' Despite the controversy, many banknote collectors consider the 1896 series to be the most beautiful ever produced by the U.S. government.
Tags: 1896  banknotes  numismatics  controversy 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 2765
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Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Announcerless Telecast - 1980 "We are just moments away from the kickoff of today's Jets-Dolphins game and a telecast that figures to be different. The fact that we try something different--and dare to--has been greeted with almost every kind of reaction, from good-natured humor to applause to some surprising anger." That's how NBC's Bryant Gumbel's introduced what was about to happen on Saturday, December 20, 1980: NBC was going to broadcast an entire NFL game from Miami's Orange Bowl with neither a play-by-play announcer nor an analyst. It was a meaningless, season-ending game for two mediocre NFL teams, but Don Ohlmeyer (pictured here) turned it into a happening. Ohlmeyer was the first producer of Monday Night Football. He produced and directed three Olympics, won 16 Emmy awards, and is a member of the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Based on his years of experience, Ohlmeyer always believed that sports announcers talked too much. Here was an attention-seeking vehicle that would drive that point home. Ohlmeyer also thought the gimmick might be a way to boost ratings points out of an otherwise unattractive matchup. Dick Enberg, who was one of NBC's lead football announcers at the time, was not amused. He was worried. "My first reaction was of incredible nervousness," he recalled. "We're paid to talk, so all of us want to fill the air with lots of exciting words. We all gathered together, hoping that Ohlmeyer was dead wrong. I mean, he was flirting with the rest of our lives. What if this crazy idea really worked?" The game, won by the New York Jets 24-17, featured only sounds that could be picked up by on-field microphones, the referee's calls, plus the usual announcements from the Orange Bowl's stadium announcer. To compensate for the absence of TV announcers, NBC went overboard on its graphics and pre-recorded soundbites of players and coaches. It was a onetime experiment that was largely mocked by TV critics. Surprisingly, though, comments received at NBC's switchboard were about 60% favorable.
Tags: NFL  NBC  announcerless  telecast  Don  Ohlmeyer 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 1442
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Marshall SI Cover Mike Marshall of the Los Angeles Dodgers (shown here on an SI cover) was the National League's Cy Young Award winner in 1974. He finished third in league MVP voting as well. A screwball pitcher, the indefatigable Marshall appeared in 106 games in 1974. Thirteen of those appearances were in consecutive games. Both marks are modern MLB records. Marshall was a bit of an eccentric for his day. He was a student of kinesiology and nearly quit baseball after 1974 to pursue his PhD. He believes that proper mechanics can totally eliminate pitchers' arm injuries. He was also dead set against signing autographs--especially for kids. Why the reluctance to sign? Marshall believed professional baseball players should not be revered as heroic figures by children. (The Cincinnati Reds, the "establishment team" of the 1970s, loathed Marshall because of his no-autograph policy--and because he made the difference in the Dodgers winnng the 1974 NL West title instead of the Reds.) The scarcity of Marshall's autograph makes it valuable and desirable to collectors. More often than not, the rare specimens of it are written as "Dr. Mike Marshall."
Tags: baseball  Mike  Marshall  SI  cover 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 997
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Posted By: Lava1964

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