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NBA Shot Clock Invented 1954 It was the innovation that saved professional basketball: The 24-second shot clock. Coach Howard Hobson came up with with the idea of a shot clock, but it was first used in 1954 in Syracuse, New York. There Danny Biasone, the owner of the National Basketball Association's Syracuse Nationals, experimented with a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. He then convinced the NBA to adopt it. In the pre-shot clock days, the NBA had problems attracting fans and television coverage. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they took the lead. Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball in the front court endlessly without penalty. If the team in the lead chose to stall, the trailing team was forced to commit fouls to get the ball back following the free throw. Low-scoring, boring games with many fouls were common. The most extreme case occurred on November 22, 1950, when the Fort Wayne Pistons defeated the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. A few weeks later, the Rochester Royals and Indianapolis Olympians played a soporific six-overtime game with only one shot in each overtime. The NBA tried several rule changes in the early 1950s to speed up the game and reduce fouls before eventually adopting Biasone's idea. How did Biasone arrive at the strange figure of 24 seconds? According to Biasone, 'I looked at the box scores from games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes--2,880 seconds--and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot.' When the shot clock first came into vogue, it made players so nervous that it hardly came into play; players were generally taking fewer than 20 seconds to shoot. According to Syracuse player Dolph Schayes, 'We thought we had to take quick shots. But as time went on, we saw the inherent genius in Danny's 24 seconds. You could work the ball around for a good shot.'
Tags: NBA  shot  clock 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 3681
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tonya Harding Then and Now Tonya Harding is a former American figure skating champion. In 1991 she won the U.S. Figure Skating Championships and placed second in the World Championships. She became famous after her ex-husband Jeff Gillooly conspired with Shawn Eckhardt and Shane Stant to attack competitor Nancy Kerrigan at a practice session during the 1994 U.S. Figure Skating Championships.
Tags: Tonya  Harding  Nancy  Kerrigan  U.S.  Figure  Skating  Championships  figure  skating  champion  Jeff  Gillooly  Shawn  Eckhardt    1994 
Added: 18th November 2009
Views: 6842
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Posted By: Cliffy
Keith Olbermann Tribute to Gordie Howe In late 2014, news that 86-year-old hockey great Gordie Howe was ailing prompted ESPN's Keith Olbermann to create this excellent tribute to a beloved sports figure. (By the way, despite a dire prognosis, Gordie pulled through and is still with us as of September 2015.)
Tags: hocky  Gordie  Howe  tribute  Keith  Olbermann 
Added: 5th September 2015
Views: 1045
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Posted By: Lava1964
 Soul singer Teddy Pendergrass passes away at 59 Teddy Pendergrass, who became R&B;'s reigning sex symbol in the 1970s and '80s with his forceful, masculine voice and passionate love ballads and later became an inspirational figure after suffering a devastating car accident that left him paralyzed, died Wednesday at age 59. The singer's son, Teddy Pendergrass II, said his father died at a hospital in suburban Philadelphia. The singer underwent colon cancer surgery eight months ago and had "a difficult recovery," his son said. "To all his fans who loved his music, thank you," his son said. "He will live on through his music."
Tags: Teddy    Pendergrass    soul    R&B    passes  away  at  59   
Added: 14th January 2010
Views: 1298
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Posted By: Old Fart
Tales of Brer Rabbit Song of the South My favorite Disney flick as a kid. It figures it's the only one. I think that they haven't released on DVD. Politicely correct folks wont allow it. Go figure.
Tags: Zippa  a  de  do  da  Tales  of  Brer  Rabbit  Disney  Movies  Disney  World  Song  of  the  South 
Added: 12th February 2010
Views: 1673
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Posted By: Marty6697
Can You Figure Out Who this Voice Belongs to After beginning his television career in the 1960’s with many a guest spot, along with the occasional film role, this mystery “singer” received his big claim to fame as – technically - the second banana in a (mostly) 1970’s TV series which ran for seven seasons. Now, as to his singing ability….. Wow-! Almost makes one long for the scintillating song stylings of Telly Savalas.
Tags: Chad  Everett  Medical  Center 
Added: 19th February 2010
Views: 1052
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Posted By: nanook
Barbara Ann Scott Canada's Barabara Ann Scott is photographed doing a 'stag leap' in this photograph from December 1947. Two months later, at age 19, she would win the women's figure skating gold medal at the 1948 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland. At the opening ceremonies for the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, the 81-year-old Scott was one of the dignitaries who brought the Olympic flag into the stadium.
Tags: Barbara  Ann  Scott  figure  skater  Olympics 
Added: 18th February 2010
Views: 1885
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ernie Harwell Dies The Detroit Tigers say longtime broadcaster Ernie Harwell has died today (May 4, 2010). He was 92. Harwell called Tigers games for more than four decades and was one of Michigan's most beloved sports figures. Spokesman Brian Britten said Tuesday that the team learned about Harwell's death from his agent. Harwell announced in September 2009 that he had been diagnosed with inoperable cancer of the bile duct. Harwell started with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948 and continued with the New York Giants and Baltimore Orioles before joining the Tigers in 1960. The Baseball Hall of Fame honored Harwell in 1981 with the Ford C. Frick Award, given annually to a broadcaster for major contributions to baseball. The Detroit Free Press said Harwell died at his home in Novi, Michigan.
Tags: baseball  Ernie  Harwell  broadcaster  death 
Added: 4th May 2010
Views: 1173
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Posted By: Lava1964
Beatrix Schuba - Figure Skater Austria's Beatrix (Trixi) Schuba was singlehandedly responsible for changing the scoring rules of figure skating--because she was so boring. Schuba won the women's world championship in both 1971 and 1972 and the gold medal at the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. At the time 'compulsory figures' (also known as 'school figures') counted for a huge percentage of a skater's score and gave the sport its name. These consisted of skaters tracing patterns along the ice. Schuba was totally dominant at this aspect of her sport, but she was only a mediocre performer in the free skate. At the 1972 world championships in Calgary, Schuba had such a commanding lead after the compulsory figures that all she needed to do to win was show up for the free skate. That's basically what Schuba did. She came on the ice and skated only for a few seconds--but it was good enough for gold. The goings-on did not sit well with television audiences nor with the crowd in Calgary who felt Canada's Karen Magnussen, an excellent free skater, had been robbed of the gold medal. The next year FIS added a short program to the championships to reduce the importance of the compulsory figures. Schuba opted to retire. Compulsory figures were discontinued altogether in 1990.
Tags: Beatrix  Schuba  figure  skating 
Added: 6th June 2010
Views: 3451
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cigar Store Indians Cigar store Indians (or wooden Indians) were used by tobacconists as garish advertising figures. At one point in the late nineteenth century, the cigar store Indian was a tobacco icon much like striped poles were for barber shops or three gold balls were for pawn shops. The figures were often three-dimensional wooden sculptures several feet tall; some were life-sized. They were first utilized because of the general illiteracy of the populace. American Indians and tobacco had always been associated. Since Indians had introduced tobacco to Europeans, the depiction of native people on smoke-shop signs was inevitable. As early as the seventeenth century, European tobacconists used figures of American Indians to advertise their shops. The statues began to lose their prominence in twentieth century America largely because cities began restricting the presence of intrusive objects on public sidewalks. Most surviving figures are museum pieces and collectors' items.
Tags: cigar  store  Indian 
Added: 20th June 2010
Views: 2026
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Posted By: Lava1964

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