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1952 Christmas Fashions This fashion layout is from the December 1952 Seventeen magazine page 64 featuring moon-glazed fabrics and picturesque date dresses spun with light that shimmers at every turn. Don't teens looked more mature in those days. The magazine's descriptions are full of poetry. A beam of sheer white organdy. Rayon taffeta with the rustle of Christmas wrappings. Here it seems that 1952 is a quieter, more gentle time...except for all of that rustling taffeta!
Tags: 1952  fashions 
Added: 7th January 2011
Views: 3362
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Jack Lalanne Passes Today At Age 96 Jack LaLanne, the fitness guru and tireless television exercise-show host who demonstrated jumping jacks and push-ups while touting low-sugar diets and weight training long before they were fashionable, has died. He was 96. LaLanne died of pneumonia today at his home in Morro Bay, California, the Associated Press reported, citing his agent, Rick Hersh. LaLanne, who sometimes referred to himself as the Godfather of Fitness, was a TV pioneer in 1951 when he hosted one of the first exercise programs. His following grew when “The Jack LaLanne Show” was syndicated nationally from 1956 to 1970. The muscular host demonstrated calisthenics while amusing the home audience with his patter: “Ten seconds on the lips and a lifetime on the hips” and “Your waistline is your lifeline.”
Tags: Jack  Lalanne  Passes  Today  At  Age  96  exercise  guru  fingertip  pushups  health   
Added: 24th January 2011
Views: 1232
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Posted By: Old Fart
Civil War News Trading Cards Civil War News was a set of 88 collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists. The card set was characterized by vivid colors, graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (card #21 'Painful Death' being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person. The information was presented in newspaper-article fashion complete with a headline. The complete set of cards, including a checklist, was first printed for the American market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada. A&BC produced the sets in England. The cards came five to a wax pack with a stick of bubble gum. Also included in each package was a facsimile of Confederate paper currency. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips.
Tags: trading  cards  Civil  War  News 
Added: 9th February 2011
Views: 5735
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lawn Darts Remember Lawn Darts? Also known as Jarts or yard darts, they were a popular game at picnics and in backyards during the 1970s and into the 1980s. A typical set consisted of four to eight darts comprised of two different colors along with two plastic rings. The rings were placed a reasonable distance apart and served as targets for the darts. Rules varied from place to place, but the game was scored in a similar fashion to bocce or horseshoe-pitching. A game could be played as a one-on-one singles match or with partners. The metal tips were designed to dig into the lawn when they landed. Of course, they could also dig into somebody's flesh if the darts were thrown recklessly. In December 1988 the sale of the metal-tipped lawn darts was banned in the United States. Canada banned them the following year. Since then, safer forms of 'lawn darts' have proved to be very unpopular with consumers. Quality sets of the metal-tipped lawn darts are prized by collectors.
Tags: lawn  darts  recreation   
Added: 15th February 2011
Views: 6234
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Posted By: Lava1964
Queen For A Day Total Television calls Queen For A Day, '...possibly the most maudlin game show ever broadcast'--and for good reason. Considered a forerunner of modern-day reality TV, QFAD was a successful radio program beginning in 1945 before airing on daytime television from 1956 through 1964. At the peak of the show's popularity in the late 1950s, NBC expanded it from 30 to 45 minutes to sell more commercials, at a then-premium rate of $4,000 per minute. QFAD opened with host Jack Bailey asking the largely female studio audience, 'Would YOU like to be queen for a day?' After this, the contestants were introduced and interviewed. Each contestant talked about recent financial and emotional hard times she had been through. The sob stories were rated on an applause meter. Bailey began each interview gently, asking the contestant first about her life and family, and maintaining a positive and upbeat response no matter what she told him. The interview climaxed with Bailey asking the contestant what she needed most and why she wanted to win the title of Queen for a Day. Often the request was for medical care or therapeutic equipment to help a chronically ill child, but sometimes it was as simple as the need for a hearing aid, a new washing machine, or a refrigerator. Many women broke down sobbing as they described their plights, and Bailey was always quick to comfort them and offer a clean white handkerchief to dry their eyes. The more pitiful the story a contestant had, the likelier the studio audience was to reach the applause meter's highest level. The winner, to the musical accompaniment of Pomp and Circumstance, would be draped in a sable-trimmed red velvet robe, given a glittering jeweled crown to wear, placed on a velvet-upholstered throne, and handed a dozen long-stemmed roses to hold as she wept, often uncontrollably, while her list of prizes was announced. The prizes began with the necessary help the woman had requested, but might include a vacation, a night on the town with her husband or escort, silver-plated flatware, an array of kitchen appliances, and a selection of fashion clothing. The losing contestants were each given smaller prizes; no one went away from the show without a meaningful gift. Bailey's trademark sign-off was 'This is Jack Bailey, wishing we could make every woman a queen--for every single day!' A 1970 short-lived syndicated revival of QFAD quickly fell into disfavor with viewers when it was revealed the 'contestants' were actually actresses.
Tags: Queen  For  A  Day  reality  TV  game  show 
Added: 24th February 2011
Views: 1706
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Posted By: Lava1964
1948 Easter Present As seen in the March 1948 issue of Seventeen magazine. A dress ad employing product placement (Pepsi), and showing an Easter bunny that looks a little like Chucky from the 1988 film Child's Play. LOL
Tags: 1948  Easter  fashions   
Added: 9th April 2011
Views: 1522
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Easter Fashions 1948 From the pages of Seventeen magazine, March, 1948, a photograph by famed Cosmopolitan magazine cover photographer (for over 30-years starting in 1965)Francesco Scavullo.
Tags: 1948  Easter  Fashions  Scavullo  SeventeenMagazine 
Added: 10th April 2011
Views: 2780
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Posted By: AngoraSox
1964 Fashions and Cars Frothy souffle textures revved up in shades of gold will get the attention of that Big Wheel in your life, according to this 1964 ad from the August Seventeen magazine. And it looks like the British Motor Corporation is willing to take that risk! And there is Ford Model Agency's model Colleen Corby in blue, wearing one of the vervy, vivid trio of sweaters to prove it! The guy double parked next to her doesn't stand a chance. Sigh. Such was the summer of '64.
Tags: fashions  cars  Sixties  ColleenCorby  SeventeenMagazine  VintageMagazines  1964Fashions  BritishMotorCorporation  FordModelAgency   
Added: 25th June 2011
Views: 1978
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Posted By: AngoraSox
1964 Hair Curlers Each size hair curler in this 1964 ad by Tip-Top is COLOR CODED. An entire rainbow of colors! But the ad assures that the conservative among us can still purchase these in brown. LOL The Tip-Top company had an unbelievable array of very affordable beauty products at Woolworths and drugstores.
Tags: 1964  fashion  beauty  curlers  TipTop  SeventeenMagazine  teenagers  hairstyles  hairdos  HairProducts   
Added: 26th June 2011
Views: 4079
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Posted By: AngoraSox
1964 Hair Accessories From the November 1964 Seventeen magazine, selling straight out of Beverly Hills, a replica garbage can container for hair curlers for "the glamour girl".
Tags: 1964  beauty  hairdos  hairstyles  BeautyAccessories  SeventeenMagazine  teenagers  haircurlers  BeverlyHills  GarbageCan  glamour  teens  1964teens  fashion  1964Fashions   
Added: 26th June 2011
Views: 1661
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Posted By: AngoraSox

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