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Jesse James Exhumation - 1995 Notorious outlaw Jesse James was shot to death at close range by Bob Ford, a fellow gang member, on April 3, 1882. Ford had hoped to collect a sizable reward by offing James. Instead, Ford got himself a first-degree murder conviction--for which he was swiftly pardoned--and a place in western folklore. Rumors began almost immediately that James' death had been faked and he was living quietly away from the limelight. In 1995--some 113 years after a bullet entered his skull, James' body was exhumed from its supposed final resting place in Kearney, MO so DNA samples could be matched against those of his living descendants. The tests scientifically proved that the man buried in James' grave was, in fact, Jesse James. Locals cashed in on the exhumation frenzy by selling t-shirts to curiosity seekers that said, "We dig Jesse!"
Tags: Jesse  James  exhumation 
Added: 3rd October 2012
Views: 3362
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Posted By: Lava1964
Exhumation of President Taylor - 1991 President Zachary Taylor became the second American chief executive to die in office when he succumbed to gastro-intestinal problems on July 9, 1850 at age 65. Known for generally having robust health, Taylor had been ill for five days with severe stomach cramps and diarrhea. The cause may have been Taylor's overindulging in cherries covered in iced milk following a Fourth of July ceremony on the site where the Washington Monument was going to be erected. Doctors tried to cure the president with blood-letting and laxatives, but to no avail. The cause of Taylor's death was officially listed as "cholera morbus"--which apparently was an all-purpose answer whenever someone died suddenly from digestive problems in the middle of the 19th century. There was no autopsy. The dead president's body was preserved in ice for five days but never embalmed. More than 140 years later a historian named Clara Rising claimed Taylor had actually been poisoned by arsenic, perhaps by political enemies. (Taylor, despite being a slaveholder, was an outspoken pro-Union man. He had threatened to use the army to quash any secessionist movements.) Rising's compelling arguments--plus her willingness to pay $1200 in fees--persuaded officials in Kentucky to exhume Taylor's body from his crypt and perform modern scientific tests on it. The exhumation was carried out on June 18, 1991 with about 200 curious onlookers watching silently from a respectful distance. Modern forensic examination of Taylor's fingernails, sideburns, and even pubic hair showed no signs of arsenic poison whatsoever. Taylor was re-interred alongside his wife at Zachary Taylor National Cemetery in Louisville, KY. Today the medical community believes that the purgatives that Taylor was given by his physician to cleanse his system may have contained mercury which may have hastened the president's demise.
Tags: exhumation  Zachary  Taylor 
Added: 19th July 2015
Views: 1696
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Posted By: Lava1964
1901 Exhumation of Abraham Lincoln Here's a weird factoid: Since his assassination in 1865, Abraham Lincoln's remains have been exhumed or disinterred 17 times--and his coffin has been opened five times. Some of the exhumations have been totally understandable. His body was moved in and out of several temporary vaults while awaiting "permanent" burial. One unplanned exhumation happened in 1876. Lincoln's coffin was removed from its marble sarcophagus by a group of grave robbers who were caught almost immediately. Other times the Lincoln Tomb fell into a state of disrepair because the ground in was built upon was too soft. Thus Lincoln's body was removed and shabbily stored in the structure's basement pending the reconstruction work. Each time the coffin itself was actually disturbed, the guardians insisted on opening the casket to ensure Lincoln's remains were actually still inside. The last time this occurred was in 1901 when more renovations were done on Lincoln's deteriorating tomb to make the location more visitor friendly. Lincoln's coffin--which had been encased in a steel cage and buried beneath 10 feet of concrete as a means of discouraging grave robbers--was once more exhumed during the renovations. About 23 workers were on hand to see Lincoln re-interred one last time on September 26, 1901. Out of curiosity they checked the coffin once more to see if Abe was still there. He was. Although his face had turned a chalky white color, the corpse was remarkably well preserved after more than 36 years. Witnesses said that Lincoln's eyebrows were missing and the gloves upon his hands had rotted. Otherwise the face was instantly recognizable to anyone who had ever seen a photo of the famous president. It still bore the famous whiskers, mole, and a full head of wiry hair. The suit Lincoln was buried in--the same one he had worn to his 1865 inauguration--was still intact although it was covered in a fine yellow mold. There were also shreds of a disintegrated American flag upon the corpse. The last living person to have seen Lincoln's corpse was a 14-year-old boy named Fleetwood Lindley. Lindley's father had been one of the construction workers and had urged him to leave school early that day and go to Lincoln's Tomb to see something he would never forget. The boy was also permitted to hold one of the straps that lowered Lincoln's coffin back into its concrete cocoon. Interviewed by the Chicago Tribune about the experience in 1962, Lindley said seeing Lincoln's corpse did not bother him at first, but he said he had trouble sleeping for months afterward. Lindley died in February 1963 at the age of 75 just a few days after giving a final interview on the subject.
Tags: Abraham  Lincoln  exhumation  1901 
Added: 21st July 2015
Views: 1780
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Posted By: Lava1964

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