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Captain Pugwash captain pugwash first screened on british TV in 1957. He was the master of the Black Pig, is a rotund and somewhat less than fearsome pirate, who nevertheless engages in the usual piratical activies involving lost treasures and so forth. His arch enemy is Cut-Throat Jake, captain of The Flying Dustbin. Despite his blustering optimism and self-importance, Pugwash is usually unobtrusively saved from catastrophe by Tom the Cabin Boy.
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Added: 8th July 2007
Views: 2245
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Posted By: konifur
W.W. II Lockheed P-38 Ad Here’s one of many examples of our country's ‘hometown’ moral support ads during WWII. This one features a Lockheed P-38 Lightning. This ad appeared in Life Magazine and Popular Mechanics in 1942. Go get’em Maj. Richard Bong! (Richard Ira Bong was America's all-time Ace of Aces, downing 40 enemy planes in the Pacific theater of the war while flying P-38 fighter planes. Bong was killed August 6, 1945, the day the Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, when the P-80 Shooting Star he was testing for Lockheed stalled and crashed on take-off.)
Tags: Richard  Bong  Lockheed  WWII  Ad  Plane  Hero 
Added: 19th August 2007
Views: 2754
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Tokio Kid WWII Propaganda Posters During the Second World War, the U.S. government produced a series of anti-Japanese propaganda posters featuring a caricature dubbed the Tokio Kid. (Tokio was a common spelling of Tokyo at the time.) These posters, featuring absurd exaggerations of Asian facial features and pidgin English, warned Americans that wasteful habits and slacking off on the job could aid the enemy.
Tags: Tokio  Kid  propaganda  Second  World  War 
Added: 2nd March 2011
Views: 7235
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Posted By: Lava1964
Did This Scare You Out of the Water For anyone who hasn't seen this film, Jaws is a 1975 thriller directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchley's best-selling novel inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. Jaws bears similarities to several literary and artistic works, most notably Moby-Dick by Herman Melville. The character of Quint strongly resembles Captain Ahab, the obsessed captain of the Pequod who devotes his life to hunting a sperm whale. Quint's monologue reveals his similar vendetta against sharks, and even his boat, the Orca, is named after the only natural enemy of sharks. A direct reference to these similarities may be found in the original screenplay, which introduced Quint by showing him watching the film version of Moby-Dick. His laughter throughout made people get up and leave the theater (Wesley Strick's screenplay for Cape Fear featured a similar scene). However, the scene from Moby-Dick could not be licensed from Gregory Peck, the owner of the rights. The final scenes of the film, in which the men chase the shark and try to harpoon it with flotation barrels, parallel the chase for Moby-Dick in the novel. We have this in our library and watch it usually once a month. There's something about this film that sticks in my memory, and no, I never went back into the water.
Tags: jaws  peter  bvenchley  steven  speilberg  films  1975 
Added: 28th September 2007
Views: 2149
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Posted By: Sophia
WW II Hero Tony Stein Tony Stein was born in Dayton, Ohio. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on 22 Sep 1942. At Iwo Jima, manned with a light machine gun that he had previously taken from an aircraft, he fired while standing upright amidst heavy enemy fire to provide his fellow Marines time to get into position. He then charged nearby Japanese pillboxes alone, killing about 20 Japanese soldiers in close range. He ran out of ammunition eight times; each time, he ran back to the beach with a wounded Marine on his shoulders, resupplied himself, and ran right back into combat. On 1 Mar 1945, he was killed in action. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor and now rests in peace at Calvary Cemetery in Dayton, Ohio.
Tags: WW  II  Hero  Tony  Stein 
Added: 24th March 2009
Views: 1885
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Posted By: Old Fart
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 1144
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Posted By: Lava1964
James Cagney Grapefruit Scene A famous scene from an old classic: James Cagney cruelly shoves a grapefruit into the face of actress Mae Clarke in The Public Enemy (1931). Depending on which story you believe, Cagney either ad-libbed the incident or he and Clarke together decided to incorporate it into the scene. Either way, no one else in the studio expected it!
Tags: James  Cagney  grapefruit  Public  Enemy 
Added: 10th December 2007
Views: 3716
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Posted By: Lava1964
Father of John Dillinger Speaks Out The father of 'public enemy number one,' John Dillinger, apologizes for his son's criminal behavior in this 1933 interview. The elder Dillinger is certain his wayward boy would 'go straight' if given the chance. Uh huh.
Tags: John  Dillinger 
Added: 24th December 2007
Views: 1272
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Public Enemy Get Me Classic James Cagney
Tags: Gooden! 
Added: 13th June 2008
Views: 947
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Posted By: Marty6697
Victoria Cross Winner Joseph Kaeble The Victoria Cross is the most difficult military medal in the world to attain. To be considered for a VC, one has to be a member of a British Commonwealth country's armed forces and perform an exceptionally brave feat in the face of the enemy. Some of the heroics of Canada's 94 VC winners almost defy belief. Consider how 26-year-old Corporal Joseph Kaeble won his VC.
Tags: Joseph  Kaebel  Victoria  Cross 
Added: 12th November 2008
Views: 1217
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Posted By: Lava1964

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