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The Sound Of The Dot Matrix Printer Tags: The  Sound  Of  The  Dot  Matrix  Printer  computer  computing   
Added: 18th September 2014
Views: 576
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Posted By: Cathy
Ernie Banks Anecdote Beloved Chicago Cubs great Ernie Banks passed away at the age of 83 on January 23, 2015. In this short clip from the early 1980s, former Cubs' broadcaster Jack Brickhouse relates an anecdote that illustrates why Banks was such a popular player with the fans.
Tags: baseball  Ernie  Banks  Jack  Brickhouse 
Added: 24th January 2015
Views: 445
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bomb Destroys CA Flight 11 - 1962 On Tuesday, May 22, 1962 a deadly act of madness caused Continental Airlines Flight #11 to be blown out of the sky. Eight crew members and 37 passengers perished. To date it is the worst airline disaster ever to occur in the skies over Missouri. The doomed flight departed Chicago's O'Hare Airport at 8:35 p.m. for Kansas City, MO. At the last second, Thomas G. Doty arrived at the departure gate. Although the airplane doors had been closed--and airline policy prohibits doors from being reopened--the doors were improperly reopened and Doty was permitted to board the aircraft. The flight was absolutely routine until the plane approached the Mississippi River. At that point the pilot informed air traffic control that he was deviating from the planned course to avoid severe thunderstorms in the area. In the vicinity of Centerville, IA, the radar image of the aircraft suddenly disappeared from the scope of Flight Following Service in Waverly, IA. It had nothing to do with inclement weather. At approximately 9:17 p.m. an explosion occurred in the right rear lavatory resulting in separation of the airplane's tail section from the fuselage. The remaining aircraft structure pitched nose-down violently, causing the engines to tear off, after which it fell into uncontrollable gyrations. The fuselage of the Boeing 707, minus the aft 38 feet, and with part of the left and most of the right wing intact, struck an alfalfa field on the ground. Most of the fuselage was found near Unionville, MO, but the engines and parts of the tail section and left wing were found up to six miles away from the main wreckage area. Of the 45 individuals on board, 44 were already dead when rescuers reached the crash site. One passenger, 27-year-old Takehiko Nakano of Evanston, IL, was barely alive when rescuers found him among the wreckage, but he later succumbed to fatal internal injuries. Another victim, Fred P. Herman, was a recipient of the United States Medal of Freedom. In their investigation of the crash, FBI agents discovered that late-arriving passenger Thomas G. Doty, a married man with a five-year-old daughter, had purchased a life insurance policy from Mutual of Omaha for $150,000, the maximum available. He further augmented that coverage with a flight insurance policy worth another $150,000 that he purchased just before departure. Doty had recently been arrested for armed robbery and was to soon face a preliminary hearing in the matter. Investigators determined that Doty had purchased six sticks of dynamite--at 29 cents apiece--shortly before the flight. An examination of the wreckage determined that Doty's dynamite bomb was detonated in the lavatory. His motive was purely financial: His wife and daughter would be able to collect $300,000 of life insurance. His widow attempted to collect on the insurance, but when Doty's death was ruled a suicide, the policies were voided.
Tags: crime  bomb  air  disaster  Flight  11 
Added: 15th December 2015
Views: 517
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Posted By: Lava1964
Party Lines Millennials will have trouble believing these ever existed, but at one time the majority of North American households did not have private telephone lines. Instead, they were serviced by party lines--basically one common telephone line that served numerous households. Party lines existed in urban areas where private lines were unavailable or expensive, but they are more frequently associated with rural areas where great distances separated neighbors and made private lines expensive for phone companies to install. As late as 1943, three-quarters of Pennsylvania's telephone customers had party lines. Party lines had certain advantages: Important community news could be relayed quickly to everyone who was connected, but of course there were major negatives too. Privacy was a virtual impossibility as anyone else who subscribed to the party line could eavesdrop on others' conversations. Also, there was the obvious problem of one subscriber hogging the line, preventing others from making a call. (If you look at Ann Landers-type newspaper columns from the first half of the 20th century, one person dominating the party line was a frequent complaint.) Phone companies responded by offering protocol tips to party-line users. Among the typical suggestions was a five-minute limit per call. Eavesdropping on others' phone conversations did lead to some amusing anecdotes. Criminal schemes were known to have been thwarted by listeners who heard crooks discussing their plans. One college football coach overheard his rival's plans on how to defeat his team in an upcoming game. Most telephone companies discontinued party lines toward the end of the 1970s.
Tags: party  lines  telephone  systems 
Added: 7th November 2016
Views: 512
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rarest Canadian Coin - 1936 Dot Cent The rarest and most desirable coin in Canadian history is the "1936 dot" one-cent coin. Only three are known to exist. Why were they struck? On January 20, 1936, King George V died shortly after his 71st birthday. As is customary with Canadian coinage, if a monarch dies anytime during a year, his/her portrait remains on all the coins minted in that year. George V was succeeded on the throne by his eldest son, Edward VIII. Anyone with even passing knowledge of the history of the British royal family ought to know that Edward VIII abdicated late in 1936 in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. He was succeeded by his younger brother, who became George VI. This presented a problem for the Royal Canadian Mint. It had already prepared dies for its 1937 coins with the likeness of Edward VIII, which were now outdated and useless. It was feared that the new dies with George VI's head would not be ready for striking in 1937. The mint conceived a backup plan: They would reissue the 1936 coins bearing George V's likeness, but place a dot below the 1936 date to indicate they were made during the 1937 mintage year. Only three samples of the one-cent coin bearing the distinctive dot were struck--and all three were kept by the director of the mint. As it turned out, the dies for 1937 with George VI's head were ready in time for 1937 strikes, so the 1936 dot coins were not needed. One of the three rare coins sold at auction in 2013 for about $250,000 U.S.
Tags: 1936  dot  Canadian  cent  rare  numismatics 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 18
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Posted By: Lava1964

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