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Ivan Dixon of Hogans Heroes Fame dies at 76 Actor Ivan Dixon, who brought the problems and promise of contemporary blacks to life in the film "Nothing But a Man" and portrayed the levelheaded POW Kinchloe in TV's "Hogan's Heroes," has died. He was 76. Dixon died Sunday at Presbyterian Hospital in Charlotte after a hemorrhage, said his daughter, Doris Nomathande Dixon of Charlotte. He had suffered complications from kidney failure, she said. Dixon, who also directed scores of television shows, began his acting career in the late 1950s. He appeared on Broadway in William Saroyan's 1957 "The Cave Dwellers" and in playwright Lorraine Hansberry's groundbreaking 1959 drama of black life, "A Raisin in the Sun." In the latter, he played a Nigerian student visiting the United States, a role he repeated in the film version. While not a hit, the 1964 "Nothing But a Man," in which Dixon co-starred with Abbey Lincoln, also drew praise as a rare, early effort to bring the lives of black Americans to the big screen.
Tags: ivan  dixon  hogans  heroes  american  black  actors 
Added: 19th March 2008
Views: 1560
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Posted By: Naomi
Room 222 Promo remember this show? . . . the series focused on an American History class at Walt Whitman High School in Los Angeles, though it also covered other events at the school. The class, Room 222, was taught by Pete Dixon (Lloyd Haynes), an idealistic African-American teacher. Other characters featured in the show were guidance counselor Liz McIntyre (Denise Nicholas), who was also Pete's girlfriend; the principal, Seymour Kaufman (Michael Constantine) and fidgety, somewhat "wacky" Alice Johnson (Karen Valentine) as a student teacher. . . Cliffy posted a clip of this in color, but i like this one too, in black and white and with Dudley Doright!!
Tags:   dudley    do    right    snidley    whiplash    room  222      karen  valentine      1969 
Added: 16th July 2008
Views: 1772
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Posted By: Teresa
United States Football League Sports history has shown that it is very difficult for nascent pro sports leagues to challenge old, established ones. Nevertheless, there are entrepreneurs always willing to try. From 1983 through 1985 the United States Football League existed as a spring/summer league. The USFL was the brainchild of David Dixon, a New Orleans antique dealer. In 1980, Dixon commissioned a study by Frank Magid Associates that found promising results for a spring and summer football league. He'd also formed a blueprint for the prospective league's operations, which included early television exposure, heavy promotion in home markets, and owners willing to absorb years of losses—-which he felt would be inevitable until the league found its feet. The USFL secured television contracts from both ABC and ESPN. The league also was able to sign several collegiate stars--most notably Herschel Walker who was still an underclassman. Mostly, however, the public responded with yawns. Television ratings and overall attendance were below expectations. Teams often spent far more than the proposed $1.8 million salary cap to land big-name players. In three seasons, 23 different teams played under the USFL banner. The Breakers were a typical USFL franchise, operating in three different cities (Boston, New Orleans, and Portland) over the three years. Teams typically wallowed in debt. The San Antonio Gunslingers were in such dire straits that some players, whose pay checks had bounced, were exchanging their complimentary game tickets for food and were boarding at the homes of sympathetic fans. The USFL was dealt its death blow in a courtroom in 1986 when it won an antitrust lawsuit versus the National Football League--but the jury awarded the USFL only $3 in damages. Still, some USFL innovations were evenutally adopted by the NFL. These included the two-point conversion, the use of instant replay to assist officials, and a salary cap.
Tags: USFL  football 
Added: 21st November 2009
Views: 1313
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kenneth Washington Kenneth Washington is another Hogan's Heroes cast member who is still alive. Washington, now 65, played Corporal Richard Baker in the final season of Hogan's Heroes (1970-71). He effectively replaced Ivan Dixon (Sergeant James Kinchloe) who had left the cast after the show's fifth season. Baker assumed Kinchloe's role as the heroes' radio operator. During the show, no explanation was ever offered as to what happened to Kinchloe or how Baker became part of the heroes. That's kind of odd when Stalag 13 was supposedly an escape-proof POW camp! Perhaps CBS hoped nobody would notice the change!
Tags: Kenneth  Washington  Hogans  Heroes 
Added: 5th June 2012
Views: 2933
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Posted By: Lava1964
110m Hurdles Final - 1948 Olympics Here's an astonishingly sharp color clip of American Bill Porter winning the gold medal in the 110-meter hurdles final of the 1948 London Olympics. Americans Clyde Scott and Craig Dixon finished second and third respectively.
Tags: 1948  Olympics  Bill  Porter  hurdles  final 
Added: 24th March 2013
Views: 1603
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Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Sgt Kinchloe Ivan Dixon played prisoner of war Sgt. James Kinchloe on the CBS sitcom Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1970. By rank, Sgt. Kinchloe (nicknamed "Kinch") was third in command of the prisoners who stealthily engaged in sabotage and espionage capers to thwart the German war machine. Sgt. Kinchloe was a "communicatins specialist" whose typical job was to send and decode radio messages. After five seasons, Dixon grew tired of the role and sought more challenging TV and movie assignments, including directing. He once complained to the producers of Hogan's Heroes that only a few of the episodes centered around Kinch and that his most common line was "Message from London, Colonel." He left the show after season five concluded in 1970. For the final season, a new black prisoner, Cpl. Richard Baker (played by Kenneth Washington), replaced Kinch and took over his position as the Heroes' communications specialist. Kinch's absence from the cast was never explained. Based on the show's premise and ongoing plot, Sgt. Kinchloe's total disappearance is hard to accept. The prisoners made certain that Stalag 13 was supposedly "escape-proof" to ensure that the easily manipulated Colonel Klink would appear efficient and remain as the camp's commander. Thus one would think that Kinchloe did not escape. So what the heck happened to him?
Tags: Kinchloe  Hogans  Heroes  Ivan  DIxon 
Added: 5th November 2014
Views: 2069
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Posted By: Lava1964
 Funeral for Confederate Submariners On February 17, 1864, the small navy of the Confederate States of America could claim a military first: A submarine sank an enemy ship. The crew of the H.L. Hunley, under the command of George Dixon, achieved the feat of sinking the USS Housatonic in Charleston Harbor, only to mysteriously sink later that same day with the loss of its entire crew of eight sailors. The H.L. Hunley had a short, checkered history. Twice it sank during training operations, killing a total of 13 men--including its namesake inventor who was aboard for the second catastrophe. Both times the hull was raised, repaired and put back into service. The hull of the Hunley was first located in 1995 and was raised in 2000. The remains of the brave sailors were finally laid to rest on April 17, 2004. Thousands of curious but respectful onlookers, dressed in both blue and gray, turned out for the ceremony at Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, SC. Scientists and military historians are still trying to discover exactly why the submarine sank.
Tags: Confederate  submariners  funeral 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 1037
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Posted By: Lava1964

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