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Final Scene from The Big Parade - 1925 One of film history's largely forgotten masterpieces is The Big Parade (1925). Directed by King Vidor, the movie stars John Gilbert as James (Jim) Apperson, the pampered son of an American industrialist who, while watching a military procession, is persuaded by his patriotic friends to enlist in the US Army to fight in the First World War. The main female character, Melisande, a French farm girl, is played by Renee Adoree. The plot has Jim's unit being billeted on the grounds of Melisande's farm and the two falling in love--despite the language barrier and Jim being engaged to a girl back home named Justyn. The two lovers are separated as Jim's unit is called to the front. Jim is wounded in the leg. While recuperating in a hospital, Jim learns that Melisande's farm has changed hands several times and that Melisande and her mother are among hundreds of refugees who have fled their homes. Just before Jim returns stateside as an amputee, his mother discovers that Justyn has fallen in love with Jim's brother. Accordingly, Jim's mother urges him to return to France to look for Melisande. Here is the climactic scene when Jimmy and Melisande reunite.
Tags: The  Big  Parade  John  Gilbert  Renee  Adoree  1925  final  scene  silent  film 
Added: 12th June 2017
Views: 682
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Thom McKee - Tic Tac Dough Champ Navy officer Lt. Thom McKee became a game show superstar in 1980 when he won the staggering sum of $312,700 in cash and prizes as a contestant on Tic Tac Dough, a syndicated quiz show. McKee, age 25, appeared in 46 episodes and played 89 games. He defeated 43 opponents and tied 45 games before losing to Erik Kraepeller. In total, McKee answered 353 questions correctly. During his remarkable undefeated/winning streak, his progress was often reported by mainstream news outlets--which was basically unheard of in 1980. McKee's list of prizes included eight cars (as winners on Tic Tac Dough were awarded a new car for every fifth win), three sailboats, 16 vacations (which he was unable to take), numerous other smaller prizes, and $200,000 in cash. McKee's win was especially noteworthy because most American game shows at the time had either limits on prizes or appearances. McKee discovered the fame is fleeting, however. Shortly after his run on Tic Tac Dough ended, McKee appeared on the short-lived reincarnation of To Tell The Truth. Only one of the three panelists was able to identify him as the real Thom McKee. McKee's record-setting winnings were not surpassed until the initial run of Who Wants to be a Millionaire ushered in the era of enormous game show prizes in 1999.
Tags: Thom  McKee  game  show  winner  Tic  Tac  Dough 
Added: 12th January 2018
Views: 1294
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 945
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dicovery - Sunday Morning Kids Show From October 1962 to September 1971, ABC aired a "highbrow series for children" called Discovery. Historical and cultural themes were emphasized in each program. In its first season it began as a 25-minute weekday series, but failed to attract much of an audience. In 1963 it switched to a Sunday morning timeslot where it remained for the duration of its run. Hosted by Virginia Gibson (later Bill Owen joined Gibson as a co-host), the show is fondly remembered by children of that era because it was, for years, the only network show that aired on Sunday mornings that was not an adult-oriented political or news panel show. Each year that Discovery aired it was followed by the last two digits of the year. He is the opening and closing of a Discovery '68 episode.
Tags: Discovery  children  TV  programming 
Added: 11th March 2019
Views: 490
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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