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Springhill Mining Disaster 1958 One of the first major 'ongoing' news stories to be covered live on television was the coal mining disaster in Springhill, Nova Scotia, Canada on October 23, 1958. That night 174 miners were trapped 13,000 feet below ground when a 'bump' caused a huge section of the mine to collapse. It was the third major disaster at the mine since 1891. Exactly 100 miners were rescued; some were trapped for five days before being saved. The bodies of the other 74 were all eventually recovered. Because of the heat at that depth, many of the corpses had badly decomposed by the time they were found. The mine never reopened.
Tags: Springhill  mine  disaster 
Added: 13th June 2009
Views: 3293
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eat More Cottage Cheese 1918 poster from the U.S. Department of Agriculture making the case for more cottage cheese in our diets. . .humm, informative. . . but not very appetising!
Tags: ad  cottage  cheese  dept  of  agriculture 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 2093
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Posted By: Sissy
Walt Disney  The Old Mill This is the '50s re-issue print of the Oscar-winning 1937 Silly Symphony, 'The Old Mill'. The original opening title featured a 'Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.' credit. No matter though, the power and depth of the 'Multiplane' camera, demonstrated here, is still impressive, 70 years later.
Tags: Silly  Symphony  Classic  Walt  Disney  Cartoons  The  Old  Mill 
Added: 16th December 2007
Views: 2060
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Posted By: Sophia
Baseball Hitting Famine 1968 This 1968 issue of Sports Illustrated discussed the 'hitting famine' in Major League Baseball. The offensive dearth reached its depths during the 1968 season, which baseball historians rightfully call 'the year of the pitcher.' That season Don Drysdale set a new record for consecutive shutout innings pitched. Bob Gibson's ERA was a ridiculous 1.12. Carl Yastrzemski won the American League batting title with a mere .301 average. The decline in offense can be traced back to 1962 when MLB allowed teams to raise the pitching mound beyond its rulebook height of 15 inches, if they so desired. (It was done as a knee-jerk reponse to the the big home run season of 1961.) However, the new height of the mound gave the pitchers a huge edge. The mound at Dodger Stadium was reputedly 20 inches high in the heyday of Sandy Koufax and Drysdale. The decline in offense adversely affected attendance. The hitting famine era ended when the pitcher's mound was reduced to its modern height of ten inches in 1969.
Tags: baseball  hitting  famine 
Added: 7th December 2009
Views: 1341
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Posted By: Lava1964
1963 Teens In The News What? Look at that skinny kid named Steve Spielberg. If only he had tried a little harder he could have made something of himself. LOL And we all know that 16-year-old pianist Andre Watts made musical history right out the gate! Amazingly, 14-year-old Francine Fox earned an Olympic silver medal one year later in Women's Kayak Doubles! At the 1964 Olympic Summer games in Tokyo, Francine Fox and Gloria Perrier paddled to a silver medal, trailing a German pair by two seconds. The pairing was interesting for the disparity in ages, as, in 1964, Fox was a 15-year-old high school student, while Perrier was 20 years older. I couldn't find the other teen in the news singer Nancy Hawk in Google, but these vintage Seventeen magazines have lots of fun surprises to offer!
Tags: 1963  SeventeenMagazine  SteveSpielberg  film  movies  Hollywood  AndreWatts  music  FrancineFox  sports  Olympics  teenagers  NancyHawk  MilitaryDefenseDept 
Added: 13th July 2011
Views: 2158
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Aberfan Disaster - 1966 At 9.15 am on Friday, October 21, 1966 a enormous mountain of excavated coal mining debris (known to coal miners as a waste tip) slid down a mountainside into the mining village of Aberfan, near Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. The waste tips, which had been building up for 50 years, had become heavy and saturated due to a week of rainy weather. The debris slide first destroyed a farm cottage in its path, killing all the occupants. At Pantglas Junior School, just below, the children had just returned to their classes after singing All Things Bright and Beautiful at their assembly. The tipping gang up the mountain had seen the slide start, but could not raise the alarm because their telephone cable had been repeatedly stolen. (The Tribunal of Inquiry later established that the disaster happened so quickly that a telephone warning would not have saved any lives regardless.) Down in the village, nobody saw anything, but everybody heard the noise as about 40,000 cubic metres of debris crashed into the school at a depth of 39 feet. Gaynor Minett, an eight-year-old student, remembered four years later, "It was a tremendous rumbling sound and all the school went dead. You could hear a pin drop. Everyone just froze in their seats. I just managed to get up and I reached the end of my desk when the sound got louder and nearer, until I could see the black out of the window. I can't remember any more but I woke up to find that a horrible nightmare had just begun in front of my eyes." The slide engulfed the school and about 20 houses in the village before coming to rest. Then there was total silence. George Williams, who was trapped in the wreckage, remembered that "In that silence you couldn't hear a bird or a child." All able-bodied persons in the village rushed to the scene with whatever implements they could find to begin digging through the mess to search for survivors. None were found after 11 a.m., but it took nearly a week to recover all the bodies. The death toll in the Aberfan disaster was 144--of which 116 were school children. That accounted for about half the school's enrolment. Five teachers were killed too. An inquiry later blamed the National Coal Board (NCB) for ignoring warnings from years earlier about the potential hazards of the growing waste tips. Families of the victims were eventually compensated 500 British pounds by the NCB for each loved one who had perished.
Tags: Aberfan  Wales  disaster  coal 
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 2528
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Posted By: Lava1964
Buddy Holly True Love Ways Recorded in 1958, but not released until 1960 after Buddy had left us for a better gig. Though co-credited with Norman Petty, I think this beautiful song clearly demonstrates Buddy's emotional depth. Sure, he made some of the greatest rock 'n' roll songs the radio ever heard, but there was so much more to him than that. I've often thought about what Buddy would have done if he had lived. Would he have gravitated to the country music scene like Jerry Lee,Carl Perkins and Conway Twitty? Maybe, but I think Buddy had a lot more going for him than the rest of the pack. I'm just grateful he left us so much in such a short space of time to remember him by.
Tags: Buddy  Holly  True  Love  Ways 
Added: 20th February 2013
Views: 3068
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Posted By: kinkman
Patterson-Rademacher fight 1957 The 1950s are often described as the golden age of boxing--when depth and talent were supposedly at their finest in the sweet science. People tend to forget that the heavyweight division was rather weak for much of the decade. Contenders for the world heavyweight title were so scarce that Pete Rademacher, the 1956 Olympic gold medalist, got a coveted shot at world heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson's title in his pro debut! Having won the heavyweight laurels in Melbourne in 1956 by scoring three knockouts in his only three bouts, Rademacher, a Washingtonian, somehow persuaded the powers that be that it would be a great idea if he could fight Patterson in Seattle' Sick Stadium in a unique amateur-versus-pro matchup. Patterson agreed if the promoters could guarantee him $250,000. They did--so the fight was set for August 22, 1957. Surprisingly, Rademacher did well in the first two rounds, pressing the action and even scoring a knockdown with a hard right hand. By the fourth round, however, Patterson's class began to show. He scored one of what would be seven knockdowns of the game challenger. Eventually Rademacher was knocked out in the fifth round. The promotion barely generated financial enough interest to meet Patterson's guaranteed payday. Depending on which source you believe, Rademacher got either absolutely nothing or a laughable $1.75 for his losing effort. Undaunted, Rademacher fought hard-hitting Zora Folley in his next bout--and was knocked out again. Rademacher ended his pro boxing career with a 15-7-1 record. All seven of his defeats came at the hands of world-class fighters. As of August 2015, Pete was still alive and kicking at age 86.
Tags: Pete  Rademacher  boxing  amateur  Floyd  Patterson 
Added: 17th August 2015
Views: 1041
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Posted By: Lava1964

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