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Van Cliburn - Moscow 1958 A truly historic classical music performance: In 1958, at the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union hosted an international Tchaikovsky compeition for pianists. It was supposed to showcase the superiority of Soviet culture. To the surprise of the hosts, a 23-year-old Texan named Van Cliburn emerged as the superstar of the event. Cliburn mesmerized the crowds, the television audience, and the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra with his technical and artistic brilliance. Here is the last four minutes of Cliburn's final performance of the event--Rachmaninoff's 3rd Concerto. Look at the reaction from the audience and the orchestra members. The applause lasted for about eight minutes. Everyone knew who the outstanding pianist of the competition was! This created quite a dilemma for the organizers: a Soviet citizen was expected to win--not an American. Soviet Premier Nikita Khruschev was hastily telephoned to make the final decision. To his credit Khruschev settled the matter quickly and fairly: "Was he the best? Yes? Then give him the prize!" Cliburn became a beloved figure in Russia until his death in 2013.
Tags: Van  Cliburn  pianist  1958  Tchaikovsky  competition  Moscow 
Added: 21st January 2014
Views: 2624
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Posted By: Lava1964
1920 Houdini Poster In the 1920s, after many years entertaining crowds as an escape artist, Houdini changed his show to expose the methods and motivations of the Spiritualists, a group who claimed they could contact the dead through sťances. Testifying against them in Congress, he also exposed their tricks while on stage, an act he turned into a Broadway show. Soon, Houdini received death threats from the group.
Tags: 1920  houdini  poster   
Added: 25th July 2007
Views: 7631
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Posted By: Teresa
Featured Member- jedwgrn aka Jack My name is Jack and this trek of mine began in Dallas in '49. Raised in Irving, TX, I am one of seven kids which made for a crowd in a small house and you had to not be the last to the table during chow time. Now, I am the father of four and the grandfather of nine and I am proud of everyone of them. Just ask me, I have pictures. My family was and is the primary focus for most of my life and kids in sports and other activities claimed most of my free time. These are the days I thought I would have more time for myself, not so. I seem to be busier now than ever. April marks my 40th anniversary with the US Army in one capacity or another. Talk about being a lifer. In April of '69 I was drafted into the Army in Dallas, spent two years in (infantry and Vietnam) and then got out. The next two years I went to school while a reserve member and then returned to active duty in 1973. My military retirement was effective July of 1992. I retired as a Master Sergeant after serving as a First Sergeant for seven years. Immediately thereafter I returned to service in a civilian capacity, which is where I remain. Today it still is all about soldiers. I work and teach in a dental prosthetics laboratory for an Army residency program that has Army and Navy dentists to include two Canadian officers as residents. I have a job that I really like what I do. So, as I have always asked myself, 'Where to from here?' Haven't got a clue - perhaps this is the last stop, God willing.
Tags: Featured  Member-  jedwgrn  aka  Jack  Nice  Guy 
Added: 9th March 2009
Views: 2188
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Posted By: Steve
Miss Jane Powell here at age 17 (her studio says 16), had her first pin-up photo shot taken. This was taken right after she was in HOLIDAY IN MEXICO in 1946. (PLOT "Ambassador Jeffrey Evans (Walter Pidgeon), a widower living in Mexico, has his hands full with his teenage daughter Christine (Jane Powell). Christine runs the entire household and tries to manage her father's private life as well. But love threatens to wreck all her carefully made plans: an earnest young classmate (Roddy McDowall) is hopelessly in love with her. . .Ambassador Evans is smitten with a beautiful singer (Ilona Massey). . .and poor Christine isn't sure where she fits in anymore! Top top it all off, Christine develops a crush on famed pianist Jose Iturbi, who is much older than she." TRIVIA: One of several films in which a young Fidel Castro appears as an extra, mostly in crowd scenes.
Tags: Jane  Powell    Holiday  In  Mexico  Walter  Pidgeon    Roddy  McDoDowall    Ilona  Massey  Fidel  Castro 
Added: 2nd October 2007
Views: 2181
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Posted By: Teresa
Memories of Danny Kaye Danny was born David Daniel Kaminsky in Brooklyn in 1913, the son of an immigrant Russian tailor. After dropping out of high school he worked for a radio station and later as a comedian in the Catskills. After his solo success in the Catskills, he joined the dancing act of Harvey and Young in 1933. On opening night he lost his balance and the audience broke into a roar of laughter. He would later incorporate this into his act. Enjoying growing popularity in 1939, Danny won over the Broadway crowd that same year with his show-stopping comic singing in "Lady in the Dark," in which he rattled off the names of more than fifty polysyllabic Russian composers in 39 seconds in a song called "Tchaikovsky." Throughout the early 1940's he performed night club acts, on Broadway, and to support the troops overseas during WWII. Though he appeared in his first film in 1937, it wasnít until almost 10 years later that his film career hit its stride. Throughout his career he starred in seventeen movies, including THE KID FROM BROADWAY (1946), THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (1947), THE INSPECTOR GENERAL (1949), HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN (1952), and the incomparable THE COURT JESTER (1956). In one of his final performances, he proved the versatility of his talent and earned rave reviews for his impassioned portrayal of a Holocaust survivor in the 1981 television movie SKOKIE. In 1987 Danny died of a heart attack in Los Angeles. An amazing actor, singer, dancer, comic, and all-around entertainer, he was a Renaissance man off the stage as well as on, where he was a celebrated chef, a baseball team owner, and an airplane pilot, flying everything from Piper Cubs to Boeing 747ís. His deep and continued commitment to the betterment of the people of the world was an inspiration, and his intelligent humor created a style all his own that made him one of the most beloved entertainers of his time. In a clip from the 1952 film "Hans Christian Andersen", Danny shows off his incredible style with "Inchworm.
Tags: danny  kaye  actors  singers  comedians 
Added: 7th November 2007
Views: 2386
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Posted By: Sophia
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 1654
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Posted By: Lava1964
Beaver Lamb and Wombat coats The animal rights crowd won't like this 1929 ad. A wombat coat? Sounds weird, but what a deal! You save $14.
Tags: wombat  lamb  beaver  coats 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 3085
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dobie Gray   Out On The Floor This is probably the single biggest and most acclaimed Northern Soul record of all time. This performance was filmed for 'The Strange World Of Northern Soul' in Nashville, in early 1999. Dobie is otherwise best known for his 1965 'The In Crowd' and 1973's 'Drift Away.' He was a versatile vocalist who could handle soul, country, and pop. 'Out On The Floor' remains his most beloved soul anthem.
Tags: dobie  grey  out  on  the  floor  drift  away  the  in  crowd  northern  soul 
Added: 18th December 2007
Views: 1609
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Posted By: Babs64
Suzanne Lenglen France's Suzanne Lenglen was pretty much invincible in women's tennis in the 1920s, losing only one match of significance in singles from 1914 through 1926. She ruled the sport when the major tournaments were amatuer events only. This photo of Lenglen was taken at the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium. Considered a sex symbol in her heyday, Lenglen turned professional after 1926 and played a series of exhibition matches in the United States that didn't draw very good crowds because Lenglen so outclassed her competition. She died of leukemia in 1938 when she was only 39 years old.
Tags: Suzanne  Lenglen  tennis 
Added: 20th February 2008
Views: 1212
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hagler Vs Minter 1980 England's Alan Minter defends his world middleweight title against Marvin Hagler in Wembley Arena in London on September 27, 1980. As you will see, the fight is stopped in the third round due to cuts, and the pro-Minter crowd reacts angrily.
Tags: Alan  Minter  Marvin  Hagler  boxing 
Added: 25th February 2008
Views: 1260
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Posted By: Lava1964

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