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Alfred Mosher Butts Inventor of Scrabble One of my heroes! In 1948 Alfred Mosher Butts, an unemployed architect, invented the greatest word game in the history of the world: Scrabble Brand Crossword Game. He named it Criss-Cross Words and didn't make much money from it. He sold the rights to a family called the Brunots who renamed the game Scrabble and marketed it from their home. It got plenty of rave reviews in the early 1950s. Demand for Scrabble became so great that the Brunots could not keep pace with the orders. They in turn sold the rights to Scrabble to a manufacturer. Over the years Scrabble's ownership has passed through several companies. Hasbro presently owns the North American trademark name of Scrabble. Each year millions of games are sold and hundreds of tournaments are held under the aegis of the National Scrabble Association. (Yours truly is an expert ranked player who directs an official NSA club in Canada. I can often be spotted officiating major Scrabble events. Look for me at the 2008 U.S. Nationals in Orlando in July!)
Tags: Scrabble  Alfred  Butts 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2259
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1951 Life Savers Ad If you were a Life Savers-eating crossword puzzle fan in 1951, this ad would have appealed to you. (Hey, a roll still only costs a nickel!)
Tags: Life  Savers  Ad 
Added: 26th March 2008
Views: 1169
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Worlds First Crossword Puzzle Here’s the very first crossword puzzle, designed by Arthur Wynne. It appeared in the New York World on December 21, 1913. 2-3. 4-5. 6-7. 10-11. 14-15. 18-19. 22-23. 26-27. 28-29. 30-31. 8-9. 12-13. 16-17. 20-21. 24-25. 10-18. What bargain hunters enjoy. A written acknowledgment. Such and nothing more. A bird. Opposed to less. What this puzzle is. An animal of prey. The close of a day. To elude. The plural of is. To cultivate. A bar of wood or iron. What artists learn to do. Fastened. Found on the seashore. The fiber of the gomuti palm. 6-22. 4-26. 2-11. 19-28. F-7. 23.30. 1-32. 33-34. N-8. 24-31. 3-12. 20-29. 5-27. 9- 25. 13-21. What we all should be. A day dream. A talon. A pigeon. Part of your head. A river in Russia. To govern. An aromatic plant. A fist. To agree with. Part of a ship. One. Exchanging. To sink in mud. A boy.
Tags: crossword  puzzle      1913      Arthur  Wynne 
Added: 3rd April 2008
Views: 1299
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
First Crossword Puzzle 1913 Arthur Wynne started a sensation on December 21, 1913. His creation, the first-ever crossword puzzle, appeared as a 'mental exercise' in the Fun section of the New York World. The numbering system is a little different than what you'd see in today's puzzles. Clues listed both starting and ending numbers. Within a decade, crossword puzzles were a newspaper staple throughout most of the English-speaking world. I'll post the clues for this historic puzzle if anyone requests them.
Tags: crossword  puzzle 
Added: 5th October 2009
Views: 3405
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
D-Day Crossword Puzzle Security Breach In the spring of 1944 the Allies were poised to land in German-occupied France. The only uncertainty was where and when. Tight security over the enormous operation was paramount. (One American general was demoted and sent back to the Unites States for merely speculating on an invasion date at a social gathering.) Accordingly, British Intelligence was aghast when several key code names linked to the D-Day invasion began appearing as answers in the Daily Telegraph crossword puzzles in the month before the June 6 invasion. The code names of all five beaches (Gold, Sword, Juno, Omaha, Utah), the portable harbors (Mulberry), the naval support (Neptune), and the entire operation (Overlord) appeared! Agents questioned Leonard Dawe, a 54-year-old local schoolmaster, who had submitted the puzzles. Dawe didn't know what the fuss was about. He told the agents the words simply fit the puzzles. For years the incident was regarded as a remarkable coincidence. However, in 1984, one of Dawe's former students at the Strand School shed more light on the subject. Ronald French, who was 14 in 1944, said Dawe routinely had his students fill in crossword grids as a mental exercise. Dawe kept the especially good grids, wrote accompanying clues, and submitted them to the Daily Telegraph. The boys often socialized with the Allied troops stationed nearby and likely acquired the words by overhearing their conversations. There is no evidence that Dawe was a German agent, nor is there any evidence that the Germans benefitted from this odd security breach.
Tags: crossword  puzzle  D-Day  WWII  security 
Added: 25th November 2009
Views: 4075
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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