Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Incomplete 1919 Stanley Cup Final The NHL has not always had sole possession of the Stanley Cup as its championship trophy. It was originally donated by Lord Stanley of Preston, Canada's fifth governor-general, to be awarded to the championship amateur hockey team of Canada. By 1910, the rules were liberalized and professional teams were competing for it. Beginning in the 1910s, the professional champions of the west annually met the champions of the eastern-based National Hockey Association (and later the National Hockey League) for the Cup with the venue alternating between east and west each year. In 1919, the Seattle Metropolitan were pitted against the Montreal Canadiens in a best-of-five contest in Seattle. After five games, the series was tied with each team having won twice and one game ending in a tie. A sixth game was necessary to decide the Cup winner, but by the end of the fifth game, both teams were feeling the effects of illness as the Spanish Influenza pandemic hit Seattle. The Canadiens were especially hard hit by the flu bug. Several players were hospitalized. One, defenseman Joe Hall, died. The series was abandoned and never resumed. Thus there was no Stanley Cup winner in 1919.
Tags: hockey  Stanley  Cup  final  cancelled  1919  flu  epidemic 
Added: 11th November 2017
Views: 55
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Scofflaw - Prize-Winning Prohibition Word During America's Prohibition years, violations of the Volstead Act (which outlawed the sale, transportation, and manufacture of alcoholic beverages) were widespread. In 1924, an ardent Massachusetts prohibitionist named Delcevare King offered a $200 prize to anyone who could create a new word that would heap shame the lawless drinkers and those who enabled them. Two entrants--both from Massachusetts--named Henry Dale and Kate Butler each came up with the same winning word: scofflaw. It was clever a combination of the verb scoff (meaning to mock, deride or ridicule) and, of course, law. Dale and Butler split the $200 prize. The word did catch on and, over the years, scofflaw has expanded its meaning to encompass those who willfully break any law--not just liquor statutes.
Tags: Prohibition  scofflaw  contest  lexicography 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 24
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 10 11 12 13 14 15 [16] of 16 | Random