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Queen For A Day Total Television calls Queen For A Day, '...possibly the most maudlin game show ever broadcast'--and for good reason. Considered a forerunner of modern-day reality TV, QFAD was a successful radio program beginning in 1945 before airing on daytime television from 1956 through 1964. At the peak of the show's popularity in the late 1950s, NBC expanded it from 30 to 45 minutes to sell more commercials, at a then-premium rate of $4,000 per minute. QFAD opened with host Jack Bailey asking the largely female studio audience, 'Would YOU like to be queen for a day?' After this, the contestants were introduced and interviewed. Each contestant talked about recent financial and emotional hard times she had been through. The sob stories were rated on an applause meter. Bailey began each interview gently, asking the contestant first about her life and family, and maintaining a positive and upbeat response no matter what she told him. The interview climaxed with Bailey asking the contestant what she needed most and why she wanted to win the title of Queen for a Day. Often the request was for medical care or therapeutic equipment to help a chronically ill child, but sometimes it was as simple as the need for a hearing aid, a new washing machine, or a refrigerator. Many women broke down sobbing as they described their plights, and Bailey was always quick to comfort them and offer a clean white handkerchief to dry their eyes. The more pitiful the story a contestant had, the likelier the studio audience was to reach the applause meter's highest level. The winner, to the musical accompaniment of Pomp and Circumstance, would be draped in a sable-trimmed red velvet robe, given a glittering jeweled crown to wear, placed on a velvet-upholstered throne, and handed a dozen long-stemmed roses to hold as she wept, often uncontrollably, while her list of prizes was announced. The prizes began with the necessary help the woman had requested, but might include a vacation, a night on the town with her husband or escort, silver-plated flatware, an array of kitchen appliances, and a selection of fashion clothing. The losing contestants were each given smaller prizes; no one went away from the show without a meaningful gift. Bailey's trademark sign-off was 'This is Jack Bailey, wishing we could make every woman a queen--for every single day!' A 1970 short-lived syndicated revival of QFAD quickly fell into disfavor with viewers when it was revealed the 'contestants' were actually actresses.
Tags: Queen  For  A  Day  reality  TV  game  show 
Added: 24th February 2011
Views: 1381
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Susan Hawk Survivor Speech Survivor contestant Susan Hawk unloaded on fellow contestants Richard Hatch and Kelly Wiglesworth in a memorable speech during the Final Tribal Council of the first season:
Tags:  
Added: 6th December 2014
Views: 721
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Addie Joss Benefit Game 1911 On July 24, 1911 the first 'all-star game' in MLB history took place at League Park in Cleveland. It predated the first official ASG by 22 years. The contest was a benefit game to raise money for the widow and two children of Cleveland pitcher Addie Joss, who had died of meningitis at age 31 three months earlier. Joss was a hugely popular and dominant pitcher whose death stunned the baseball world. The plan was to have a team of American League All-Stars face Joss' Indians. The idea was popular with the players but not so with AL president Ban Johnson who was worried about the disruption of the AL schedule. He threatened to fine any players who left their clubs to participate in the benefit game. In the end public pressure persuaded Johnson to withdraw his objection. The All-Stars, led by Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, and several other future Hall-of-Famers, won the game 5-3. More than $11,000 was raised for the Joss family. Box seats that normally cost $1 were sold by special subscription for $100 apiece.
Tags: baseball  Addie  Joss  All-star  game  Cleveland 
Added: 12th July 2011
Views: 1151
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Posted By: Lava1964
1963 Contest For Women Only The ad copy reads, Only women are eligible to enter which means you have a much better chance to win. Entries from Alaska are not allowed. The prize is free installation and one year's EXTENSION service using the Princess phone which is provided; you can choose the color. After one year, if you don't pick up the yearly extension service costs, say adios to your extension service and the Princess telephone! Obviously, you have to have another telephone in the house in order to qualify for this contest. Boy have things changed.
Tags: 1963  PrincessPhone  ATandT  contest  Seventeen  magazine  DialSoap   
Added: 12th July 2011
Views: 1025
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Posted By: AngoraSox
You Bet Your Life - Bill Cosby Remake One of the most enduring game shows of all time was the original You Bet Your Life. It was hosted by Groucho Marx first on radio in 1947 and continued well into the television era until 1961. The quiz game was clearly secondary to the superbly ad-libbed interviews Marx had with the contestants. A new version of You Bet Your Life, hosted by Bill Cosby, aired from September 7, 1992 to June 4, 1993 in syndication. Cosby was joined on this show by a female announcer and sidekick, Robbi Chong; she was referred to as "Renfield." Organist Shirley Scott contributed the jazzy theme music. The program was taped in Philadelphia. Three couples competed, each couple playing the game individually. After the couple was introduced, they spent time chatting with Cosby. When the interview was done, the game began. Each couple was staked with $750 and were then asked three questions within a category presented at the start of the game. Before each question, the couple made a wager, which would be added to their winnings if they were correct or subtracted if they were incorrect. The secret word in this version, worth $500, was represented by a blackbird wearing a sweatshirt from Temple University, Cosby's alma mater. The couple with the most money played for an additional $10,000. Although Cosby was renowned for ad-libbing funny exchanges with audience members as part of his stand-up comedy routines, he was no Groucho Marx. (Who, besides Groucho, was?) Low ratings prompted the cancellation of the series after just one season.
Tags: remake  You  Bet  Your  Life  Bill  Cosby  syndicated 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 1137
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dr Joyce Brothers Wins Game Show Jackpot Dr. Joyce Brothers is known for being a television personality, psychologist and newspaper columnist. However, she first gained national fame in late 1955 by winning the jackpot on The $64,000 Question--a quiz program on which she appeared as a boxing expert. Originally she had not planned to choose boxing as her topic. However, the show's sponsors thought it would be an attention-grabbing gimmick to have a female answer boxing questions, so she agreed. A voracious reader, Brothers studied every reference book about boxing that she could find; she would later tell reporters that her good memory allowed her to accrue a wealth of information about the sweet science--so much so that she had no difficulty with even the toughest questions. When the TV quiz show scandals broke in 1959, Brothers insisted that she had never cheated, nor had she ever been given any answers to questions in advance. Subsequent investigations verified that she had indeed won her jackpot honestly. (No contestant on The $64,000 Question was ever proven to have cheated.) Brothers' success on The $64,000 Question earned her a chance to be the color commentator for CBS during a middleweight title match between Carmen Basilio and Sugar Ray Robinson. She thus became the first woman ever to be a boxing announcer.
Tags: Dr  Joyce  Brothers  boxing  game  show 
Added: 22nd September 2011
Views: 1765
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tell It To Groucho - 1962 After hosting the hugely successful You Bet Your Life on TV from 1950 to 1961, 70-year-old Groucho Marx was persuaded to return to the tube with Tell It To Groucho--a short-lived game show that aired for just five months on CBS in 1962 before being axed. The show was similar to YBYL, where the ad-libbed comedic banter between Groucho and the contestants was far more important than the game. This time the game portion was almost an afterthought. To win $500, contestants had to identify celebrities whose pictures were only shown for a split second. The show had a rotten time slot. It was directly pitted against Dr. Kildare on NBC and My Three Sons on ABC. Early in the show's run, Groucho wrote to a friend and described his on-air assistant, Patty Harmon, as "a sprightly young doll with oversized knockers who leaps around the stage with all the abandon of a young doe being pursued by an elderly banker". (Harmon was a onetime runner-up in the Miss Connecticut pageant and had been a contestant on YBYL. She later got some acting gigs as Joy Harmon. Her most famous role was in Cool Hand Luke; she's the busty blonde who provocatively washes her car within eyeshot of the aroused chain-gang prisoners.) Groucho never had another regular TV show after the last episode of Tell It To Groucho aired on May 31, 1962.
Tags: Joy  Patty  Harmon  Groucho  Marx  Tell  It  to  Groucho  game  show 
Added: 5th October 2011
Views: 3368
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
First World Series Night Game - 1971 On Wednesday, October 13, 1971, Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh hosted the first night game in World Series history. The hometown Pirates defeated the Baltimore Orioles 4-3 to level the series at two games apiece. (Pittsburgh would eventually prevail in seven games.) As early as 1949, lights had been turned on during some WS games as dusk approached, but never before had a WS game been scheduled for after sunset. By 1973, all WS weekday games were contested at night. There hasn't been a WS day game since 1987.
Tags: baseb  World  Series  night  game  first 
Added: 23rd October 2011
Views: 2549
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jeopardy Champion Jason Keller Jason Keller, 30, a private tutor from Highland Park, NJ, won $213,900 as a nine-time champion on Jeopardy! He won for the first time on the December 16, 2011 episode and successfully defended his title eight times until losing on the December 29 episode. His winnings rank sixth in the syndicated show's 27-year history. (It should be noted that contestants were limited to five wins until September 2003.) I know Jason through his connection to tournament Scrabble. (He is one of the top 100 Scrabble players in North America; he finished 19th at the U.S. Nationals in 2011.) Jason attended a Scrabble tourney in Albany, NY just in time to watch the broadcast where he was defeated! He was justifiably greeted by his fellow Scrabble players with great enthusiasm. Jason was called upon to make a speech. He told the crowd a few interesting tidbits about his experiences on Jeopardy!: Tapings are done just two days per week (Tuesday and Wednesday). Jason's shows were taped in mid and late October. Jason won his first game on the last show of the Tuesday taping. He then won all five shows of the Wednesday taping. He then had to fly home for a Scrabble event that weekend and fly back to Los Angeles for further tapings. He won two more games on the Tuesday taping before losing. Jason said he has to wait 120 days to get his winnings--and he will lose about 42 percent of them in taxes. All Jeopardy! contestants are responsible for their own travel and hotel costs. However, the champion of the final show on Wednesday is flown home and back to LA for the next week's taping(s) at the show's expense. In an interesting twist, the player who defeated Jason was Dave Leach--who himself became a six-time champion. The was the first time in Jeopardy! history that a super-champion (a player who won more than five games) was dethroned by another super-champion.
Tags: Jeopardy  Jason  Keller 
Added: 4th January 2012
Views: 3472
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 3133
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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