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Deep Blue Beats G. Kasparov in Chess February 10, 1997
Tags: Deep  Blue  beat  G.  Kasparov  Chess  IBM  computers  intelligence  man  made 
Added: 10th February 2015
Views: 882
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Posted By: Steve
Great Britain Adopts Decimal Currency - 1971 Although the idea had been discussed in the British parliament as early as 1824, it was not until Monday, February 15, 1971 that Great Britain finally adopted decimal currency (100 pence to the pound) and shelved the cumbersome monetary system of 240 pence to the pound that had thoroughly confused foreigners. Prior to Decimal Day, there were 12 pennies in a shilling and 20 shillings to a pound. There were also lesser denominations of coins. For example, a farthing was worth a quarter of a penny. Then there were the weird coins such as the half crown which was worth two shillings and sixpence--or 30 pence--or one-eighth of a pound. British banks shut down on Wednesday, February 10, 1971 at 3 p.m. in order to have nearly five days to convert all their accounts from old money to new money. (As few banks were computerized in 1971, most of the recalculations had to be done manually.) In the months leading up to Decimal Day, the British government produced a wide array of pamphlets designed to educate the public about the 'new money.' There were even songs produced for the same purpose. Typically, older Brits were mostly against the change and had the most difficulty adapting to it.
Tags: British  money  decimalization  change 
Added: 2nd March 2015
Views: 817
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Posted By: Lava1964
Speak and Spell Commercial Tags: Speak  and  Spell  Commercial  Texas  Instruments  learning  instruments  early  computer  1980 
Added: 27th April 2015
Views: 822
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Posted By: Cathy
Early Mac Commerical Tags: Early  Mac  Commerical  Apple  Computers  Software  Encarta  Quicken  Microsoft  Office  blast  from  the  past 
Added: 27th April 2015
Views: 987
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Posted By: Cathy
Windows 95- It Is Safe To Turn Off Your Computer Tags: Windows  95-  It  Is  Safe  To  Turn  Off  Your  Computer 
Added: 5th May 2015
Views: 1198
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Posted By: pfc
Cellphones Through The Years Tags: Cellphones  Through  The  Years  telephones  smartphones  computers 
Added: 7th August 2015
Views: 754
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Remington Computer Commercial Tags: Remington  Computer  Commercial    UNIVAC  mainframe  computer  payroll  business 
Added: 3rd September 2015
Views: 1360
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Posted By: Cliffy
The New Monkees - 1987 Sitcom Flop The original sitcom The Monkees aired on NBC for two seasons (1966 to 1968). Along with winning an Emmy for best sitcom of 1966, the original Monkees were responsible for several top 40 hit songs, including I'm a Believer, Last Train to Clarksville, and Pleasant Valley Sunday. A very successful nostalgic twentieth anniversary reunion tour by the group in 1986 wrongly convinced some folks in the syndicated TV world that the time was ripe for a second Monkees series to be produced for a new generation. It was a spectacular failure. Like the first Monkees series, extensive tryouts were held to find four actors to play the roles. Unlike the first series, only actors with proven musical abilities were considered. In the end the four main cast members of The New Monkees were Marty Ross, Dino Kovas, Larry Saltis, and Jared Chandler. On the show, the band lived in a large mansion with a butler named Manford (played by Gordon Oas-Heim). The mansion had numerous unexplored rooms and was the main source of the lads' adventures. Instead of a normal kitchen and dining room, the house featured a full diner with a waitress named Rita (played by former exercise instructor Bess Motta of 20 Minute Workout fame). Also present in the mansion was a talking computer called Helen (voiced by Lynnie Godfrey) who used to work for the Defense Department but found that she preferred rock music over missiles. The plots routinely forced the audience to suspend reality. One episode had Larry falling asleep on a copy machine--resulting in numerous Larry clones creating chaos throughout the mansion. Neither sitcom nor music fans ever took to the show nor to the lone album the group produced. Disappointing ratings caused the show to be cancelled after just 13 episodes even though 22 episodes were scheduled to be produced for the first season. Mickey Dolenz, the drummer in the original group, said he wasn't at all surprised The New Monkees bombed. Invoking a Star Trek analogy, Dolenz likened it to "giving another actor pointy ears and expecting viewers to accept him as Mr. Spock." Moreover, the four original Monkees sued Columbia Television Pictures for using the group's name. The case was settled out of court. Bit of trivia: Russell Johnson (most famous for playing the role of the Professor on Gilligan's Island) was the only person to appear on both Monkees series. The New Monkees has never been made available on DVD.
Tags: New  Monkees  sitcom  flop 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 1312
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Posted By: Lava1964
Creating The Yellow First Down Marker Tags: Creating  The  Yellow  First  Down  Marker  NFL  National  Football  League  computer  generated  special  effects      football  broadcasts  Baltimore  Ravens  and  the  Cincinnati  Bengals  Sportvision  Inc 
Added: 7th February 2016
Views: 1231
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Posted By: Steve
Egad! Chess Computer Beats World Champ May 11, 1997 saw one of the most important milestones in human history occur. Strangely, it was attained at the expense of humans. On that date in New York City, Garry Kasparov, the reigning world chess champion and one of the greatest players of all time, lost the deciding game of a six-game series to an IBM computer nicknamed Deep Blue. Kasparov resigned after only 19 moves, giving Deep Blue the match with a record of two wins, one loss, and three draws. The previous year, Kasparov had beaten an inferior version of Deep Blue four games to two in a series played in Philadelphia. To those in the computer industry, the triumph of Deep Blue was a cause for celebration. To many chess followers and ordinary folks, however, the result was ominous: Artificial intelligence had surpassed one of the great minds in human history. Here is a six-minute video about the 1997 event.
Tags: chess  Deep  Blue  computer  Garry  Kasparov 
Added: 20th May 2017
Views: 1098
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Posted By: Lava1964

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