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America Comes of Age The Great Dust Bowl America Comes of Age Part Two: The Great Dust Bowl - Dreams into Nightmares Photos courtesy: U.S. Library of Congress http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/fsowhome.... Shorpy.com http://shorpy.com/ Audio Clips: Nebraska Educational Telecommunications Nebraska' PBS Station N.E.T. Wessels Living Farm History http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/ Music: Pete Seeger and Aaron Copeland conveived and produced by Dale Caruso
Tags:   Dust    Bowl    1930s    Migrants     
Added: 25th September 2008
Views: 1291
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Then and Now- Nichelle Nichols - Original Star Trek Not bad for 77!! Nichelle Nichols is an American actress, singer and voice artist. She sang with Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton before turning to acting. Her most famous role is that of communications officer Lieutenant Uhura aboard the USS Enterprise in the popular Star Trek television series.
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Added: 1st January 2010
Views: 1485
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Posted By: Cliffy
End of Western Union Telegrams 2006 On January 27, 2006, Western Union ended more than 150 years of telegram service. Beginning in 1854, the company began transmitting and transcribing telegraphed messages and delivering them to customers across the country. They heyday of the telegram was in the 1920s and 1930s when sending a message by telegraph was cheaper than making a long-distance telephone call. The word 'stop' was commonly used in the text of telegrams to end a sentence instead of a period because it was cheaper to send a four-letter word than a punctuation mark. Telegrams were often used for formal notifications and announcements, such as the one below to inform the recipient that he would share the 1958 Nobel Prize for Medicine/Physiology. During the Second World War, Western Union couriers were feared because they delivered official death notices to the families of servicemen. Eventually technology made telegrams obsolete and anachronistic. Only about 20,000 telegrams were sent in 2005, mostly by companies that were required to send legal notifications. On that final day of service, ten telegrams were delivered. They included a congratulatory message, a sympathy message, and, of course, a handful of messages from people who were trying to make history by sending the final Western Union telegram. Today Western Union exists only as a company that handles money transfers.
Tags: last  telegram  Western  Union  communications 
Added: 9th March 2010
Views: 3268
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chase- Get It On As the 1970s began, Bill Chase found himself thinking of creating his dream band. The group evolved over six months into the four trumpets, four rhythm instruments and one vocalist arrangement which earned the group a "Best New Artist" Grammy nomination 1971. When his group Chase blasted on the scene with "Get It On," The trip to the top was swift. Chase was soon in demand by Johnny Carson, The Smothers Brothers and many of the other hot variety shows on television. In 1974, Chase chartered a plane to take him and three band members to a performance in Jackson, MN. The weather was bad with a low ceiling, and the airport in Jackson had little communications equipment. The plane went down, but was not found until the next day. There were no survivors.
Tags: Chase-  Get  It  On 
Added: 4th May 2010
Views: 1620
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Newton Minow - Vast Wasteland Speech Despite being just 35 years old, Newton Minow became the head of the Federal Communications Commission in 1961 shortly after John F. Kennedy became president. During the 1960 election campaign, Robert Kennedy and Minow had long passionate discussions about the state of television and its influence on America. Minow became a vocal critic of the medium. Famously, in a speech given to the National Association of Broadcasters convention on May 9, 1961, Minow was extremely critical of television broadcasters for not doing more, in Minow's view, to serve the public interest. His phrase, 'vast wasteland,' is remembered years afterward. Minow said, 'When television is good, nothing—-not the theater, not the magazines or newspapers-— nothing is better. But when television is bad, nothing is worse. I invite you each of you to sit down in front of your television set when your station goes on the air and stay there for a day without a book, without a magazine, without a newspaper, without a profit and loss sheet or a rating book to distract you. Keep your eyes glued to that set until the station signs off. I can assure you that what you will observe is a vast wasteland.' While some Americans applauded Minow's assault on commercial television as a welcome criticism of excessive violence and frivolity, others criticized it as an elitist, snobbish attack on programming that many viewers enjoyed. Still others viewed it as government interference with private enterprise. Related trivia: The S. S. Minnow of the 1964–1967 television show Gilligan's Island was sarcastically named for Minow to express the producers' displeasure with his assessment of the quality of television.
Tags: FCC  Newton  Minow  television  vast  wasteland  speech 
Added: 3rd February 2011
Views: 2777
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Posted By: Lava1964
Niagara Falls Dries Up - 1848 The photo below is an aerial view of what Niagara Falls usually looks like. But for a period of about 40 hours on March 29-31, 1848 Niagara Falls stopped. No water flowed over the great cataract for the first time in recorded history. Not surprisngly people went a little nuts. Niagara Falls was already a big tourist attraction by 1848. Villages sprouted on both the U.S. and Canadian sides of the river to accommodate the sightseeing throngs. Residents also built waterwheels to harness the Niagara River’s power to run mills and drive machinery in factories. An American farmer out for a stroll shortly before midnight on March 29 was the first to notice something. Actually, he noticed the absence of something--the thundering roar of the falls. When he went to the river’s edge, he saw hardly any water. Came the dawn of March 30, people awoke to an unaccustomed silence. The mighty Niagara was a mere trickle. Mills and factories shut down because the waterwheels had stopped. The bed of the river was exposed. Fish died and turtles floundered about. Brave—or foolish— people walked on the river bottom, picking up exposed guns, bayonets and tomahawks as souvenirs. Was it the end of the world? Perhaps it was divine retribution for what some folks thought was a U.S. war of aggression against Mexico? In an age of religious revivals, theological explanations abounded. Fearing the end of the world, thousands of people filled special church services praying for the falls to start flowing and the world to continue, or for salvation and forgiveness of their sins as the Last Judgment approached. Because communications were haphazard in 1848, no one knew why the falls had stopped. But from Buffalo, NY word eventually arrived that explained the bare falls and dry riverbed. Strong southwest gale winds had pushed huge chunks of ice to the extreme northeastern tip of Lake Erie, blocking the lake’s outlet into the head of the Niagara River. The ice jam had become an ice dam. And just as news traveled inward, news also traveled outward. Thousands came from nearby cities and towns to look at the spectacle of Niagara Falls without water. People crossed the riverbed on foot, on horseback and in horse-drawn buggies. Mounted U.S. Army cavalry soldiers paraded up and down the empty Niagara River. It was a potentially hazardous act for there was no telling when the rushing waters might return. One entrepreneur used the hiatus to do some safety work. The Maid of the Mist sightseeing boat had been taking tourists on river rides below the falls since 1846, and there were some dangerous rocks it always had to avoid. Since the river had ceased running and the rocks were in plain sight, the boat’s owner sent workers out to blast the rocks away with explosives. March 30 was not the only dry day. No water flowed over the falls throughout the daylight hours of March 31. But that night a distant rumble came from upriver. The low-pitched noise drew nearer and louder. Suddenly a wall of water came roaring down the upper Niagara River and over the falls with a giant thunder. The ice jam had cleared. To the relief of the locals, the river was running again.
Tags: Niagara  Falls  dries  up  natural  history 
Added: 21st March 2011
Views: 3457
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Posted By: Lava1964
Look Magazine Look was a hugely popular general-interest magazine that focused more on photography than articles. Published in Des Moines, Iowa, it began in February 1937 and was intended to be a monthly periodical. Within weeks, more than a million copies were bought of each issue, and it became a bi-weekly. By 1948 it sold 2.9 million copies per issue. Circulation reached 3.7 million in 1954, and peaked at 7.75 million in 1969. Its advertising revenue peaked in 1966 at $80 million. Of the leading general-interest, large-format magazines, Look had a circulation second only to Life and ahead of The Saturday Evening Post, which closed in 1969, and Collier's, which folded in 1956. Look was published under various company names: Look, Inc. (1937–45), Cowles Magazines (1946–65), and Cowles Communications, Inc. (1965–71). Its New York editorial offices were located in the architecturally distinctive 488 Madison Avenue, dubbed the Look Building, now on the National Register of Historic Places. Beginning in 1963, Norman Rockwell, after closing his career with the Saturday Evening Post, began making illustrations for Look. Look ceased publication with its issue of October 19, 1971, the victim of a $5 million loss in revenues in 1970 (with television cutting deeply into its advertising revenues), a slack economy and rising postal rates. Circulation was still at 6.5 million when it closed.
Tags: Look  magazine  photography 
Added: 9th April 2011
Views: 1289
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bell Canada Dieppe Commercial I might as well post the best Canadian commercial ever made: a Bell Canada spot that aired in the 1990s. A young man surprises his grandfather back home in Canada by phoning him from Dieppe. (It might need some explaining to non-Canadians unfamiliar with the Dieppe Raid during the Second World War. Nearly two full years before D-Day, on August 19, 1942, more than 6,000 Allied troops--the vast majority Canadian--were sent on an ill-conceived mission across the English Channel to the French coastal city of Dieppe. They landed on a beach with high tides, baseball-sized rocks that inhibited vehicles, and high cliffs heavily fortified by German machine guns. Their mission was to destroy enemy defenses and communications. It was an unmitigated disaster. Of the 6,086 troops who landed, 3,623 were either killed or captured. Historians argue about the raid's value to this day. Some claim it was a total waste of human life. Others say the costly lessons of Dieppe led to the successful Allied amphibious landings later in the war in North Africa and Normandy.)
Tags: Bell  Canada  Dieppe  commercial 
Added: 6th July 2013
Views: 1799
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Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Sgt Kinchloe Ivan Dixon played prisoner of war Sgt. James Kinchloe on the CBS sitcom Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1970. By rank, Sgt. Kinchloe (nicknamed "Kinch") was third in command of the prisoners who stealthily engaged in sabotage and espionage capers to thwart the German war machine. Sgt. Kinchloe was a "communicatins specialist" whose typical job was to send and decode radio messages. After five seasons, Dixon grew tired of the role and sought more challenging TV and movie assignments, including directing. He once complained to the producers of Hogan's Heroes that only a few of the episodes centered around Kinch and that his most common line was "Message from London, Colonel." He left the show after season five concluded in 1970. For the final season, a new black prisoner, Cpl. Richard Baker (played by Kenneth Washington), replaced Kinch and took over his position as the Heroes' communications specialist. Kinch's absence from the cast was never explained. Based on the show's premise and ongoing plot, Sgt. Kinchloe's total disappearance is hard to accept. The prisoners made certain that Stalag 13 was supposedly "escape-proof" to ensure that the easily manipulated Colonel Klink would appear efficient and remain as the camp's commander. Thus one would think that Kinchloe did not escape. So what the heck happened to him?
Tags: Kinchloe  Hogans  Heroes  Ivan  DIxon 
Added: 5th November 2014
Views: 2291
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Posted By: Lava1964

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