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ELVIS  Suspicious Minds  Live From Hawaii At this time in his life, I think Elvis was at his best. This song was widely regarded as the single that jump-started his career after his successful '68 Comeback Special. It was his eighteenth number-one single in the United States. Rolling Stone later ranked it #91 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Not bad for a country boy from Mississippi.
Tags: elvis  presley  music  entertainers  Suspicious  Minds    Live  From  Hawaii 
Added: 15th August 2007
Views: 2870
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Jan and Dean Surf City Video Jan Berry and Dean Torrence, both born in Los Angeles, began singing together as a duo after football practice at University High School. They first performed on stage as The Barons at a high school dance. Their first commercial success was "Jennie Lee" (1958), a top 10 ode to a local, Hollywood, Ca, burlesque performer that Jan Berry recorded with fellow Baron Arnie Ginsburg. "Jan & Arnie" released three singles in all. After Torrence returned from a stint in the army reserves, Jan Berry and Dean Torrence began to make music as "Jan and Dean". Jan and Dean's commercial peak came between 1963 and 1966, as the duo scored an impressive sixteen Top 40 hits on the Billboard and Cash Box magazine charts, with a total of twenty-six chart hits over eight years. Jan and Brian Wilson collaborated on roughly a dozen hits and album cuts for Jan and Dean, including the number one national hit "Surf City" in 1963. Subsequent top 10 hits included "Drag City" (1963), "The Little Old Lady from Pasadena" (1964), and the eerily portentous "Dead Man's Curve" (1964). On April 12,1966, Berry received severe head injuries in a motor vehicle accident, ironically just a short distance from Dead Man's Curve in Los Angeles, two years after the song had become a hit. He was angry while driving because he had learned he was to be inducted into the military when had already completed two years of medical school, which he had been secretly attending. Berry had also separated from his girlfriend of seven years. As a result of his accident, Jan and Dean did not perform again until the mid-1970s, after the release of the feature film Deadman's Curve in 1978, which opened the doors for Jan and Dean to launch a successful and amazing comeback especially for Jan Berry. On February 3, 1978, CBS aired a made-for-TV movie about the duo entitled Deadman's Curve. The biopic starred Richard Hatch as Jan Berry and Bruce Davison as Dean Torrence, as well as appearances by Dick Clark, Wolfman Jack, and Mike Love and Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys. Following the release of the film, the duo made steps toward an official comeback that year, including touring with the Beach Boys. In the early 1980s, while Berry struggled to overcome drug addiction, Torrence toured briefly as "Mike & Dean," with Mike Love of the Beach Boys. But Berry got sober, beating the odds once again, and the duo reunited for good. Jan and Dean continued to tour on their own throughout the 1980s, 1990s, and into the new millennium with 1960s nostalgia providing them with a ready audience. On August 31, 1991, Berry married Gertie Filip at The Stardust Convention Centre in Las Vegas, Nevada. Torrence was Berry's best man at the wedding. Jan and Dean ended with Jan Berry's death on March 26, 2004, at the age of 62. Berry was an organ donor, and his body was cremated. On April 18, 2004, a "Celebration of Life" was held in Jan's memory at The Roxy Theatre on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, California. Celebrities attending the event included Dean Torrence, Lou Adler, Jill Gibson, and Nancy Sinatra. Also present were many family members, friends, and musicians associated with Jan and Dean and the Beach Boys.
Tags: jan  and  dean  surf  city  video 
Added: 15th October 2007
Views: 4299
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Posted By: Sophia
Sunset Boulevard   1950 Trailer to "Sunset Boulevard" directed by Billy Wilder, starring William Holden, Gloria Swanson, Erich von Stroheim, Cecil B. DeMille & Buster Keaton. Joe Gillis, an unsuccessful screenplay writer, escapes the finance men who are trying to reclaim his car by driving into the garage of an old mansion on Sunset Boulevard. Assumed to be someone else, he is led by Max the butler to the mansion's owner, silent film star Norma Desmond. Wishing to make a comeback, she hires him to rewrite her "Salome" script, then falls in love with him. Joe moves into the mansion as a kept man. Secretly, Joe is collaborating with a pretty young screenplay editor, Betty Schaefer, on another idea. Though she is engaged to his best friend, Artie Green, an assistant director, Betty falls in love with Joe. When Betty finds out about Norma, she asks him to leave Norma for her, but Joe can't unsettle her life, too. He decides, instead, to leave Hollywood. As he is leaving, a crazed Norma tries to stop him. I adore William Holden, he's simply gorgeous.
Tags: sunset  boulevard  william  holden  gloria  swanson 
Added: 20th October 2007
Views: 1903
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2034
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Elvis 68 Comeback Special 12 03 68 I don't think any other man ever looked this good in leather!!
Tags: elvis  presley  1968  comeback  special 
Added: 3rd December 2007
Views: 2512
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
I Would Do Anything For Love but i won't do that . . and here's some Meat Loaf TRIVIA: This was Meat Loaf's comeback song. In 1977, his album BAT OUT OF HELL, produced the hits "TWO OUT OF THREE AIN'T BAD," "PARADISE BY THE DASHBOARD LIGHT," and "YOU TOOK THE WORDS RIGHT OUTTA MY MOUTH," all written by piano player Jim Steinman. After a falling out with Steinman and difficulty in his personal life, Meat Loaf released several unsuccessful albums before reuniting with Steinman for Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell, which was considered a sequel to the 1977 album. This has a very similar sound to Meat Loaf's previous hits, and the bombastic, piano-driven style went over well with his old fans as well as a new generation of listeners, helping make this a massive hit...
Tags: Meat  Loaf        Bat  Out  Of  Hell        I  Would  Do  ANYTHING    For  Love  But  I  Won 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1253
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Posted By: Teresa
1979 Cotton Bowl - Final Seconds Here are the final seconds of the famous 1979 Cotton Bowl game between Notre Dame and Houston. The game has gone down in Fighting Irish lore as one of Notre Dame's greatest ever comebacks--and it was. It was also a game that very few people actually saw. It was played simultaneously with the Sugar Bowl game in which Penn State and Alabama were vying for the national championship, so most neutral viewers were tuned into that game. The stadium was less than half filled because a horrible ice storm descended on Dallas the night before, preventing many of the 72,000 ticketholders from even getting to the Cotton Bowl. The temperature was around 11 degrees Fahrenheit but the wind chill pushed the temperature to below zero, which chased even more people away. By the time the game ended, there may have been about 15,000 people in attendance. The high winds severely affected play. All but one scoring play occurred at the north end of the field. Notre Dame scored the game's first 12 points, but Houston scored the next 34 to take a 22-point lead into the fourth quarter. Notre Dame quarterback Joe Montana, playing his last collegiate game, was sidelined early, suffering badly from the flu. With a body temperature of only 96 degrees Fahrenheit, he was smothered in blankets and bolstered with bowls of instant chicken soup by Notre Dame's team physician. Montana famously returned to the game in the third quarter to be its hero. People, though, tend to forget Montana's awful stats for the game: He was only 13 for 34 and had four interceptions against just one touchdown pass. Kris Haines, who caught the game-tying touchdown pass, had a temperature of 102 degrees and had secretly hoped the overnight ice storm would cause the game to be postponed.
Tags: 1979  Cotton  Bowl  Notre  Dame  Houston  Joe  Montana 
Added: 24th December 2013
Views: 1700
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Posted By: Lava1964
George Foreman SI Cover Heavyweight champion George Foreman has been featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated seven times. This was his first time, June 18, 1973, when he was a surly fearsome fighter--not the warm and cuddly George he was during his remarkable comeback years.
Tags: George  Foreman  SI 
Added: 30th March 2008
Views: 888
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Posted By: Lava1964
Phil Esposito Rebukes Canadian Hockey Fans This is a Canadian classic: In a famous postgame interview from the 1972 Canada-USSR hockey series, Phil Esposito lashes out against Canadian fans and media who had been dumping on Canada's national team. Espo led the team to a dramatic comeback victory in the Soviet Union.
Tags: Phil  Esposito  interview 
Added: 7th June 2008
Views: 1001
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Tony Conigliaro Hard-luck ballplayer Tony Conigliaro of the Boston Red Sox was featured on the cover of this issue of Sports Illustrated from July 1970. Conigliaro was the favorite to win the American League's Rookie of the Year award in 1964, but he broke his arm in August. In 1965, at age 20, he led the AL in home runs with 32. Two years later, on Auugst 18, 1967, Conigliaro was hit in the face with a fastball thrown by Jack Hamilton of the Angels. The pitch broke Conigliaro's cheekbone and damaged his left retina. (The effects are shown in the SI cover photo.) The injury was so devastating that Conigliaro missed the entire 1968 season. He had good seasons in both 1969 and 1970, but lingering eye problems from his 1967 injury caused him to retire in 1971. Conigliaro attempted a brief comeback in 1975 only to retire again. In 1982, at age 37, he suffered a severe heart attack. Conigliaro was virtually in a vegetive state until his death in 1990 at age 45.
Tags: Tony  Conigliaro 
Added: 23rd June 2008
Views: 1174
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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