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McKinley Soap Babies Perhaps the oddest political collectible is this century-old “soap baby.” This baby wears a tag that says “My Papa will vote for McKinley,”
Tags: McKinley  Soap  Babies  soap  baby  My  Papa  will  vote  for  McKinley 
Added: 9th May 2014
Views: 1942
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Posted By: pfc
Civil War News Trading Cards Civil War News was a set of 88 collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists. The card set was characterized by vivid colors, graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (card #21 'Painful Death' being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person. The information was presented in newspaper-article fashion complete with a headline. The complete set of cards, including a checklist, was first printed for the American market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada. A&BC produced the sets in England. The cards came five to a wax pack with a stick of bubble gum. Also included in each package was a facsimile of Confederate paper currency. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips.
Tags: trading  cards  Civil  War  News 
Added: 9th February 2011
Views: 5937
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Posted By: Lava1964
Risque Bathing Beauty Postcard This postcard would have caused quite a few male hearts to beat faster when it was mass produced in the first decade of the 20th century. (By the way, the vehicle depicted here is called a bathing house. It was designed to serve as a portable changing room for swimmers.)
Tags: postcard  art  collectibles 
Added: 30th March 2012
Views: 2296
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nestle Magic Ball aka The Wonder Ball 1997 Better known as Nestle Wonder Ball is a spherical, thin shell of milk chocolate with candy inside, wrapped in foil, placed in a small box, and packaged with a collectible sticker. The product's slogan is "What's In the Wonder Ball?" Originally called Nestle Magic Ball, the product used to contain small figurines of Disney characters, similar to the Kinder Surprise which retails in Europe. However, due to choking hazard concerns, the product was withdrawn in 1997. The theme song for these was totally addicting: “Oh, I wonder, wonder, what’s in a Wonder Ball!”. Don’t act like you’re not singing it to yourself right now. Oh, and these amazing little candies came with a surprise candy inside, plus a sticker. Does it get much better?
Tags: Nestle  Magic  Ball  aka  The  Wonder  Ball  1997 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2089
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Posted By: masonx31
1916 Booby Quarter By the 1910s the Art Nouveau movement was influencing the designs of American coinage. In 1916 designer Hermon McNeil created what he thought was an attractive portrait of Lady Liberty for the new silver 25-cent piece. No red flags were raised as the design received official approval for mintage in late 1916 for distribution in January 1917. Instead of winning applause, however, the coin caused outrage because the Standing Liberty figure (as it is known to collectors) has her right breast exposed. Moralists decried the image as obscene and decadent. The public's response was so swift and negative that the Treasury Department modified the die for future strikes to cover the exposed breast with armor--even doing so without the official approval of Congress. Furthermore, the federal government did its best to recall the original allotment of 52,000 coins. That was easier said than done. First, any new coin is largely hoarded by collectors for its novelty. Second, the small mintage of these coins enhanced their desirability among collectors. Third, the infamy attached to this coin made it even more collectible than usual. Therefore most of the 1916 "booby quarters" did not stay in circulation very long before they were stashed away by average citizens as curiosity pieces (and perhaps erotic souvenirs). According to the Treasury Department, however, the public's moral outrage had nothing to do with the more modest revised design. It was supposedly symbolic. With war clouds looming, it was thought that Lady Liberty should be shown as fully protected by armor rather than being seen as partially exposed and vulnerable.
Tags: 1916  Standing  Liberty  quarter  breast  numismatics 
Added: 27th October 2016
Views: 1500
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Posted By: Lava1964

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