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Springhill Mining Disaster 1958 One of the first major 'ongoing' news stories to be covered live on television was the coal mining disaster in Springhill, Nova Scotia, Canada on October 23, 1958. That night 174 miners were trapped 13,000 feet below ground when a 'bump' caused a huge section of the mine to collapse. It was the third major disaster at the mine since 1891. Exactly 100 miners were rescued; some were trapped for five days before being saved. The bodies of the other 74 were all eventually recovered. Because of the heat at that depth, many of the corpses had badly decomposed by the time they were found. The mine never reopened.
Tags: Springhill  mine  disaster 
Added: 13th June 2009
Views: 3017
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Posted By: Lava1964
Evelyn Nesbit Scandal 1906 Evelyn Nesbit was a beautiful teenage model at the turn of the twentieth century. She supported herself and her widowed mother by posing for various artists and photographers. Her good looks won her a job as a Broadway chorus girl. This photo of her was taken in 1901 when Evelyn was 16. That same year she caught the eye of renowned architect and womanizer Stanford White--who was 47. White was married, but he often 'befriended' attractive teenage girls. Because of White's wealth and prestige, Evelyn's mother encouraged the relationship. White often 'entertained' young female friends in his lavish tower apartment at Madison Square Garden (which he designed). In the apartment were numerous strategically positioned mirrors and a red velvet swing. White apparently derived much pleasure watching his nubile young ladies cavort on it. According to Nesbit, White took advantage of her one night in the apartment after getting her to pose for suggestive photos in a yellow silk kimono and plying her with champagne. After deflowering Nesbit, White lost interest in her. Nesbit later became involved with Harry Thaw, the son of a Pittsburgh coal and railroad tycoon. Thaw himself was a possessive, sexual sadist who often beat Evelyn. Nevertheless, the two were married in 1905. Thaw became obsessed with Evelyn's stories about White. On June 25, 1906, Evelyn and Harry had two chance encounters with White. The first was at a cafe. The second was at a theatrical performance at Madison Square Garden's roof theatre. Thaw, who always carried a pistol, fired three shots into White's face at close range, killing him instantly. He is said to have shouted, 'You ruined my wife!' Thaw was tried twice for White's murder. The first trial ended with a deadlocked jury. At the second trial Thaw pled temporary insanity. Thaw's mother encouraged Evelyn to testify that White had raped her and Harry shot White to avenge her honor. Evelyn was supposed to get a quickie divorce and $1 million from the Thaw family. The divorce was granted, but Evelyn never got a penny. She was a minor celebrity for a few years and vanished into obscurity. She died in 1967 at the age of 82. Thaw was institutionalized until 1915 and died in 1947. Late in her life Nesbit claimed that Stanford White was the only man she ever truly loved. The story of the scandal was made into a 1955 movie starring Joan Collins titled The Girl In The Red Velvet Swing.
Tags: Evelyn  Nesbit  Stanford  White  Harry  Thaw  scandal 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 4486
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eureka cast iron wood/coal stove . . i LOVE IT!
Tags: eureka      cast  iron        wood        coal      stove 
Added: 12th July 2008
Views: 880
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Posted By: Teresa
Can You Hear the Bitter Cry of Children They were called Drivers, Greasers, Oilers, Pushers, Breakers, and Trappers. They salvaged coal from the slag heap, for10 cents for each hundred-pound sack or two dollars a ton. Boys as young as 8, working ten-hour days.. The Photography of Ben Shahn and Louis Wickes Hine Library of Congress shorpy.com http://shorpy.com/ Music: Pete Seeger and The Civil War Soundtrack, Ken Burns producer conceived and produced by: Dale Caruso
Tags: Coal    Mining    Childern     
Added: 26th September 2008
Views: 1726
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Jesse Jackson Paternity Scandal 2001 There's nothing more satisfying than seeing a prominent man of the cloth get caught with his pants down. In 2001, the Reverend Jesse Jackson was the latest in a long line of notable preachers to be caught doing some unholy business with thy rod and thy staff. Jackson, a father of five who had been married since 1962, admitted to fathering a daughter with Karin Stanford in 1999. He was 58 years old at the time. Stanford was the head of Jackson's Rainbow/PUSH office in Washington, D.C. The Rainbow/PUSH Coalition had paid several thousand dollars in hush money disguised as 'moving and contracting expenses' to Stanford. When the story broke, another $40,000 in hush money intended for Stanford was stopped. The scandal drove the omnipresent Jackson out of the public eye for several months, but, as this doctored photo shows, it didn't stop people from cackling.
Tags: Jesse  Jackson  paternity  scandal 
Added: 23rd September 2009
Views: 1618
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Posted By: Lava1964
USS Maine Baseball Team The American battleship USS Maine mysteriously exploded in Havana Harbor on February 15, 1898. About three-quarters of the ship's crew perished. Only 16 sailors onboard were completely uninjured. Accusations of sabotage led to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. (Evidence from modern investigations of the wreck suggests that a spontaneous internal explosion of coal near the ship's magazine likely caused the explosion--not sabotage.) Be that as it may, here is a photo of the USS Maine's baseball team. The man standing at the top left, J.H. Bloomer, was the only team member to survive the explosion.
Tags: USS  Maine  baseball  team 
Added: 18th September 2011
Views: 1711
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Posted By: Lava1964
Aberfan Disaster - 1966 At 9.15 am on Friday, October 21, 1966 a enormous mountain of excavated coal mining debris (known to coal miners as a waste tip) slid down a mountainside into the mining village of Aberfan, near Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. The waste tips, which had been building up for 50 years, had become heavy and saturated due to a week of rainy weather. The debris slide first destroyed a farm cottage in its path, killing all the occupants. At Pantglas Junior School, just below, the children had just returned to their classes after singing All Things Bright and Beautiful at their assembly. The tipping gang up the mountain had seen the slide start, but could not raise the alarm because their telephone cable had been repeatedly stolen. (The Tribunal of Inquiry later established that the disaster happened so quickly that a telephone warning would not have saved any lives regardless.) Down in the village, nobody saw anything, but everybody heard the noise as about 40,000 cubic metres of debris crashed into the school at a depth of 39 feet. Gaynor Minett, an eight-year-old student, remembered four years later, "It was a tremendous rumbling sound and all the school went dead. You could hear a pin drop. Everyone just froze in their seats. I just managed to get up and I reached the end of my desk when the sound got louder and nearer, until I could see the black out of the window. I can't remember any more but I woke up to find that a horrible nightmare had just begun in front of my eyes." The slide engulfed the school and about 20 houses in the village before coming to rest. Then there was total silence. George Williams, who was trapped in the wreckage, remembered that "In that silence you couldn't hear a bird or a child." All able-bodied persons in the village rushed to the scene with whatever implements they could find to begin digging through the mess to search for survivors. None were found after 11 a.m., but it took nearly a week to recover all the bodies. The death toll in the Aberfan disaster was 144--of which 116 were school children. That accounted for about half the school's enrolment. Five teachers were killed too. An inquiry later blamed the National Coal Board (NCB) for ignoring warnings from years earlier about the potential hazards of the growing waste tips. Families of the victims were eventually compensated 500 British pounds by the NCB for each loved one who had perished.
Tags: Aberfan  Wales  disaster  coal 
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 2354
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Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 840
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Posted By: Lava1964
Henry Ford Invents Charcoal Most people realize that Henry Ford was responsible for the assembly line--a groundbreaking factory innovation that made the manufacturing of automobiles (and everything else) go much faster. Few people, however, know that Ford also invented modern charcoal briquets! Amazingly, Ford's auto assembly line led to the development of the blackened fuel chunks. Here's what happened: One day in the 1920s Ford visited his Dearborn automobile plant and was aghast at the amount of wood that was wasted in the manufacture of his Model T cars. Ford found all types of waste to be unacceptable, so he wanted the wood bits left over from his cars' wheels and interiors to be put to a good and profitable use. He figured that since wood chips were highly flammable, they could be used as a handy portable fuel source. He consulted with some chemists and came up with the idea of charcoal pieces suitable for barbecues. Furthermore, they fit in nicely with promotional literature of the era that encouraged American consumers to buy Ford automobiles for peaceful, long drives in the country. What better way to cap off a serene weekend drive than to have a cookout using Ford's charcoal? This photo shows a package of 1920s briquets bearing the familiar Ford logo.
Tags: Henry  Ford  charcoal  inventor 
Added: 11th February 2016
Views: 864
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Posted By: Lava1964

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