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Bob Beamon Shatters Long Jump Record Back in 2007 I posted another video on this topic, but this one is much better in quality--and substance. To me this clip shows the greatest single individual accomplishment in the history of sports: Bob Beamon obliterating the world record for the long jump in 1968. Going into the Mexico City Olympics, Bob Beamon was having a bad year on the international athletics circuit. His teammate, Ralph Boston, was thought to be the best hope for the USA to win the gold medal in the long jump. That all changed on the first jump of the finals. Beamon executed a technically flawless leap and seemed to accelerate in mid air. When he landed there was a problem: Beamon had surpassed the officials' ability to measure the jump with the equipment they had available. The existing world record was 27 feet 4.75 inches. During the tense time when everyone was waiting for a measurement, Boston told Beamon, "Bob, I think it's past 29 feet." Incredulous, Beamon replied, "What happened to 28 feet?" After an agonizingly long delay because an old-fashioned tape measure had to be found, Beamon's jump was measured at 8.90 meters. That's 29 feet 2.5 inches. Beamon had surpassed the old mark by 21.75 inches. To put that into proper perspective, in the previous 32 years the world record for the long jump had advanced only eight inches. Beamon started to celebrate but was quickly overcome by the enormity of what he had done. He collapsed on the infield and wept uncontrollably; his body became limp like a rag doll. Some people credit Beamon's leap to the high altitude of Mexico City, but if that were the case it would have helped the other jumpers too. No one else even came close to the old world record! Beamon's record stood for nearly 23 years. Although it was broken by Mike Powell in 1991, Beamon's jaw-dropping achievement is a testament to untapped human potential.
Tags: Bob  Beamon  long  jump  world  record  Mexico  City  Olympics 
Added: 27th June 2015
Views: 1063
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Davey - Boxings First TV Creation Chuck Davey, a slick left-handed boxer from Detroit who earned two degrees from Michigan State University, was the sport's first "television creation" in the early 1950s. Davey traveled to London as a member of the 1948 U.S. Olympic boxing team as an alternate but never competed in the Games. He turned pro in the late 1940s. At a time when boxing was hugely popular and it was possible to watch live televised pro bouts six nights per week, Chuck Davey fit the bill perfectly. He was good-looking, intelligent, popular enough be be pictured twice on the cover of The Ring magazine, and talented enough to win, but he possessed feather fists so his bouts often went the distance or close to it. (This pleased the networks and their sponsors as all the scheduled commercial breaks would be attained.) Over the years the quality of Davey's opposition has been questioned--and he certainly fought his share of tomato cans--but Davey did beat capable fighters such as Ike Williams, Carmen Basilio, and Rocky Graziano in his ascension up the ladder. After compiling 37 wins and two draws in his first 39 fights, Davey earned a shot at Kid Gavilan's world welterweight crown on February 11, 1953 in Chicago. Gavilan, who entered the ring as a 14-5 betting favorite, realized quickly that Davey had no ability to hurt him, so he just methodically wore Davey down. In the third round a flurry of punches knocked Davey down for the first time in his career. Over the next few rounds Gavilan toyed with Davey, occasionally switching to a southpaw stance just for the fun of it. In the ninth round, Gavilan floored Davey three more times. The fight was stopped by Davey's corner before round 10. Davey was pretty much discredited as a title threat after the bad loss to Gavilan. At one point he lost four out of five fights. He won two bouts in 1955 and then retired with an overall pro record of 42-5-2 with 26 knockouts. In 1998, Davey was paralyzed in a swimming mishap when a large ocean wave violently slammed him onto a beach. Davey died in 2002 at age 77.
Tags: boxing  Chuck  Davey  TV 
Added: 28th June 2015
Views: 1128
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Blizzard of 1977 The winter of 1976-77 was especially brutal in New York state and Pennsylvania. In late January 1977 some schools closed for a whole week and entire communities basically shut down because of the brutal cold and heavy snowfalls. This video is a montage of photos taken during the crisis along with a CBS radio news broadcast of the event.
Tags: 1977  blizzard  CBS  news 
Added: 13th September 2015
Views: 1121
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Happy Days - Joanie Falls For Potsie Almost a year ago I posted a clip from my favorite Happy Days episode: They Call It Potsie Love. However, the source video has since been removed. (Undaunted, I'm posting it again; this time the Italian version! Don't worry; there's only a moment of Italian in the clip.) The plot revolves around Joanie Cunningham developing a major crush on her brother's friend Potsie Webber. Her crush begins when Potsie wants to practise the song "Put Your Head on My Shoulders," but claims he can only sing it passionately if he sings it to a girl. Since 14-year-old Joanie is the closest thing to a girl available, he sings it to her. Her facial expressions say it all.
Tags: Happy  Days  They  Call  It  Potsie  Love  Joanie  Potsie 
Added: 30th October 2015
Views: 2306
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 1062
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bomb Destroys CA Flight 11 - 1962 On Tuesday, May 22, 1962 a deadly act of madness caused Continental Airlines Flight #11 to be blown out of the sky. Eight crew members and 37 passengers perished. To date it is the worst airline disaster ever to occur in the skies over Missouri. The doomed flight departed Chicago's O'Hare Airport at 8:35 p.m. for Kansas City, MO. At the last second, Thomas G. Doty arrived at the departure gate. Although the airplane doors had been closed--and airline policy prohibits doors from being reopened--the doors were improperly reopened and Doty was permitted to board the aircraft. The flight was absolutely routine until the plane approached the Mississippi River. At that point the pilot informed air traffic control that he was deviating from the planned course to avoid severe thunderstorms in the area. In the vicinity of Centerville, IA, the radar image of the aircraft suddenly disappeared from the scope of Flight Following Service in Waverly, IA. It had nothing to do with inclement weather. At approximately 9:17 p.m. an explosion occurred in the right rear lavatory resulting in separation of the airplane's tail section from the fuselage. The remaining aircraft structure pitched nose-down violently, causing the engines to tear off, after which it fell into uncontrollable gyrations. The fuselage of the Boeing 707, minus the aft 38 feet, and with part of the left and most of the right wing intact, struck an alfalfa field on the ground. Most of the fuselage was found near Unionville, MO, but the engines and parts of the tail section and left wing were found up to six miles away from the main wreckage area. Of the 45 individuals on board, 44 were already dead when rescuers reached the crash site. One passenger, 27-year-old Takehiko Nakano of Evanston, IL, was barely alive when rescuers found him among the wreckage, but he later succumbed to fatal internal injuries. Another victim, Fred P. Herman, was a recipient of the United States Medal of Freedom. In their investigation of the crash, FBI agents discovered that late-arriving passenger Thomas G. Doty, a married man with a five-year-old daughter, had purchased a life insurance policy from Mutual of Omaha for $150,000, the maximum available. He further augmented that coverage with a flight insurance policy worth another $150,000 that he purchased just before departure. Doty had recently been arrested for armed robbery and was to soon face a preliminary hearing in the matter. Investigators determined that Doty had purchased six sticks of dynamite--at 29 cents apiece--shortly before the flight. An examination of the wreckage determined that Doty's dynamite bomb was detonated in the lavatory. His motive was purely financial: His wife and daughter would be able to collect $300,000 of life insurance. His widow attempted to collect on the insurance, but when Doty's death was ruled a suicide, the policies were voided.
Tags: crime  bomb  air  disaster  Flight  11 
Added: 15th December 2015
Views: 1337
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Posted By: Lava1964
Meco--Close Encounters of the Third Kind Tags: Meco--Close  Encounters  of  the  Third  Kind  Disco  Domenico  Monardo  Encounters  of  Every  Kind 
Added: 25th February 2016
Views: 379
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Posted By: Old Fart
1909 World Series Scorecard Before electric scoreboards came along, fans who wanted to follow a baseball game closely kept personal scorecards. (Some still do, God bless them!) This skill, of course, required an attention span which is something of a dying trait these days. This scorecard is from the 1909 World Series between the Detroit Tigers and Pittsburgh Pirates. Notice how Pittsburgh is spelled without the "h." This is not a misprint. At the time the U.S. Post Office wanted to standardize the spellings all American cities that ended with "burgh" to make them "burg." Everyone complied for a while, but after a couple of decades many cities slowly reverted back to the spelling as it appeared on their charters. Oh, yeah: Pittsburgh won the 1909 World Series in seven games.
Tags: baseball  scorecard  1909  World  Series 
Added: 14th June 2016
Views: 971
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Posted By: Lava1964
I Love Lucy - Five Santas This holiday-themed tag appeared at the end of the I Love Lucy episode that aired on December 24, 1951. It became something of a tradition as it was aired in both 1952 and 1953 at the end of the episode that fell closest to Christmas day.
Tags: I  Love  Lucy  tag  Five  Santas 
Added: 24th March 2019
Views: 345
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Howard Unruh - Camden NJ Mass Murderer On Tuesday, September 6, 1949, 28-year-old Howard Unruh shot and killed 13 people in Camden, NJ in a space of just 12 minutes. Three other victims suffered non-fatal wounds. The calm demeanor Unruh showed during shootings came to be known as "Camden's Walk of Death." Unruh, a decorated Second World War combat veteran, was a closet homosexual who believed he was the target of malicious gossip. The previous evening a date had failed to meet him at a local movie theater for a late-night screening. An angry Unruh stayed to watch the movie by himself and arrived home at about 3 a.m. to find that a fence he had erected between his house and his neighbor's adjacent lot to resolve a property dispute had been taken down, further aggravating him. Later that morning, Unruh suddenly snapped at his mother (whom he lived with) during breakfast. He chased her out of the house. At 9:20 a.m. Unruh proceeded on his murderous rampage through nearby businesses on River Road. With deadly accuracy, Unruh shot customers and proprietors randomly at a barber shop, a tailor shop, a shoe-repair shop and a pharmacy. Some luckless bystanders were gunned down in their cars while stopped at intersections. The youngest of Unruh's victims was just two years old. The toddler was killed as he looked out of an apartment window. When Unruh ran out of ammunition, he made his way back home and awaited his fate. Incredibly he spoke calmly, politely and amicably on the telephone to a local newspaper reporter while he awaited arrest. Unruh was shot in the leg by an armed citizen during his rampage but seemed oblivious to his wound. He was judged to be insane and thus not fit to stand trial under New Jersey law. He was held in a mental institution for more than 60 years before dying in 2009 at the age of 88. Hardly remorseful, in his last known interview Unruh said he would have happily killed thousands of people had he had the opportunity.
Tags: Howard  Unruh  mass  killer  NJ 
Added: 18th December 2018
Views: 485
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Posted By: Lava1964

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