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Gerry Rafferty Passes Today at the age of 63 Gerry Rafferty, best known for performing the 1970s hits "Baker Street" and "Stuck in the Middle With You," has died at the age of 63 after Battling an "undisclosed illness", The Guardian reports. Rafferty's family confirmed that he died peacefully at home this morning. In November 2010, Rafferty was admitted to a hospital in Bournemouth, Dorset, suffering from liver failure. His family was told that there was little chance of his survival, although after he was taken off life support, his condition began to improve. Rafferty died on 4 January 2011.
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Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 1172
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Tinker to Evers to Chance Back in the day when sports writing was at its gaudy peak, scribes often used poetry in their description of people and events. The most famous sports poem is likely this one penned by Franklin P. Adams: These are the saddest of possible words: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' This work was first published as 'That Double Play Again' in the July 12, 1910, New York Evening Mail. The Chicago Daily Tribune reprinted it as 'Gotham's Woe' on July 15, 1910. Three days later, on July 18, the New York Evening Mail republished it under the title by which it is best known today, 'Baseball's Sad Lexicon.' It described the double-play artistry of Chicago Cubs when the team was in its heyday in the first decade of the 20th century. (Yes, the Cubs actually had a heyday.) Second baseman Joe Tinker, shortstop Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance first played together in 1902. Although the poetic lament was accurate, the Cubs' famed trio never came close to leading the National League in double plays at any time. Nevertheless all three were inducted into the Hall of fame in 1946 largely because of Franklin Adams' doggerel. Based on sheer statistics, probably only Frank Chance deserves to be there. Although all three ballplayers are long dead, their double play prowess has been referenced in numerous literary works, movies, and TV shows as varied as Hogan's Heroes and The Brady Bunch.
Tags: baseball  Tinker  Evers  Chance  Chicago  Cubs 
Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 2014
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Posted By: Lava1964
Harry Truman Assassination Attempt An assassination attempt on President Harry Truman occurred on November 1, 1950. It was perpetrated by two Puerto Rican pro-independence activists, Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola. It occurred while Truman was residing at Blair House during extensive White House renovations. The attempt resulted in the deaths of White House police officer Leslie Coffelt, and Torresola. Truman was unharmed. Torresola walked up Pennsylvania Avenue from the west side while his partner, Oscar Collazo, walked up to Capital police officer Donald Birdzell on the steps of Blair House. Approaching Birdzell from behind, Collazo pulled out a handgun, pointed it at the officer's back, and pulled the trigger. Since he had failed to cock it, nothing happened. Collazo managed to fire the weapon just as Birdzell was turning to face him, striking the officer in his right knee. Secret Service agent Floyd Boring and White House police officer Joseph Davidson heard the shot and opened fire on Collazo. Collazo returned fire and soon found himself outgunned as the wounded Birdzell joined the shootout. Soon after, Collazo was struck by two rounds in the head and right arm, while other officers joined the gunfight. Torresola approached a guard booth at the west corner of Blair House where an officer, Private Leslie Coffelt, was sitting inside. Torresola quickly pivoted from left to right around the opening of the booth. Coffelt was taken completely by surprise. Torresola fired four shots from his Luger at close range. Three shots struck Coffelt in the chest and abdomen, a fourth went through his tunic. Coffelt slumped in his chair, mortally wounded. Torresola turned his attention to plainclothes White House policeman Joseph Downs. Downs, who had just chatted with Coffelt, proceeded down the walkway to the basement door at the west end of the Blair-Lee house when he heard shots. Downs noticed Torresola, but he was shot in the hip before he could draw his weapon. Downs turned back towards the house, and was shot twice more by Torresola, once in the back and once in the neck. Downs staggered to the basement door, opened it, slid in, and then slammed the door behind him, denying Torresola entry into Blair House. Torresola turned his attention to the shoot-out between his partner, Collazo, and several other law enforcement officers. Torresola saw wounded policeman Donald Birdzell aiming at Collazo from the south side of Pennsylvania Avenue. Torresola aimed and shot Birdzell in the left knee from a distance of approximately 40 feet. Now shot in both knees, Birdzell was effectively incapacitated. (He would later recover.) Soon after, the severely wounded Collazo was hit in the chest by a ricochet shot from Davidson and was incapacitated too. Torresola stood to the immediate left of Blair House steps while he reloaded. At the same time, Truman, who had been napping in his second-floor bedroom, was awoken by the gunfire. Truman went to his bedroom window, opened it, and looked outside. From where he stood reloading, Torresola was 31 feet away from that window. It is unknown whether either man saw the other. At the same time, the wounded Coffelt staggered out of his guard booth, leaned against it, and aimed his revolver at Torresola, who was approximately 30 feet away. Coffelt fired, hitting Torresola two inches above the ear, killing him instantly. Coffelt himself died four hours later. Officer Coffelt's widow, Cressie E. Coffelt, was asked by the President and the Secretary of State to go to Puerto Rico, where she received condolences from various Puerto Rican leaders and crowds. Mrs. Coffelt always absolved the island's people of blame for the acts of the two gunmen. A plaque at Blair House commemorates Coffelt's sacrifice and heroism. The day room for the U.S. Secret Service's Uniformed Division at Blair House is also named for Coffelt.
Tags: Harry  Truman  assassination  attempt 
Added: 21st January 2011
Views: 2395
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Bennett - Baseball Mascot A hunchback or dwarf was once considered by sports teams to bring good luck. Many professional baseball teams had such a mascot. Hunchbacks were considered particularly lucky. Many players rubbed the mascot's back before batting, believing a hit was sure to follow. Eddie Bennett was such an object of luck, but he also became much more to the teams he worked for. From the beginning of his life, Eddie Bennett seemed to catch bad breaks. A childhood accident left Eddie with a crippling back injury stunting his growth and leaving him hunchbacked and permanently child-sized. His life was further disadvantaged when both his parents perished in the 1918 influenza epidemic. Crippled and orphaned, things looked bleak for the young kid from Flatbush. Eddie was a big baseball fan and frequently hung around the Polo Grounds. Happy Felsch of the Chicago White Sox took notice of the boy. Impressed by his cheery demeanor, the Sox adopted Eddie as their good luck charm. Eddie travelled with the team and they won the 1919 AL pennant. Eddie returned to Brooklyn for the 1920 season--and Brooklyn won the NL pennant that year. During the 1920 World Series, after winning two out of three games at home, the team left Eddie behind when they went on the road to play Cleveland. Without their lucky charm they promptly lost four straight games and the best-of-nine series. Eddie, dejected and offended, left the team in disgust. In 1921 Eddie latched onto the New York Yankees. Although still a good luck charm, Eddie established himself as a true professional batboy. He not only performed the typical duties of batboy, he also handled other tasks, enabling the players to focus on the game. He was a paid employee of the Yankees and took his job very seriously. Eddie ran errands for the players, procured their favorite foods, and became their confidant. Eddie was privy to every rumor and scandal regarding the Yankees during the Roaring Twenties but he kept his mouth shut. When Urban Shocker was suffering from serious heart problems late in his career, he roomed with Eddie. He honored the pitcher's wishes and kept Shocker's health issues from his teammates. Babe Ruth in particular became close to Eddie. Ruth and Bennett would enter the field early in batting practice and perform a comical warmup show. The much larger Ruth would continually throw the ball out of Eddie's reach, eventually backing him up to the backstop. Not one Ruthian homerun went by without Eddie being the first to shake his hand upon touching home plate. If you look at any team picture from 1921 to 1932, there is Eddie, front and center with a big wide grin on his face, the envy of every boy in America. In the 12 seasons Eddie was with the Yankees, they won seven AL pennants and four World Series. All this changed early in 1932 when Ediie was hit by a taxicab, breaking his leg. Due to his other health problems the injury healed slowly. By the end of the year it was clear that Eddie's fragile health was failing. Unable to perform his duties with the Yankees, he was nevertheless financially supported by team owner Jacob Ruppert for his past services to his club. But not being around the team anymore and the severe pain he suffered daily because of the accident took its toll on Eddie. He began drinking heavily. He passed away in 1935 after a three-week bender, surrounded in his room by mounds of priceless memorabilia from his years as baseball's most famous batboy.
Tags: baseball  mascot  Eddie  Bennett  Yankees  hunchback 
Added: 22nd February 2011
Views: 1749
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Posted By: Lava1964
Look Magazine Look was a hugely popular general-interest magazine that focused more on photography than articles. Published in Des Moines, Iowa, it began in February 1937 and was intended to be a monthly periodical. Within weeks, more than a million copies were bought of each issue, and it became a bi-weekly. By 1948 it sold 2.9 million copies per issue. Circulation reached 3.7 million in 1954, and peaked at 7.75 million in 1969. Its advertising revenue peaked in 1966 at $80 million. Of the leading general-interest, large-format magazines, Look had a circulation second only to Life and ahead of The Saturday Evening Post, which closed in 1969, and Collier's, which folded in 1956. Look was published under various company names: Look, Inc. (193745), Cowles Magazines (194665), and Cowles Communications, Inc. (196571). Its New York editorial offices were located in the architecturally distinctive 488 Madison Avenue, dubbed the Look Building, now on the National Register of Historic Places. Beginning in 1963, Norman Rockwell, after closing his career with the Saturday Evening Post, began making illustrations for Look. Look ceased publication with its issue of October 19, 1971, the victim of a $5 million loss in revenues in 1970 (with television cutting deeply into its advertising revenues), a slack economy and rising postal rates. Circulation was still at 6.5 million when it closed.
Tags: Look  magazine  photography 
Added: 9th April 2011
Views: 1200
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rush - Closer to the Heart Tags: Rush  -  Closer  to  the  Heart,  70s,  70s  Music,  oldies,  reminisce,   
Added: 11th April 2011
Views: 1440
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Posted By: pfc
Bill Gallo Passes at age 88 Bill Gallo, a cartoonist and columnist for the New York Daily News, whose playful characters included that of New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner as General Von Steingrabber, has died. He was 88. Gallo, who worked for the paper for seven decades, died Tuesday from complications of pneumonia at White Plains Hospital, the News reported Tuesday. "His death closed a chapter in the storied history of The News," said Daily News Chairman and publisher Mortimer Zuckerman told the paper. "The passing of our great cartoonist, colleague and friend Bill Gallo marks the end of an era." Gallo profiled in ink and sometimes in words most of the great sports figures of the past century, going back to Jack Dempsey, Man O' War, Jesse Owens and Dizzy Dean and his St. Louis Cardinals' Gas House Gang. The latter were his secret heroes, he told The Associated Press in an interview in 2000, secret because he devoted a lifetime at a drawing bo ard to amusing New York's rabidly loyal sports fans.
Tags: Bill  Gallo,  New  York  Daily  News,  Mortimer  Zuckerman,  New  York  Mets,  Basement  Bertha 
Added: 12th May 2011
Views: 1191
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Posted By: Old Fart
North Korean Soccer Team Punished For Losing The North Korean soccer team qualified for the 2010 World Cup tournament in South Africa. Their chances of success were considered slim. In fact North Korean television, fearing an embarrassment, planned no coverage of the team's games. They lost their first match to mighty Brazil by a close 2-1 score. With cause for optimism, arrangements were made for the team's second game to be broadcast in North Korea. To the chagrin of the communist regime, Portugal routed the North Koreans 7-0. As soon as the score reached 2-0, the signal was yanked off the air. In their final game, Ivory Coast beat North Korea 3-0. When the players returned home, they were publicly shamed: the team and its manager were forced onto a stage at the People's Palace of Culture in front of 400 government officials, students, and journalists. According to reports, the athletes were subjected to a six-hour barrage of criticism for their poor performances that was led by a TV commentator and sports minister Pak Myong-chol. The players were asked to step up in turn and publicly criticize manager Kim Jong-hun, who had apparently been singled out for punishment. He was forced into a construction job because, it is thought, his team's failure was seen as a personal betrayal of Kim Jong-un, the son of leader Kim Jong-il.
Tags: World  Cup  soccer  North  Korea 
Added: 13th May 2011
Views: 2528
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Posted By: Lava1964
Teddy Pendergrass-Close the Door Tags: Teddy  Pendergrass-Close  the  Door,  1979,  70s,  soul,  rhythmn  and  blues,  R&B 
Added: 30th July 2011
Views: 1138
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Posted By: Cathy
Holmes and Yo-Yo - Sitcom Flop 1976 Holmes & Yo-Yo was a disastrous, far-fetched sitcom that aired on ABC for 13 episodes during the 1976-1977 season. The series followed luckless Detective Alexander Holmes (whose partners always seem to get killed in the line of duty) and his new android partner Yo-Yo, on their adventures and misadventures. Meanwhile Holmes taught Yo-Yo how to be human while trying to keep his quirky partner's true nature a secret. The show was produced by Leonard Stern, a former staff writer for Get Smart--which featured an android character named Hymie who was a prototype for Yo-Yo. Richard B. Shull starred as Detective Holmes. John Schuck starred as his partner Gregory "Yo-Yo" Yoyonivich. Co-stars were Andrea Howard and Bruce Kirby. Jay Leno appeared in the pilot as a gas station attendant! The pilot episode introduced Detective Holmes as a down-on-his-luck veteran cop who constantly injures his partners. The department gives him a new partner, Gregory Yoyonivich. Yo-Yo, as he likes to be called, is good-natured, if a bit clumsy, and also surprisingly strong. During one of their first calls, Yo-Yo is shot and Holmes discovers his new partner is an android--a sophisticated new crime-fighting machine designed by the police department as their secret weapon on crime. "You're not a person!" is Holmes' stunned response. Besides super-strength, Yo-Yo's other abilities were speed reading, and the ability to analyze clues at the scene. Yo-Yo had a built-in Polaroid camera: Each time his nose was pressed, a Polaroid photograph of his view would be taken and ejected from his shirt pocket. Yo-Yo's control panel was built into his chest, which could be opened by pulling his tie. The level of Yo-Yo's batteries was critical, because if they ran down his memory and, effectively, his being would be erased. In one episode his batteries came very close to running down completely, and he was charged by being pushed against an electric fence with his arms extended. Yo-Yo weighed 427 pounds, and his heavy build could absorb the shock of a bomb. Much comedy was derived from Yo-Yo's constant malfunctions. Some of his common problems included uncontrollably spinning head over heels when near an electric garage door that was opening or closing; bullets causing him to break out dancing; magnets flying at him; picking up radio signals from Sweden; and repeating "Bunco Squad, Bunco Squad, Bunco Squad" over and over when his circuits blew. Another running gag involved Yo-Yo's ability to read an entire book by simply fanning its pages; his invariable comment after doing so: "I enjoyed it!" The show premiered in September 1976 and was axed before Christmas.
Tags: Holmes  and  Yo-Yo  sitcom  ABC  flop 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 2117
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Posted By: Lava1964

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