Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Men Are Better Than Women ok, the ad for Drummond Climbing Sweaters reads: Men are better than Women! Indoors, women are useful-even plesant. On a mountain they are somthing of a drag. So don't go hauing them up a cliff just to show off your Drummond climbing sweater . . . ok!!! we'll push u off first!
Tags: ad  Drummond  climbing  sweaters 
Added: 3rd November 2007
Views: 3251
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Hillsborough Disaster - 1989 One of the world's most senseless sporting disasters took place on Saturday, April 15, 1989 at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, England. That afternoon 96 soccer fans were crushed to death before and during the early minutes of an FA Cup semifinal between Liverpool FC and Nottingham Forest FC. The stadium was a neutral site, but Liverpool had thousands more fans than Nottingham Forest who sought tickets. As is the custom, the two teams' fans were segregated. The Liverpool supporters were generally assigned standing-room tickets on the south terraces--enclosures surrounded by security fences. With the Liverpool terraces already dangerously overcrowded, the situation became exponentially worse when the police outside the stadium, fearing trouble, ordered an exit gate to be opened and 2,000 more fans rushed into the enclosures bypassing the turnstiles. The crush of the crowd caused fans already inside to be pushed and squeezed against the heavy metal fences and die of suffocation. Despite the constant pleas from fans for the police to open security gates to alleviate the pressure, the police on the other side of the fences did nothing. Some fans tried to escape by climbing into an upper deck. Others tried to scale the security fences. About six minutes into the match, the fans in the overcrowded terraces spilled over and through the fences causing the game to be stopped. Most of the fatalities died on the pitch without ever getting to a hospital. A coroner's report suggested that perhaps 40 of the fatalities could have been prevented with quick medical attention. Yet only two ambulances ever entered the stadium while others were stuck in a bottleneck outside the venue. Even with injured and dying fans being brought onto the pitch, most police officers were inexplicably more concerned with preventing rival Forest supporters from entering the field than assisting the injured. Initial reports wrongly blamed drunken and unruly fans for the catastrophe while exonerating the police's actions and inactions. Wildly inaccurate stories about fans pickpocketing the dead and interfering with rescue efforts were published in The Sun tabloid--a newspaper which is largely boycotted in Liverpool to this day. Later investigations indicated that a whitewash of the incident was orchestrated by the police, and rightly placed the blame on a paucity of law enforcement outside the stadium and a lack of police action when the situation on the terraces became dangerous. The ages of those killed ranged from 10 to 72. Eighty-nine of the 96 were males. One 10-year-old who died was the cousin of Steven Gerrard, who would later become Liverpool's captain. Terraces disappeared from most large British soccer venues shortly thereafter.
Tags: Hillsborough  disaster  England  soccer   
Added: 12th July 2014
Views: 2248
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5129
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Remains of George Mallory Found - 1999 Seventy-Five years after British mountaineer George Mallory vanished in June 1924 in his attempt to be the first man to scale Mount Everest, an expedition from National Geographic was organized to try to find his remains--along with those of his climbing colleague Andrew Irvine. The two were last seen alive about 800 meters from the summit. In 1979 a Chinese mountaineer reported to a Japanese climber that he had come across the remains of "an Englishman" during an ascent in 1975. The Chinese climber was killed in an avalanche the following day before he could give precise directions to the corpse. Going on the general location the Chinese climber had provided, the 1999 expedition covered a search area about the size of a dozen football fields. Sure enough, on May 1, 1999, Mallory's mummified corpse, sun bleached to an alabaster white, was discovered face down and fused to the mountain scree by American searcher Conrad Anker. ID tags on the clothing quickly confirmed the body was indeed Mallory's. Found in Mallory's possession was a letter from his brother and an unpaid bill Mallory owed to a London clothing shop. Mallory had several broken bones and a punctured skull, leading to speculation that he had severely injured himself in a sudden, violent fall and likely froze to death in a helpless state in a matter of minutes. Whether Mallory made it to Everest's summit or not is a matter of heated debate. Irvine's body has yet to be found. Warning: The clip is a little bit gruesome.
Tags: mountaineering  George  Mallory  corpse  discovery 
Added: 26th October 2014
Views: 1050
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Harold Lloyd Bomb Mishap - 1919 On August 24, 1919, ascending silent movie comedian Harold Lloyd arrived at Pathe Studios to begin a publicity campaign to celebrate his new contract. He was posing for some publicity stills--unaware that such a seemingly benign activity was about to dramatically change his life. In one posed shot Lloyd was supposed to light a prop bomb with a cigarette dangling from his mouth. (The image supposedly played up Lloyd's typical devil-may-care attitude in his films.) Unbeknownst to anyone in the studio, some actual bombs from another film--which had been rejected for being too dangerous--had been placed in a box among some dummy bombs. The photographer innocently handed Lloyd one of the live bombs. When the fuse was lit, Lloyd sensed something was mildly wrong because it produced excessive smoke that would surely ruin any photographs. Just as Lloyd discarded the bomb on a nearby table, it exploded. Miraculously Lloyd was not killed as the blast ripped open a a 16-foot swath in the room. Nevertheless, Lloyd suffered numerous facial injuries and temporarily lost his eyesight. Only when extreme pain set in did Lloyd become aware that his right thumb and forefinger had been severed. He spent six weeks in a hospital recovering. He was overwhelmed by the number of fan letters which he said helped him overcome his depression about the accident. In all his subsequent films Lloyd wore a special prosthetic device concealed within a white glove to make it look like his right hand was absolutely normal. Lloyd did not want to dwell on his injury as he did not want moviegoers to watch his films due to pity. Lloyd continued to engage in very active physical comedy routines despite the handicap. His famous building-climbing scene in Safety Last occurred after the bomb accident--making it all the more incredible. Some years ago I posted Lloyd's 1953 mystery guest appearance on What's My Line. His deformed hand can clearly be seen when he shakes hands with the WML panelists as he departs.
Tags: Harold  Lloyd  bomb  injury  hand 
Added: 20th April 2015
Views: 2509
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lucy and the Hammock From a 1959 episode of The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour titled Lucy Goes To Alaska, Lucy has more than her share of trouble climbing into a hammock. Keep in mind that Lucy was 48 years old in 1959. Those violent tumbles from the hammock must have hurt!
Tags: Lucy  hammock  Lucy-Desi  Comedy  Hour 
Added: 27th April 2016
Views: 1404
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Gordon Griffith - First Movie Tarzan Most film history sources will list Elmo Lincoln as the first actor to play Tarzan on screen (in the 1918 silent film Tarzan of the Apes). That's not entirely true. In that same silent film, a 10-year-old boy named Gordon Griffith played the young Tarzan well before Lincoln appeared on the screen. It was a challenging role for the boy actor. Griffith was required to do his own climbing and acrobatic stunts and interact with live chimpanzees--which he did excellently. True to the Edgar Rice Burroughs book, Tarzan wore no clothes as a youth, so most of Griffith's scenes were shot with him totally nude. There was no national film code in 1918, but some scenes that showed too much of Griffith from the front were cut by local censors, including those in Chicago. Thus the public domain prints of the movie vary in length and in the amount of time Griffith was on the screen. Griffith, who like Tarzan lost both his parents at a young age, spent most of his life in the movie industry. He died in 1958 of a heart attack at the age of 51.
Tags: first  film  Tarzan  Gordon  Griffith 
Added: 20th November 2017
Views: 280
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random