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Van Cliburn - Moscow 1958 A truly historic classical music performance: In 1958, at the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union hosted an international Tchaikovsky compeition for pianists. It was supposed to showcase the superiority of Soviet culture. To the surprise of the hosts, a 23-year-old Texan named Van Cliburn emerged as the superstar of the event. Cliburn mesmerized the crowds, the television audience, and the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra with his technical and artistic brilliance. Here is the last four minutes of Cliburn's final performance of the event--Rachmaninoff's 3rd Concerto. Look at the reaction from the audience and the orchestra members. The applause lasted for about eight minutes. Everyone knew who the outstanding pianist of the competition was! This created quite a dilemma for the organizers: a Soviet citizen was expected to win--not an American. Soviet Premier Nikita Khruschev was hastily telephoned to make the final decision. To his credit Khruschev settled the matter quickly and fairly: "Was he the best? Yes? Then give him the prize!" Cliburn became a beloved figure in Russia until his death in 2013.
Tags: Van  Cliburn  pianist  1958  Tchaikovsky  competition  Moscow 
Added: 21st January 2014
Views: 1873
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mason Williams   Classical Gas LOL this is a little complicated. The song was a hit in 1968 so that's where I posted it. The Smother Brothers Show aired until 1969. This aired in 1988 when the Writers Guild went on strike so The Smothers Brothers were briefly back on the air and when this clip was actually aired!
Tags: Mason  Williams  Classical  Gas 
Added: 2nd September 2007
Views: 2406
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Posted By: Freckles
Eric Clapton Live            LAYLA The story behind the song goes something like this. In 1966, George Harrison married Pattie Boyd, a model he met during the filming of A Hard Day's Night. During the late 1960s, Clapton and Harrison became good friends. Clapton contributed guitar work on Harrison's song "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" on The Beatles' White Album but remained uncredited, and Harrison played guitar pseudonymously on Cream's "Badge" from Goodbye. However, trouble was brewing for Clapton. Besides his difficulty in keeping a band together and his growing heroin addiction, when Boyd came to him for aid during marital troubles, Clapton fell desperately in love with her. The title, "Layla", was inspired by the Persian love story, The Story of Layla, by the Persian classical poet Nezami. When he wrote "Layla", Clapton had recently been given a copy of the story by a friend who was in the process of converting to Islam. Nezami's tale, about a moon-princess who was married off by her father to someone other than the man who was desperately in love with her, resulting in his madness, struck a deep chord with Clapton. Boyd divorced Harrison in 1977 and married Clapton in 1979. Harrison was not bitter about the divorce and attended Clapton's wedding with Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney. During their relationship, Clapton wrote another love ballad for her, "Wonderful Tonight." Clapton and Boyd divorced in 1989 after several years of separation.
Tags: eric  clapton  layla    patty  boyd 
Added: 15th October 2007
Views: 3043
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Posted By: Naomi
Neil Sedaka on Ive Got a Secret Here's an interesting clip. Pop singer Neil Sedaka appears on I've Got a Secret in 1965. His secret? He's going to the Soviet Union to perform as a classical pianist. Apparently he never got there. The Russians found out Sedaka was a rock and roll idol and barred him from entering the country! What a paranoid lot they were!
Tags: Neil  Sedaka  Ive  Got  a  Secret 
Added: 7th March 2009
Views: 965
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Posted By: Lava1964
Emerson Lake and Palmer Fanfare For the Common Man One of American composer Aaron Copland's most popular and recognized pieces of classical music in the 20th century.Written in 1942 for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra under conductor Eugene Goossens.Three verses eighty plus;Not too shabby.
Tags: Emerson  Lake  &  Palmer  -  Fanfare  For  the  Common  Man 
Added: 1st January 2008
Views: 1629
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Posted By: tommy7
Robert DeNiro  An Actors Actor This is a short, and very brief summary of some of DeNiro's greatest and most classical works. It's by no means a full representation of his work, as it is only four minutes long , but I feel these scenes best displayed his power, intensity, and range of abilities. (PG)
Tags: robert  deniro  the  godfather  II  deer  hunter  casino  taxi  driver  great  actors 
Added: 19th January 2008
Views: 1401
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Posted By: Naomi
Distant Drums As a kid my Gran always seem to play Scottish country dance and classical music. Imagine my surpise when one day I heard this coming from her record player. Made me love the music of Jim Reeves to this day.
Tags: Jim  Reeves  Distant  Drums 
Added: 27th April 2008
Views: 1203
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Posted By: donmac101
MASON WILLIAMS CLASSICAL GAS Here ya go BadWX!
Tags: MASON  WILLIAMS  CLASSICAL  GAS 
Added: 13th June 2008
Views: 1362
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Posted By: pfc
Les Paul and Mary Ford How High the Moon Not only did Les Paul invent the electric guitar but also "over sampling" an editing trick that made the sound even bigger.
Tags: les    paul    mary    ford    how    high    the    moon    alternative    blues    classical    country    electronic    folk    hip-hop    indie    jazz    world    music    unsigned    soul    rock    rap    r&b    pop    religious     
Added: 15th August 2009
Views: 9469
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Posted By: Old Fart
1896 Five-Dollar Silver Certificate Controversy A new series of $1, $2 and $5 banknotes were printed by the U.S. government in 1896. Known to collectors as the "educational series," the banknotes used classical art motifs to promote advancements in science. For example, the $5 silver certificate's design (shown below) highlighted the new importance that electricity brought to modern society. However, the naked breasts on the female figures sent some prudish folks into a tizzy. Some merchants and bankers in Boston considered the $5 bills to be obscene and refused to accept them--thus creating the term 'banned in Boston.' Despite the controversy, many banknote collectors consider the 1896 series to be the most beautiful ever produced by the U.S. government.
Tags: 1896  banknotes  numismatics  controversy 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 2915
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Posted By: Lava1964

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