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John Banner Here's a face that fans of 1960s TV can't forget: John Banner who played the bumbling and thoroughly lovable Sgt. Hans Schultz on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971. Apart from his steady role on Hogan's Heroes, the Austrian-born Banner made over 70 other television appearances between 1950 and 1972, including roles on Mister Ed, The Lucy Show, Perry Mason, The Partridge Family, The Untouchables, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. In a 1954 episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Banner and Werner Klemperer--who would later be cast as Colonel Klink in Hogan's Heroes--both had roles. Banner, a Jew, was on tour with an acting troupe in Switzerland when the Nazis occupied Austria in 1938. Banner opted to emigrate to the United States and continue his acting career there. By the 1960s, the once lean Banner's weight had increased to 280 pounds. This helped gain him the part of the kindly inept German POW camp guard in Hogan's Heroes. The gentle Banner was loved not only by the viewers, but by the show's other cast members too. Banner defended his character, telling TV Guide in 1967: 'Schultz is not a Nazi. I see Schultz as the representative of some kind of goodness in any generation.' After Hogan's Heroes was cancelled in 1971, Banner starred as the inept gangster Uncle Latzi in the short-lived television sitcom, The Chicago Teddy Bears. His last acting appearance was in the March 7, 1972 episode of The Partridge Family. He then retired to his native Vienna. There he died suddenly of an aneurysm on his 63rd birthday on January 28, 1973.
Tags: TV  John  Banner  Hogan 
Added: 29th January 2011
Views: 1905
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chicago - Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is Tags: Chicago  -  Does  Anybody  Really  Know  What  Time  It  Is  70s  1970s,  music,  great  music,  classic 
Added: 14th March 2011
Views: 1583
Rating:
Posted By: Music Maiden
Eddie Bennett - Baseball Mascot A hunchback or dwarf was once considered by sports teams to bring good luck. Many professional baseball teams had such a mascot. Hunchbacks were considered particularly lucky. Many players rubbed the mascot's back before batting, believing a hit was sure to follow. Eddie Bennett was such an object of luck, but he also became much more to the teams he worked for. From the beginning of his life, Eddie Bennett seemed to catch bad breaks. A childhood accident left Eddie with a crippling back injury stunting his growth and leaving him hunchbacked and permanently child-sized. His life was further disadvantaged when both his parents perished in the 1918 influenza epidemic. Crippled and orphaned, things looked bleak for the young kid from Flatbush. Eddie was a big baseball fan and frequently hung around the Polo Grounds. Happy Felsch of the Chicago White Sox took notice of the boy. Impressed by his cheery demeanor, the Sox adopted Eddie as their good luck charm. Eddie travelled with the team and they won the 1919 AL pennant. Eddie returned to Brooklyn for the 1920 season--and Brooklyn won the NL pennant that year. During the 1920 World Series, after winning two out of three games at home, the team left Eddie behind when they went on the road to play Cleveland. Without their lucky charm they promptly lost four straight games and the best-of-nine series. Eddie, dejected and offended, left the team in disgust. In 1921 Eddie latched onto the New York Yankees. Although still a good luck charm, Eddie established himself as a true professional batboy. He not only performed the typical duties of batboy, he also handled other tasks, enabling the players to focus on the game. He was a paid employee of the Yankees and took his job very seriously. Eddie ran errands for the players, procured their favorite foods, and became their confidant. Eddie was privy to every rumor and scandal regarding the Yankees during the Roaring Twenties but he kept his mouth shut. When Urban Shocker was suffering from serious heart problems late in his career, he roomed with Eddie. He honored the pitcher's wishes and kept Shocker's health issues from his teammates. Babe Ruth in particular became close to Eddie. Ruth and Bennett would enter the field early in batting practice and perform a comical warmup show. The much larger Ruth would continually throw the ball out of Eddie's reach, eventually backing him up to the backstop. Not one Ruthian homerun went by without Eddie being the first to shake his hand upon touching home plate. If you look at any team picture from 1921 to 1932, there is Eddie, front and center with a big wide grin on his face, the envy of every boy in America. In the 12 seasons Eddie was with the Yankees, they won seven AL pennants and four World Series. All this changed early in 1932 when Ediie was hit by a taxicab, breaking his leg. Due to his other health problems the injury healed slowly. By the end of the year it was clear that Eddie's fragile health was failing. Unable to perform his duties with the Yankees, he was nevertheless financially supported by team owner Jacob Ruppert for his past services to his club. But not being around the team anymore and the severe pain he suffered daily because of the accident took its toll on Eddie. He began drinking heavily. He passed away in 1935 after a three-week bender, surrounded in his room by mounds of priceless memorabilia from his years as baseball's most famous batboy.
Tags: baseball  mascot  Eddie  Bennett  Yankees  hunchback 
Added: 22nd February 2011
Views: 1749
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1928-29 Chicago Blackhawks The 1928-29 Chicago Blackhawks may have been the most offensively inept team ever to play in the National Hockey League. The Blackhawks managed to score just 33 goals all season in a 44-game schedule--for an average of 0.75 goals per game. At one point in their dismal 1928-29 season, the Hawks embarrassingly suffered eight consecutive shutouts. Six of them occurred at home.
Tags: shutout  NHL  Chicago  Blackhawks 
Added: 8th March 2011
Views: 1566
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pay Toilets The first pay toilet in the United States was installed in 1910 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Pay toilets were prevalent in restaurants and other public buildings until the mid-1970s. However, a campaign by the Committee to End Pay Toilets In America (CEPTIA) resulted in laws prohibiting them in cities and states--legislation that was widely applauded by the public. In 1973, Chicago became the first American city to enact a pay-toilet ban. At the time, according to the Wall Street Journal, there were at least 50,000 units in America, mostly made by the Nik-O-Lok Company. CEPTIA was successful over the next few years in obtaining bans in New York, New Jersey, Minnesota, California, Florida and Ohio. Lobbying was successful in other states as well, and by decade's end, pay toilets were greatly reduced in America. However, they are surprisingly still in use in some places. Many people would be shocked to learn that pay toilets are once again legal as the CEPTIA-inspired bans from the 1970s have been repealed in many jurisdictions.
Tags: pay  toilets   
Added: 9th April 2011
Views: 6325
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Posted By: Lava1964
North American Soccer League The North American Soccer League was supposed to be the 'next big thing' in sports. It lasted 17 seasons but it failed to dislodge the traditional team sports from their longtime perch as fan favorites. The league began in 1968 with the merger of two small pro leagues and lasted until 1984. At the peak of the NASL's popularity in the late 1970s, it had 24 teams. The New York Cosmos (who featured Pele and Franz Beckenbauer on their roster) sometimes drew 70,000 fans to Giants Stadium. However, the league average never exceeded 15,000 fans per game and some teams struggled to draw 5,000. By its last season, the NASL had dwindled to nine teams. By the time the final NASL game was played between the Chicago Sting and Toronto Blizzard, only three teams were solvent. To Europeans, the NASL was perceived as soccer's version of an elephants' graveyard where players long past their primes could extend their careers for sizable money. The Euro stars, despite their diminishing skills, accounted for large chunks of teams' payrolls that could have been better spent fostering North American talent. Traditionalists were also put off by the NASL's gimmicks to Americanize the sport: a liberalized offside rule, game clocks that counted downward instead of upward, penalty shootouts to break ties, and a crazy points system that rewarded goals scored as well as wins. In the end, the NASL managed to alienate traditional soccer fans while failing to attract new ones.
Tags: NASL  soccer 
Added: 12th April 2011
Views: 1212
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Beast of Chicago - 19th Century Serial Killer Outwardly mild H.H. Holmes was actually a brutal and ruthless nineteenth-century serial killer who rightfully earned the moniker 'The Beast of Chicago.' From 1888 to 1894 Holmes killed a minimum of 27 victims and perhaps more than 200. In 1886 Holmes began working at a drugstore at the corner of South Wallace and West 63rd Street in Chicago. He eventually became the proprietor after the former owner mysteriously disappeared. The drugstore did quite well, and Holmes — who became known as Dr. Holmes — used the profits to build himself a three-story tall, city-block long, home across the street. It was Holmes' 'murder castle.'--equipped with acid vats, trap doors, secret entrances, and gas chambers. Holmes lured people to the castle, killed them, and sold their skeletons to medical professionals. He was eventually hanged, but not before being convicted of 27 murders, and suspected of at least 173 more. Erik Larson’s award-winning 2003 book, The Devil in the White City, told Holmes’ twisted tale so well that Leonardo DiCaprio purchased the rights to the film; he’s expected to play Holmes.
Tags: murderer  Holmes  Chicago 
Added: 15th June 2011
Views: 2285
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
N.Y. Yankees Fire Red Barber - 1966 Red Barber was one of the great baseball broadcasters of all time. He began as the radio voice of the Cincinnati Reds in 1934. He became the Brooklyn Dodgers' lead broadcaster in 1939 and held that position until 1953 when he fell into disfavor with Dodger management over salary demands. The New York Yankees quickly hired Barber to work alongside Mel Allen beginning in 1954. The two men had contrasting styles but they meshed well together. Barber was the restrained southern gentleman while Allen was exuberant and bombastic. Barber's tenure with the Yankees ended suddenly at the end of the 1966 season--largely because he had the courage to report the truth. The Yankees, owned by CBS at the time, were a last-place team in 1966. During a home game on Thursday, September 22, only 413 fans were scattered around the cavernous ballpark to watch the Yankees play the visiting Chicago White Sox in a makeup game. The TV cameramen were under strict instructions from CBS media relations not to follow foul balls into the sea of empty seats. Barber, though, took it upon himself to paint the scene with words. "I don't know what the paid attendance is today," he said, "but whatever it is, it is the smallest crowd in the history of Yankee Stadium...and this crowd is the story, not the game." That game was the first for CBS executive Mike Burke as team president. A week later, Barber was invited to a breakfast meeting where Burke abruptly told him that his contract wouldn't be renewed for 1967. Barber was so stunned by the news that he rose from the table and left the restaurant without speaking. Barber had fully expected Burke to reaffirm his importance to a rebuilding team. Barber retired from sports broadcasting altogether. He died in 1992 at age 84.
Tags: Red  Barber  baseball  Yankees  fired  broadcaster 
Added: 21st September 2011
Views: 3024
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Posted By: Lava1964
Elizabeth Ann Roberts 16-year-old Playboy Playmate Elizabeth Ann Roberts, Playboy magazine's Playmate of the Month for January 1958, looked like a high school student--because she was! Born in August 1941, the pretty 16-year-old showed up for her photo shoot with a note signed by her mother (who actually accompanied Elizabeth!). Mom's note gave the okay for her daughter to pose for Playboy and also attested that Elizabeth was not a minor. Roberts appeared in a pictorial salaciously titled "Schoolmate Playmate." Her elegant but very youthful appearance prompted an investigation. Charges were laid in Chicago against both Playboy impresario Hugh Hefner and Elizabeth's mother for "contributing to the delinquency of a minor." The charge against Hefner was later dropped when it could not be proved that Hefner knew Roberts' real age. Had the case proceeded to court, Hefner was prepared to argue that the girl who posed nude for the famous 1912 painting September Morn was only 15. Roberts later worked as a bunny in Chicago's Playboy Club. There have been at least seven Playboy Playmates of the Month who were under 18 years of age. Almost all appeared before 1967 when previously vague laws pertaining to modelling for art, erotica, and pornography were clarified and tightened. One exception was the spectacularly well endowed Cynthia Myers (Playmate from December 1968): She was only 17 when she posed, but she had turned 18 by the time her photos were published. It took until 1984 for Playboy to officially institute a minimum age of 18 for its models.
Tags: Elizabeth  Ann  Roberts  Playboy  Playmate  underage 
Added: 20th September 2011
Views: 32024
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Posted By: Lava1964
1932 NFL Championship Game One of the most important games in the history of the National Football League was the 1932 NFL Championship Game. It provided many firsts: Most significantly it was the NFL's first championship game--and it was the first NFL game to be played indoors. Prior to 1933 there was no official league championship game. The league title went to the team with the best record--which was often disputed because teams did not play anything resembling a balanced schedule. In 1932, both the Chicago Bears and Portsmouth (OH) Spartans had six wins and a loss. By rule, tie games were ignored in the standings. Portsmouth had four ties and the Bears had six! During the regular season, both games between the Bears and Spartans had ended in ties. With the NFL's blessings, the Bears and Spartans agreed to play a one-game tie-breaker at Chicago's Wrigley Field on December 18. However, a forecast of a blizzard and minus-40-degree temperatures prompted the game to be moved indoors to Chicago Stadium, an arena more suited for hockey than football. Dirt from a recent circus was spread on the arena's concrete floor to form somethin akin to a regular gridiron. The cozy confines forced some playing rules to be revised. Because there were only 80 yards between the goal lines, as soon as a team advanced the ball beyond midfield, it was moved back 20 yards! The goalposts were moved from the endline to the goal line (where they stayed until 1974). Also, because the field was ten yards narrower than usual, before every play from scrimmage the ball was placed between hashmarks ten yards from the sideline. Chicago won the game 9-0, all their points coming in the fourth quarter on a controversial forward-pass touchdown and a safety. (The touchdown play caused the NFL's passing rules to be modernized the following season.) Not long afterward the Spartans moved to Detroit and became the Lions. The game was a huge success and inspired the NFL to split itself into two divisions and hold an annual championship game between the divisional champs. That system determined the NFL champion each year until the Super Bowl era began in 1966.
Tags: football  NFL  1932  Championship 
Added: 14th January 2012
Views: 2741
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Posted By: Lava1964

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