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1972 Fischer Spassky World Chess Championship Chess was front page news and on the cover of Time Magazine in the summer of 1972 when American Bobby Fischer challenged world champion Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union. Fischer, 29, had been prominent on the chess scene since 1958 when he won the U.S. championship just before he turned 15. The Soviet Union had dominated international chess for 25 years, but Spassky was bamboozled by Fischer's unpredictable openings. Fischer clinched the 24-game match, held in Reykjavik, Iceland, after 21 games with a record of seven wins, three losses, and eleven draws. Fischer's victory generated tremendous interest in the game in the United States. Known as the 'Fischer Boom,' membership numbers in the U.S. Chess Federation reached their peak in the following two years. The eccentric Fischer never defended his title. He opted to resign as world champion in 1974 when not all of his 64 conditions to defend against Anatoly Karpov were accepted by chess' governing body. Since then Fischer has been a recluse. He did make an appearance in 1992 to play his old rival Spassky in a specially arranged match in Yugoslavia. (This violated UN sanctions against Yugoslavia at the time.) Fischer won the match and proclaimed he was still the legitimate world champion. Despite having Jewish ancestry, Fischer is an anti-Semite and a passionate Holocaust denier. Fischer called a Manila talk-radio station to applaud the 9/11 terrorist attacks in a profanity-filled rant. Fischer now lives in Iceland where he was granted citizenship.
Tags: Bobby  Fischer  Boris  Spassky  chess 
Added: 12th December 2007
Views: 1320
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bobby Fischer on Ive Got A Secret Bobby Fischer was the United States chess champion at age 15 when he appeared on I've Got A secret in 1958. He was sane and likable then.
Tags: Bobby  Fischer 
Added: 16th February 2008
Views: 1068
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rock and Roll- the early days - Chuck Berry Tags: chuck    berry    maybellene    chess    phil    leonard    chicago    muddy    waters    st.    louis    johnnie    johnson   
Added: 22nd May 2008
Views: 1206
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Posted By: Cliffy
Chuck E Chesse s commercial Tags: Chuck  E  Chesse 
Added: 12th June 2008
Views: 800
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Posted By: rickfmdj
Chessboxing Invented - 2003 Yes, this is real! Chessboxing is a rapidly growing sport, most popular in Europe, that combines the brain power of chess and the physical violence of boxing. Invented in 2003, a chessboxing match begins with two minutes of chess, followed by two minutes of boxing, and then back to chess, then boxing, and so forth. A match can last up to 11 rounds. It ends with either a checkmate or a knockout.
Tags: chessboxing 
Added: 25th April 2010
Views: 1074
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Posted By: Lava1964
Deep Blue Beats G. Kasparov in Chess February 10, 1997
Tags: Deep  Blue  beat  G.  Kasparov  Chess  IBM  computers  intelligence  man  made 
Added: 10th February 2015
Views: 473
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Posted By: Steve
Bobby Fischer and Bob Hope Shortly after Bobby Fischer's famous victory over Boris Spassky to win the world chess championship in 1972, the 29-year-old Fischer--who was widely regarded as a Cold War hero in the western world--appeared on a Bob Hope special in this terrific skit. (Listen to the long ovation he gets when he first appears!) Fischer showed unexpected but wonderful humor, comedic timing, and an endearing personality. Sadly, those personal traits wouldn't last long in Fischer's real life.
Tags: Bobby  Fischer  Bob  Hope  chess  comedy  skit 
Added: 16th May 2017
Views: 233
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Posted By: Lava1964
Egad! Chess Computer Beats World Champ May 11, 1997 saw one of the most important milestones in human history occur. Strangely, it was attained at the expense of humans. On that date in New York City, Garry Kasparov, the reigning world chess champion and one of the greatest players of all time, lost the deciding game of a six-game series to an IBM computer nicknamed Deep Blue. Kasparov resigned after only 19 moves, giving Deep Blue the match with a record of two wins, one loss, and three draws. The previous year, Kasparov had beaten an inferior version of Deep Blue four games to two in a series played in Philadelphia. To those in the computer industry, the triumph of Deep Blue was a cause for celebration. To many chess followers and ordinary folks, however, the result was ominous: Artificial intelligence had surpassed one of the great minds in human history. Here is a six-minute video about the 1997 event.
Tags: chess  Deep  Blue  computer  Garry  Kasparov 
Added: 20th May 2017
Views: 217
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Posted By: Lava1964

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