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Cher I Know Gooden
Tags: Had  to  do 
Added: 27th October 2007
Views: 1368
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 1388
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2809
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Scopes Trial 1925 One of the most famous trials in American history was the 1925 Scopes trial in Dayton, Tennessee. John T. Scopes, a young science teacher, was charged with violating the Butler Act, a state law that, in a roundabout way, prohibited the teaching of evolution in public schools. Scopes was quickly relegated to a minor character in the trial as the two lawyers took center stage. Civil libertarian groups hired famed defense lawyer Clarence Darrow (on the left) to represent Scopes. The prosecution obtained the services of former presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan (right), a renowned creationist and famous orator. The highlight of the trial occurred when Darrow called Bryan to testify as an expert on the Bible. (The jury was out of the courtroom when Darrow cross-examined Bryan, and the entire exchange was expunged from the court record as the judge ruled it was irrelevant to whether or not Scopes had broken the law.) Scopes was eventually found guilty and fined $100. The conviction was later overturned on a technicality: the jury was supposed to establish the fine, not the judge. Actually, the trial should not have even occurred. Scopes was not at school on the day cited in the charge. The Butler Act remained on the books in Tennessee until 1976. The trial inspired the 1960 movie Inherit The Wind.
Tags: Scopes  trial  Bryan  Darrow 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 1923
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Posted By: Lava1964
Connie Mack 1927 Baseball scholars will recognize the man on the cover of Time Magazine as Connie Mack, baseball's grand patriarch and most enduring manager. Born Cornelius McGillicuddy, Mack, a former catcher, managed the Pittsburgh Pirates for three seasons (1894 thorugh 1896) and the Philadelphia Athletics for 50 seasons (1901 through 1950) for the astonishing total of 7,755 games managed! The fact that he owned the Athletics ensured he never got fired. His teams fluctuated from greatness to ineptitude largely because he was reluctant to pay big salaries to keep his star players. (His 1931 Athletics won 107 of 154 games. In contrast, Mack's 1916 Athletics won just 36 games.) Mack never wore a uniform on the bench, always a business suit. Much beloved by the baseball establishment, Mack was once quoted as saying he preferred his teams to start well but finish in fourth place. That way he would make a profit for the season but his players couldn't demand raises!
Tags: Connie  Mack  baseball 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2213
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tina Turner and Cher Making music is their business and wow, would they make a great team!!
Tags: making  music  tina  turner  cher  70s  music 
Added: 20th November 2007
Views: 1780
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Posted By: Naomi
Anna Taylor Niagara Falls Daredevil On October 24, 1901, Anna Edson Taylor became the first person to plunge over Niagara Falls in a barrel and live to tell about it. The 43-year-old school teacher from Bay City, Michigan had no credentials as a daredevil. Anna could not even swim! She dreamed up the scheme merely as a money-making ploy. She rode in a 160-pound oak barrel. It was only 4-1/2 feet long and just 4 feet in diameter at its widest point. The barrel contained a 100-pound anvil that served as ballast to keep it upright in the water. A crude pump supplied Anna with air. Cushions fastened with leather straps were intended to keep Anna from getting hurt. Seven iron hoops were all that held the barrel together. The stunt was well publicized and several thousand people were on hand to view the event. They watched the barrel descend down the 167-foot waterfall. (It took three seconds.) It remained submerged at the bottom for another 10 seconds. When the barrel was hauled out of the water, Anna emerged bruised and bleeding from a slight cut behind her right ear. She was babbling incoherently for a few moments, but she had survived. Anna attempted to cash in on her achievement with public speaking engagements. However, from all accounts, she spoke in a boring, emotionless, raspy monotone that put audiences to sleep. Furthermore, she stupidly got rid of the barrel--a rather important prop that would have added immensely to her dull lecture. For years afterwards Anna eked out a meager living selling autographs in Niagara Falls beside a facsimile barrel. She died in 1921.
Tags: Anna  Edson  Niagara  Falls  daredevil 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 4555
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Posted By: Lava1964
Polyester leisure suit The ultimate men's fashion statement from the 1970s: the much-maligned polyester leisure suit! Polyester was first developed by British researchers during the Second World War. It became a consumer item in 1963 when an Illinois chemist named Delbert Meyer came up with a better way of producing the material. The new threads were blended with natural fibers to create clothing that almost felt like cotton or wool but was washable and wrinkle resistant. Cut from rolls of spongy double-knitted polyester, leisure suits came in all variety of colours: earth tones, blues, racing green, maroon, and the entire spectrum of pastel hues. Airless and horribly uncomfortable in hot and humid weather, polyester leisure suits clung to the wearer's arms and legs. The highly flammable synthetic melted when it burned and stuck to its wearer like napalm. Upper-class men were not impressed, and preferred to stick to their genuine wools, silks and cottons. One fashion writer declared, 'Leisure suits were just too democratic. They made everybody look like a bus driver.'
Tags: polyester  leisure  suit 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 3034
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Gaedel Midget Pinch Hitter Probably my favorite sports story is the day a midget, Eddie Gaedel, batted in a major league game. The date was August 19, 1951. The lacklustre St. Louis Browns were hosting the Detroit Tigers in a Sunday doubleheader. Browns' owner Bill Veeck promised that anyone who bought a ticket would see a memorable sight. He was right. Gaedel, all 3'7" of him, took part in a brewery promotion between games. Gaedel, clad it a batboy's uniform bearing the number 1/8 and carrying a toy bat, made baseball history in the first inning of the second game when he batted for outfielder Frank Saucier. Bob Cain, the Detroit pitcher, nearly doubled over in laughter at the sight of Gaedel and walked him on four pitches--all of them high. Once Gaedel trotted down to first base he was replaced by pinch runner Jim Delsing. Gaedel's picture appeared in virtually every newspaper in North America the next day. That same day American League president Will Harridge banned midgets from baseball. Most of the players involved in the stunt relished their connection to it. Jim Delsing said, 'A lot of guys have hit 50 home runs in a season, but I'm the only guy who ever ran for a midget.'
Tags: Eddie  Gaedel  baseball 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 4508
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Posted By: Lava1964
VJ Day Smoochers This famous photo was taken by Life Magazine photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt during the impromptu VJ Day celebrations in New York City's Times Square. For years no one knew who the two anonymous smoochers were. In 1980 Edith Shain came forward, claiming to be the nurse. When the 50th anniversary approached, Carl Muscarello declared himself to be the sailor. The two kissers got together once again in 1995 to recreate their famous pose on Tom Snyder's television program.
Tags: VJ  Day  kiss 
Added: 28th November 2007
Views: 1790
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Posted By: Lava1964

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