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Cheaper By The Dozen . . produced in 1950 by 20th Century Fox, the movie featured several big-name entertainers, including Clifton Webb as the father, Frank Bunker Gilbreth and Myrna Loy as Lillian Moller Gilbreth. Jeanne Crain played daughter Anne, the eldest of the children... i read this book first and was memorized!!
Tags: film  cheaper  by  the  dozen  clifton  webb  frank  gilbreth  myrna  loy  lillian  gilbreth  jeanne  crain  anne  gilbreth   
Added: 11th August 2007
Views: 2079
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Posted By: Marie
End of Western Union Telegrams 2006 On January 27, 2006, Western Union ended more than 150 years of telegram service. Beginning in 1854, the company began transmitting and transcribing telegraphed messages and delivering them to customers across the country. They heyday of the telegram was in the 1920s and 1930s when sending a message by telegraph was cheaper than making a long-distance telephone call. The word 'stop' was commonly used in the text of telegrams to end a sentence instead of a period because it was cheaper to send a four-letter word than a punctuation mark. Telegrams were often used for formal notifications and announcements, such as the one below to inform the recipient that he would share the 1958 Nobel Prize for Medicine/Physiology. During the Second World War, Western Union couriers were feared because they delivered official death notices to the families of servicemen. Eventually technology made telegrams obsolete and anachronistic. Only about 20,000 telegrams were sent in 2005, mostly by companies that were required to send legal notifications. On that final day of service, ten telegrams were delivered. They included a congratulatory message, a sympathy message, and, of course, a handful of messages from people who were trying to make history by sending the final Western Union telegram. Today Western Union exists only as a company that handles money transfers.
Tags: last  telegram  Western  Union  communications 
Added: 9th March 2010
Views: 2737
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Posted By: Lava1964
1903 World Series Scorecard In days gone by, all serious baseball fans used to manually keep a batter-by-batter record of ballgames on scorecards. (Some of us still do, although the custom appears to be dying out.) For the first modern World Series in 1903, the Third Base Saloon in Boston sold their own version to fans heading to the Huntington Avenue Base Ball Grounds to watch the American League champion Boston Pilgrims battle the National League champion Pittsburgh Pirates. Although the 10-cent price of this scorecard seems ridiculously cheap by today's standards, it was double the cost of what scorecards normally sold for at the ballpark during the regular season. However, it was five cents cheaper than the 15-cent pricetag the Pilgrims had affixed to the World Series scorecards sold by their vendors. The Boston Globe editorialized the hometown club was 'squeezing the dear public.'
Tags: World  Series  1903  scorecard 
Added: 30th October 2010
Views: 939
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Posted By: Lava1964
 Home Alone Commercial by on VHS December 1991 $29.98?!?! For a VHS tape? Wow...yup..DVD, were about that when they came out? so I guess in relations its the same...but a rip off considering DVDs use less plastic and easier and cheaper to mass produce with movies on them.. Recorded December 1991
Tags:   Home  Alone  Commercial  by  on  VHS  December  1991 
Added: 17th August 2012
Views: 515
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Posted By: masonx31
Postmortem Photography It seems a little bit creepy today--well, actually it seems extremely creepy by modern standards--but it was quite common in the late 19th century to photograph your loved ones in lifelike poses after they had died! Photography was generally very expensive in the 19th century. Often families had no photographs of loved ones while they were alive. Accordingly, as part of a funeral ritual, the recently deceased person would be dressed, posed in a very lifelike position--much like the gentleman in this example--and his/her image was preserved for posterity. Frequently they were posed alongside siblings and parents as part of a family portrait. Because of the slow shutter speed of cameras in those days, dead people were actually the best subjects for photographers as they were guaranteed to stay still. Postmortem photography was surprisingly commonplace in Europe and North America (especially of dead children because childhood mortality rates were very high). It remained quite common until photography became cheaper and families were more likely to have photos of their relatives taken while they were still in the land of the living.
Tags: postmortem  photography 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 693
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Posted By: Lava1964

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