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Oct 22nd     Happy  65th Birthday  Annette Annette Funicello reminisces about her singing career and how the "Annette" sound was created. She announced in 1992 that she suffers from multiple sclerosis. She had kept her condition a secret for many years, but felt it necessary to go public to combat false rumors that her impaired carriage was the result of alcoholism. That same year, she was inducted as a Disney Legend. In 1993, she opened the Annette Funicello Fund for Neurological Disorders at the California Community Foundation. She is truly a beautiful and courageous lady, who will always be loved and admired by all of us.
Tags: annette  funicello  walt  disney  productions  actresses   
Added: 22nd October 2007
Views: 12026
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Posted By: Sophia
Battleship Potemkin Baby Carriage Scene Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein's silent 1927 masterpiece Battleship Potemkin, about the failed 1905 Russian Revolution, contains this memorable and powerful scene. Tzarist troops open fire on demonstrators assembled on a staircase in Odessa. One is a mother with a baby carriage.
Tags: Sergei  Eisenstein  Battleship  Potemkin  carriage 
Added: 16th December 2007
Views: 3607
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Posted By: Lava1964
1915 Scottish Railroad Disaster The worst railroad disaster in history occurred on May 22, 1915 near Gretna Green, Dumfriesshire, Scotland. It is commonly known as the Quintinshill Disaster, having been named for the location of a nearby intermediate signal box with passing loops on each side on the Caledonian Railway Main Line linking Glasgow and Carlisle. The crash, which involved five trains, killed a probable 226 people and injured 246 others. Those killed were mainly territorial soldiers from the Royal Scots heading for the Gallipoli front in the First World War. The precise number of dead was never established with certainty as the roll list of the regiment was destroyed by the fire. The crash occurred when a troop train travelling from Larbert, Stirlingshire to Liverpool, Lancashire collided with a local passenger train that had been shunted on to the main line, to then be hit by an express train to Glasgow which crashed into the wreckage a minute later. Gas from the lighting system of the old wooden carriages of the troop train ignited, starting a fire which soon engulfed the three passenger trains and also two goods trains standing on nearby passing loops. A number of bodies were never recovered, having been wholly consumed by the fire. The bodies that were recovered were buried together in a mass grave in Edinburgh's Rosebank Cemetery. Such was the scope of the disaster that many of the rescuers wrongly assumed the trains had been targets of German saboteurs. Four bodies, believed to be of children, were never identified or claimed and are buried in the Western Necropolis, Glasgow. The cause of the accident was poor working practices on the part of the two signalmen involved. It was discovered that the two men often colluded to falsify their records of when they relieved each other, routinely did not follow regulations properly, and engaged in other unsafe practices. The results of the official inquiry into the disaster led to their imprisonment for culpable homicide after legal proceedings in both Scotland and England. A memorial to the dead soldiers was erected soon after the accident. There are a number of more recent memorials at various locations. An annual remembrance service is held at Rosebank Cemetery.
Tags: Scotland  1915  train  disaster 
Added: 13th December 2014
Views: 754
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Posted By: Lava1964
Double Life of Arthur Irwin Toronto's Arthur Irwin was the man who invented the baseball gove. In 1884, while playing with the National League's Providence Grays, Irwin broke two fingers on his catching hand. In order to keep playing, he wore a carriage driver's glove filled with cotton. At first Irwin was derided as a sissy, but within a decade almost all major leaguers were wearing gloves in the field. However, Irwin is most famous for the double life he led as a bigamist--one that only became known after he died. On July 16, 1921, Irwin was aboard a New York to Bston ship, the Calvin Murphy. He told a fellow passenger he was going home to Boston to die. The next morning, Irwin was nowhere to be found. It was surmised that he either jumped or fell overboard. Irwin left behind a grieving wife and family in Boston--and a grieving wife and family in New York City! Neither family had any inkling of the other's existence. Irwin's body was never found, leading to speculation that he had faked his death. For years there were rumors he was living in rural Georgia under an assumed name. Irwin's sister answered the accusations by saying, 'With Arthur, you never know.'
Tags: Arthur  Irwin  bigamist  disappearance 
Added: 16th August 2008
Views: 1649
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Posted By: Lava1964
Steven Truscott Case 1959 Canada's most famous criminal case of the 20th century revolved around the rape and murder of 12-year-old Lynne Harper near Clinton, Ontario in 1959. A schoolmate, 14-year-old Steven Truscott, stood trial, was convicted of murder, and sentenced to hang. The sentence was eventually reduced to life imprisonment. With some doubts lingering over the accuracy of Truscott's conviction, and sympathy because of his age, Truscott was eventually paroled from prison in 1969. He lived for many years in Guelph, Ontario under an assumed name. In 2000 he shed his alias and began to publicly clamor for a new trial. Truscott's conviction was eventually overturned in 2007 because of what the Ontario Court of Appeals perceived as "a miscarriage of justice," though the court did not formally declare him innocent. Truscott was also awarded a $6.5 million settlement by the Province of Ontario. Is Truscott a murderer? Polls generally show Canadians think he is innocent by a 3:1 ratio. However the Harper family, usually forgotten by the media and the Truscott advocates, is convinced of Truscott's guilt. The victim's older brother has publicly called the payment to Truscott a travesty. The news of it seriously affected the health of Lynne's aged father. And little Lynne Harper remains 12 years old forever...
Tags: Lynne  Harper  murder  Steven  Truscott   
Added: 9th December 2008
Views: 2754
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Posted By: Lava1964
Automobile Parade- Thomas Alvin Edison Tags: Automobile  Parade-  Thomas  Alvin  Edison  horseless  carriages  cars  autos 
Added: 10th July 2014
Views: 829
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Posted By: Freckles
Spittoons They'd be considered very unhygienic today, but in their day spittoons were actually a step up in public health. Used as a receptacle for spit generated by chewing tobacco, in the late 19th century spittoons became a common sight in pubs, brothels, saloons, hotels, stores, banks, railway carriages, and other places where people--especially adult men--gathered. Although brass was the most common material for spitoons, other materials ranged from basic functional iron to crafted cut glass and fine porcelain. At higher-class hotels, spittoons were often elaborately decorated. Spittoons were flat-bottomed, often weighted to minimize tipping over, and commonly had an interior lip to make spilling less likely even if they did tip over. Occasionally they'd have lids. Some had holes with an accompanying plug, to aid in draining and cleaning. Use of spittoons was considered an advance of public manners and health, intended to replace previously common habit of spitting on floors, streets, and sidewalks. Many jurisdictions passed laws against spitting in public--other than into a spittoon. Boy Scout troops organized campaigns to paint "Do not Spit on the Sidewalk" notices on city sidewalks. In 1909, Cincinnati scout troops allied with members of the Anti-Tuberculosis League painted thousands of such messages in a single night. A punny mass-produced sign common in saloons read: 'If you expect to rate as a gentleman, do not expectorate on the floor.' Spittoons were also useful for people suffering from tuberculosis who would cough up phlegm. Public spittoons would sometimes contain a solution of an antiseptic such as carbolic acid with the aim of limiting transmission of disease. With the start of the 20th century, medical doctors urged tuberculosis sufferers to use personal pocket spittoons instead of public ones; these were jars with tight lids which people could carry. After the deadly 1918 flu epidemic, both hygiene and etiquette advocates began to disparage public use of the spittoon, and use began to decline. Chewing gum replaced tobacco as the favorite chew of the younger generation. Cigarettes were considered more hygienic than spit-inducing chewing tobacco. While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends when they were melted down during the scrap metal drives of the Second World War.
Tags: spittoons  hygiene  tobacco 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 3476
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Posted By: Lava1964
Freaks Movie Trailer - 1932 This is a contemporary trailer created for the cult classic film Freaks long after its original 1932 release. This Tod Browning film is set in a circus sideshow and centers around the camaraderie of the "freaks"--and uses real carnival sideshow performers. The plot has two able-bodied members of the circus plotting to poison a midget to gain his inheritance. Originally planned for 94 minutes, it was cut to about an hour after very bad test screening results. (One woman claimed to have suffered a miscarriage from viewing the film.) It was a box office disaster in 1932--losing about $150,000. In the United Kingdom, Freaks was considered so shocking that it was banned for 30 years. The film was rediscovered by horror buffs in the 1960s. Shown at special midnight screenings, it developed an appreciative audience and has become a celebrated film.
Tags: Freaks  movie  circus 
Added: 30th October 2012
Views: 1358
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charley Ross Abduction Case - 1874 The first prominent child abduction in American history was the Charley Ross case. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross was playing with his five-year-old brother Walter in the front yard of their home in the affluent Germantown section of Philadelphia. Two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. They offered the two brothers candy and fireworks if they would take a ride into town with them. The naive youngsters agreed. After a short ride, the carriage stopped in front of a store. Walter was given a quarter to buy fireworks. When he came out of the store, the carriage was gone. A sobbing Walter was found by a policeman. Walter explained what had happened. He described one of the men as having "a monkey nose." Not long afterward, ransom demands were mailed to Charley's father, Christian Ross, from various post offices in and around Philadelphia. The notes demanded the enormous sum of $20,000 for the boy's safe return. Christian was heavily in debt following the 1873 stock market crash and could not afford to play the ransom. The Pinkerton Detective Agency circulated thousands of handbills with an artist's drawing of Charley's face which made the case national news. Attempts to meet with the kidnappers on several occasions failed when the abductors never showed up. There were no significant developments in the case until December 1874 when two career criminals were shot while attempting to burglarize a judge's home in Long Island. One intruder, Bill Mosher, died instantly. The other, Joe Douglas, was mortally wounded. Before he died, Douglas confessed that he and Mosher had kidnapped Charley Ross in July. Contradictory statements were given as to whether the boy was still alive. Walter was taken to Long Island to identify the dead twosome. He agreed they were the men who had taken him for the carriage ride in July. Mosher was easily identified because of his deformed "monkey nose." The Ross family resolutely continued to pursue leads for Charley well into the 1930s. Hundreds of would-be Charley Rosses were investigated. None could be proven as legitimate. It is believed the admonition, "Don't take candy from strangers" was inspired by the Charley Ross kidnapping.
Tags: Charley  Ross  kidnapping  child  abduction 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1317
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Posted By: Lava1964
Theodore Roosevelt - Near Fatal Carriage Accident On September 3, 1902, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt and several other prominent politicians came within inches of being killed by a speeding trolley car in Pittsfield, MA. The president, riding in a horse-drawn carriage, was on his way to deliver a speech when the accident occurred. The carriage was knocked about 40 feet upon impact. Secret Service agent William Craig was fatally injured, becoming the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. Roosevelt was knocked from the carriage and landed face first upon the street. He suffered superficial wounds to his face and leg. (The seriousness of Roosevelt's injuries was probably understated. Roosevelt's leg wound became infected and abscessed. He required surgery and was confined to a wheelchair for a short time. Although the leg wound healed completely, Roosevelt was bothered by the aftereffects of his injury for the rest of his life.) David J. Pratt, the driver of the carriage containing the president, was severely injured. George B. Cortelyou, Secretary to the President, was severely bruised. Winthrop Murray Crane, Governor of Massachusetts, and George P. Lawrence, Representative in Congress from the First Massachusetts district, escaped with only a few bruises. All were in the carriage with Mr. Roosevelt. A newspaper account said, "Under the sunniest of September skies the distinguished party was driving through the Berkshire Hills in a landau drawn by four white horses, the reins handled by Pratt, the President and his companions going from Dalton to Lenox. The carriage was struck squarely just behind the box on which Pratt and Craig were sitting. The vehicle was hurled 40 feet across the road. Craig was instantly killed and ground under the heavy machinery of the car into an unrecognizable mass. The President was thrown into the air and landed on the right side of his face in the roadway. Mr. Cortelyou was thrown out and almost rendered unconscious. Gov. Crane, who, next to Craig, was the nearest to the immediate danger line, was thrown out, but...escaped with only slight bruises." No one on the trolley was injured. According to reports, the trolley was speeding in an attempt to get to its destination ahead of Roosevelt's carriage. Euclid Madden was the trolley car's motorman. He received a six-month prison term for his role in the accident. James Kelley was the trolley car's conductor. In 2002, on the hundredth anniversary of the accident, the Secret Service held a special ceremony at agent Craig's grave where a marker was placed.
Tags: Theodore  Roosevelt  1902  accident  carriage  trolley 
Added: 16th September 2014
Views: 2972
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Posted By: Lava1964

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