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Lets Make A Deal Clips Here are a couple of clips from the zany game show Let's Make A Deal. Much like Deal Or No Deal, LMAD relied on the contestants' abilities to deal with psychological pressure and greed. The affable Monty Hall kept the show moving. More than 3,800 LMAD episodes ran on NBC and ABC from 1963 through 1976. It also had several incarnations as a syndicated show.
Tags: Lets  Make  A  Deal 
Added: 23rd February 2009
Views: 3922
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Posted By: Lava1964
Carnation Evaporated Milk Retro Commercial Tags: Carnation  Evaporated  Milk  Retro  Commercial  Condensed      Milk      TV      television      advertisement     
Added: 6th April 2008
Views: 1391
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Posted By: Cliffy
The Outer Limits Similar in style to The Twilight Zone, though tending more toward hard science, space travel, time travel, and human evolution, it tried to examine in each show some form of the question, 'What is the nature of man?'. The Outer Limits was an anthology show in which each episode was a self-contained story, sometimes with a plot twist. In its original incarnation the show ran for two seasons from 1963 to 1965 in black-and-white. The original title was 'Please Stand By', but at the time, America was facing the Cuban Missile Crisis and the executives thought it might make people fearful of an air raid. This is why, later in the newer series when the show would cut to a commercial, the Control Voice said, "Please stand by." A tip-of-the-hat to the original series title.
Tags: The  Outer  Limits  original  series  anthology  60s 
Added: 28th July 2008
Views: 1348
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Posted By: Naomi
The Burns and Allen Shows First Commercial Back in the 1950's, commercials were often written into the stories of the shows. Technically, you could say that the opening credits were THE first commercial, since it did say "Carnation evaporated milk is proud to present..." However, the sponsors often owned the shows, and the company name was generally thought to be part of the serie's name. For instance, The Colgate Comedy Hour. In this clip, Gracie is talking to a tax assessor who can't seem to get her to understand that taxes fund the government, as well as social services (police, fire fighters, etc). The commercial part is very brief here, so pay attention or you'll miss it.
Tags: comedy    tv    television    george    burns    gracie    allen    commercial    milk    carnation    ad    humor     
Added: 15th July 2009
Views: 2242
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Posted By: Laura
Zoom - Opening Credits Season 2 ZOOM was intended to inspire children to be active investigators, creators, and problem-solvers as well as introduce them to the principles of ethnic diversity. The show's ZOOMSci segment, for example, featured on the later incarnation, encouraged viewers to try the activities shown on ZOOM and to send in their results. (from wikipedia.org)
Tags: zoom  pbs  opening  credits 
Added: 29th July 2009
Views: 579
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Posted By: chrissiek
Brady Bunch - Final Episode The final first-run episode of The Brady Bunch aired 40 years ago today: Friday, March 8, 1974. It was the 116th installment of the show. Robert Reed (who played father Mike Brady) thought the script was so bad he refused to appear in the episode. Here's the plot: The two youngest Brady kids come up with separate ideas to make a fortune. Bobby acquires a case of hair tonic from a mail-order company and tries to sell the stuff door-to-door at $2 a bottle. Cindy intends to breed rabbits. Bobby has no luck as a salesman. Oldest brother Greg--who is about to graduate from high school--takes pity on Bobby and buys a bottle of the tonic. When he uses it, however, his hair turns a ghastly shade of bright orange! Five shampoos only serve to make Greg's hair even more hideous. Eventually a dye job at Carol Brady's favorite beauty parlor restores Greg's hair to its normal shade of black just in time for his big night where he graduates with honors. (Mike is noticeably absent when the family returns home from the ceremony. He is said to be out of town on business.) Meanwhile, Cindy's rabbit-breeding efforts are in vain because she discovers she has only male rabbits. When Bobby tries to pour his unsold tonic down a drain, he accidentally spills some of it on Cindy's rabbits. Bobby and Cindy agree to make the best of the situation by selling orange rabbits. By the 1973-74 season, The Brady Bunch was in severe decline. The kids were all over 12 years old and the show's original premise of two families merging into one was long gone. In an attempt to appeal to a younger demographic, Robbie Rist was brought in as Cousin Oliver for the final six shows. It didn't work. NBC's Sanford and Son was clobbering The Brady Bunch in the ratings so ABC pulled the plug. The last rerun aired on ABC on August 30, 1974. Still, the remarkable cult following of The Brady Bunch was strong enough to garner three failed reincarnations: The Brady Bunch Variety Hour, The Brady Brides, and The Bradys. A 1988 Brady-based made-for-TV Christmas movie drew enormous ratings.
Tags: Brady  Bunch  final  episode 
Added: 8th March 2014
Views: 2904
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Posted By: Lava1964
Oatmeal Swirlers  when I ate it 1990 or so I believe these came out in 1989, but for the purpose of this article, I remember eating it in the early 1990's. Maybe 1990-1992? The best of the Oatmeal world? The Oatmeal everyone seems to remember, a little commercial launched in the early 90s; General Mills Oatmeal Swirlers. Everyone loved Oatmeal Swirlers, at least everyone that could remember them or does remember them and anyone that had them at one point or another in their lives. This was a brilliant oatmeal, the epitome of fun with food it was an oatmeal that not only came with it's own flavoring you could choose (six different flavors in all) But the flavouring packets were also created in such a way to urge you to cut a single snippet off and use them as drawing implements on your oatmeal creating your own artistic expression upon a steaming bowl of mush. I don't care if it sounds horrible, it wasn't; it was AWESOME. From Tic-Tac-Toe played presumably with your evil alter-ego since I assume you're not going to have another person hovering over your bowl playing a rousing game of Tic-Tac-Toe against you in your oatmeal? To happy faces and pretty much anything else you could fathom or at least manage to draw on your warm gruel with your gel incarnation of artful expression the gel delights were many and plenty. Strawberry, Maple, Brown Sugar, Grape, Orange or Milk Chocolate are the flavours that this came in so far as I can remember, this is purely off a decades old fuzzy memory and at the time I wasn't in the habit of obsessively remembering things such as these because I didn't fathom they'd ever be gone and need to be remembered so don't quote me absolutely on the flavours. Never mind that, I'm right about most of them that much I know and another thing I know is that this was an unbelievably awesome oatmeal that should have never been discontinued but was. If one major product General Mills absolutely needs to bring back it's Oatmeal Swirlers Oatmeal and in that interest, I'm bringing attention to a petition I found online. It's small now but I feel perhaps if we spread this around the retro-sites of the internet maybe we can make a dent, maybe General Mills can be shown reason and the era of the Oatmeal Swirler may once more return to us in it's glorious gooey goodness. Please consider taking part and spreading this around! There is a Pension to bring them back! http://www.change.org/petitions/general-mills-bring-back-the-product-oatmeal-swirlers-instant-oatmeal
Tags: Oatmeal  Swirlers    when  I  ate  it  1990  or  so 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 4402
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Posted By: masonx31
Thom McKee - Tic Tac Dough Champ Navy officer Lt. Thom McKee became a game show superstar in 1980 when he won the staggering sum of $312,700 in cash and prizes as a contestant on Tic Tac Dough, a syndicated quiz show. McKee, age 25, appeared in 46 episodes and played 89 games. He defeated 43 opponents and tied 45 games before losing to Erik Kraepeller. In total, McKee answered 353 questions correctly. During his remarkable undefeated/winning streak, his progress was often reported by mainstream news outlets--which was basically unheard of in 1980. McKee's list of prizes included eight cars (as winners on Tic Tac Dough were awarded a new car for every fifth win), three sailboats, 16 vacations (which he was unable to take), numerous other smaller prizes, and $200,000 in cash. McKee's win was especially noteworthy because most American game shows at the time had either limits on prizes or appearances. McKee discovered the fame is fleeting, however. Shortly after his run on Tic Tac Dough ended, McKee appeared on the short-lived reincarnation of To Tell The Truth. Only one of the three panelists was able to identify him as the real Thom McKee. McKee's record-setting winnings were not surpassed until the initial run of Who Wants to be a Millionaire ushered in the era of enormous game show prizes in 1999.
Tags: Thom  McKee  game  show  winner  Tic  Tac  Dough 
Added: 12th January 2018
Views: 1058
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Posted By: Lava1964

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