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The Deck of Cards--Hank Williams Sr. Hank Williams Sr. I'm not trying to get religious here, but Wow you have to listen to the lyrics on this one.
Tags: Great  song  writing  The  Deck  of  Cards--Hank  Williams  Sr.  rockabilly  country  music  1950s 
Added: 10th February 2010
Views: 2690
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Posted By: Marty6697
Life With Lucy - 1986 Lucille Ball had 23 years of successful sitcoms from 1951 through 1974. During the next dozen years, Ball appeared only in specials and did the occasional game show. In 1986, after some serious negotiating, ABC persuaded the 75-year-old Ball to come out of retirement and do another sitcom, Life With Lucy, alongside 80-year-old Gale Gordon. Lucy would be paid for 22 episodes even if the series was cancelled before they aired or were even made. She also insisted that Bob Carroll and Madelyn Pugh--her two primary writers from I Love Lucy--would have final script approval. Lucy played a widow who moves in her with daughter's family. The first episode aired on Saturday, September 23, 1986. It ranked 23rd for the week. The reviews were not kind. Critics felt the scripts were old-fashioned and predictable. Some Lucy fans cringed watching the elderly Lucy and Gale perform stunts they did years earlier. Lucy’s timing was a bit off as well because she now needed cue cards to remember her lines. As the weeks went on, Life With Lucy steadily fell in the ratings. Within two months, it was among the lowest-rated shows on television. Lucy was shocked because she had never failed in a series before. There were occasional bright spots, though: Lucille Ball was likely at her personal best in an episode featuring John Ritter. (Each was a huge fan of the other.) An episode titled 'Mother of the Bride,' in which Audrey Meadows (of The Honeymooners) appeared as Lucy's sister, probably was the best of the bunch. Unfortunately, nothing could save what was becoming a major disappointment for ABC. Even though 13 episodes were filmed, only eight made it to the airwaves before the series was axed. 'Mother of the Bride' was the last one to air on November 15, 1986. Lucy was apparently devastated by the show's cancellation, tearfully declaring to longtime friend Ann Sothern that TV viewers only accepted a younger Lucy--not Lucy as a grandmother. ABC never aired any reruns. Life With Lucy has not yet been made available on DVD.
Tags: Life  With  Lucy  Sitcom 
Added: 21st March 2010
Views: 2031
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Posted By: Lava1964
Easter Cards G-Street-Washington DC around 1922-1923. Easter cards aren't that big anymore are they?
Tags:  
Added: 4th April 2010
Views: 1249
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Posted By: Cliffy
1903 World Series Scorecard In days gone by, all serious baseball fans used to manually keep a batter-by-batter record of ballgames on scorecards. (Some of us still do, although the custom appears to be dying out.) For the first modern World Series in 1903, the Third Base Saloon in Boston sold their own version to fans heading to the Huntington Avenue Base Ball Grounds to watch the American League champion Boston Pilgrims battle the National League champion Pittsburgh Pirates. Although the 10-cent price of this scorecard seems ridiculously cheap by today's standards, it was double the cost of what scorecards normally sold for at the ballpark during the regular season. However, it was five cents cheaper than the 15-cent pricetag the Pilgrims had affixed to the World Series scorecards sold by their vendors. The Boston Globe editorialized the hometown club was 'squeezing the dear public.'
Tags: World  Series  1903  scorecard 
Added: 30th October 2010
Views: 1103
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Posted By: Lava1964
Penny Postcards In 1873 American postmaster John Creswell introduced the first pre-stamped penny postcards. These first postcards depicted the Interstate Industrial Exposition that took place in Chicago that year. The postcards were made because people were looking for an easier way to send quick notes. They were an instant hit with the public. The first postcard to be printed as a souvenir in the United States was created in 1893 to advertise the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 19, 1898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards 'postcards,' so they were instead known as 'souvenir cards.' To adhere to the law, these cards had to be labeled 'Private Mailing Cards.' This prohibition was finally rescinded in December 24, 1901 when private companies could legally use the word 'postcard' as they pleased. The golden age of American postcards lasted until 1915. In 1908 alone, more than 677 million postcards were mailed in the United States. Below is a sample from 1905.
Tags: penny  postcards 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 1440
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rocky Marciano Punch Photo One of my favorite sports photographs: Challenger Rocky Marciano lands a solid right hand on champ Jersey Joe Walcott's jaw during their September 23, 1952 world heavyweight title fight in Philadelphia. Trailing on the scorecards, Marciano rallied to win by a 13th-round kayo. Many people wrongly assume this was the knockout punch; it wasn't. Walcott was along the ropes when Marciano caught him with the fateful blow.
Tags: Rocky  Marciano  boxing  Jersey  Joe  Walcott 
Added: 2nd December 2010
Views: 3423
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Posted By: Lava1964
Civil War News Trading Cards Civil War News was a set of 88 collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists. The card set was characterized by vivid colors, graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (card #21 'Painful Death' being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person. The information was presented in newspaper-article fashion complete with a headline. The complete set of cards, including a checklist, was first printed for the American market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada. A&BC produced the sets in England. The cards came five to a wax pack with a stick of bubble gum. Also included in each package was a facsimile of Confederate paper currency. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips.
Tags: trading  cards  Civil  War  News 
Added: 9th February 2011
Views: 5330
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 3071
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dance Cards Here was a quaint custom that has sadly disappeared: Dance cards. A dance card was commonly used by a young woman to record the names of the gentlemen with whom she intended to dance each successive dance at a formal ball. They appear to have originated in 18th century, but their use first became widespread in 19th century Vienna. Typically a card would list of all the dances for the evening and their style: for example, waltz, polka, or quadrille. Opposite each dance was a space to record the name of the scheduled partner for that dance. After the event ended, the card was frequently kept by the young lady as a souvenir of the evening. Typically, it would have a cover indicating the date and sponsoring organization of the ball and a decorative cord by which it could be attached to a lady's wrist or ball gown. From the 19th century until the First World War, dance cards for the elite of Austria-Hungary were often very elaborate, with some even incorporating precious metals and jewels. In modern times the expression "dance card" is often used metaphorically, as when someone says "pencil me into your dance card," meaning "find some time to spend with me". Conversely, someone's "dance card is full" implies that even though they may be interested, they have no time for another person.
Tags: dance  cards 
Added: 3rd September 2011
Views: 2415
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Posted By: Lava1964
TV Goofs-The Brady Bunch A number of continuity errors in this one clip. Can you spot them all?
Tags: TV  Goofs,  The  Brady  Bunch,  continuity  errors,  errors,  continuity,  house  of  cards   
Added: 14th October 2011
Views: 8226
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Posted By: pfc

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