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Boogie - Canadian Disco TV Show This show definitely belongs in a time capsule: Boogie--billed as "Canada's hippest TV Show"-- was a 1970s program produced by City-TV, an independent Toronto station. It was a weekly, low-budget show designed to capitalize on the disco craze. Every week it featured local dancers, disco fashion shows, and a dance competition. R. Paul Godfrey was its host. When disco died, it died too. Boogie was largely forgotten until it was resurrected in campy reruns as Retro Boogie Dance Party in the early 2000s on MuchMusic, a Canadian cable music channel.
Tags: Boogie  disco  dancing  TV  Canada 
Added: 23rd August 2015
Views: 5083
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Posted By: Lava1964
1952 Corn Pops Commercial The two stars of The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Guy Madison and Andy Devine, promote Kellogg's Corn Pops in this 1952 commercial. The syndicated western ran from 1951 though 1958. More than a dozen feature films were made by combining various TV episodes. Bit of trivia: Andy Devine's very recognizable gravelly voice was the result of an odd childhood accident. He damaged his vocal chords when he fell while he had a stick in his mouth! Although he has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Guy Madison, who died in 1996 at age 74, is largely forgotten in North America. He had greater success in Italy where he stared in low-budget westerns and combat films in the 1960s.
Tags: Corn  Pops  Commercial  Andy  Devine  Guy  Madison  Wild  Bill  Hickok 
Added: 7th September 2015
Views: 1601
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Posted By: Lava1964
Budweiser Halloween Magazine Ad Tags: Budweiser  Halloween  Magazine  Ad  Advertisement  beer   
Added: 30th October 2015
Views: 764
Rating:
Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Archie Bunker Eulogizes Stretch Cunningham This ten-minute clip, condensed from scenes from a January 1977 episode titled "Stretch Cunningham, Goodbye," proves what a great TV program All in the Family was. Here's the plot: Archie's beloved work buddy Stretch Cunningham passes away suddenly from a heart attack. Archie is cajoled into delivering a eulogy at the funeral. He enlists the help of son-in-law Mike (Meathead) Stivic to write a eulogy containing biblical references--only to discover at the last possible moment that Stretch was secretly Jewish! The clip mixes great humor and heartfelt love.
Tags: Archie  Bunker  eulogy  Stretch  Cunningham  All  in  the  Family 
Added: 11th November 2015
Views: 1329
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Boxing Champ Howard Davis Passes It has been announced that Howard Davis Jr., a gold medalist on the vastly talented 1976 American Olympic boxing team, passed away at age 59 from inoperable lung cancer on December 30, 2015. In a TV news interview conducted about two weeks before his death late, Davis claimed he had never used tobacco nor alcohol throughout his entire life. Davis was one of five American gold medalists who dominated the Montreal Olympic boxing tournament. Davis won the Val Barker Award as the most outstanding boxer in those Games. This was quite a feat considering the other American gold medalists were Sugar Ray Leonard, Leo Randolph, Michael Spinks, and Leon Spinks. Davis was a sentimental favorite as his mother died from a heart attack just a week before the Olympics began. Davis won two of his five Olympic bouts in the lightweight division by knockout, but as a professional he seldom displayed punching power, recording only 14 knockouts in 43 fights. Davis' lack of a big punch and generally cautious approach to his bouts made him far less marketable to TV audiences than Ray Leonard or Michael Spinks. Nevertheless, three times Davis fought for pro world titles and three times he lost. His last title fight loss--a first-round defeat to Buddy McGirt in 1988--sent Davis into retirement. Six years later Davis won three comeback fights before suffering a bad knockout defeat as a middleweight which ended his boxing career. His overall pro record was 36-6-1. The other four American Olympic champs from 1976--plus heavyweight bronze medalist John Tate--won at least some version of a world title at the professional level.
Tags: Olympic  boxer  Howard  Davis  passes 
Added: 2nd January 2016
Views: 797
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wall Street Bombing - 1920 One of the least remembered terrorist attacks in American history occurred just past noon on Thursday, September 16, 1920 in the hub of America's financial center--New York City's Wall Street. An unattended horse-drawn wagon loaded with a bomb containing dynamite and 500 pounds of small iron weights was parked in front of 23 Wall Street. The corner building was then the headquarters of J.P. Morgan & Co., the nation's most powerful bank. At 12:01 p.m., the timer on the bomb reached zero and a terrific explosion rocked the street. The concussion from the blast was so severe that it derailed a trolley car two blocks away. Several hundred people were injured by flying shrapnel and broken glass falling from the surrounding buildings. There were 38 fatalities--most of whom were not major financial magnates, but average Wall Street employees: clerical staff and messengers on their lunch breaks. Anarchist literature was found nearby threatening violence unless unnamed political prisoners were released. No arrests were ever made in the case, but historians and crime buffs strongly believe the bombing was carried out by an anti-capitalist/anarchist named Mario Buda who fled to Italy shortly after the bombing and stayed there until his death in 1963. Buda apparently was motivated by the arrests of fellow anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti earlier that year for the April 15, 1920 robbery of a Massachusetts shoe factory's payroll in which a security guard was killed. The only two deadlier terrorists attacks on American soil in the 20th century were the Bath School bombing of 1927 and the massive explosion at the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995. Despite the passage of nearly a century, deep shrapnel marks from the 1920 explosion are still visible on the limestone facade of 23 Wall Street.
Tags: Wall  Street  Bombing  terrorism 
Added: 15th February 2016
Views: 1414
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rainstorm Terminates 1976 NFL-College Game Several years ago I made a post regarding the annual "Chicago All-Star Game"--an NFL preseason contest that pitted the reigning champions versus a team of top collegiate all-stars. Played from 1934 to 1976, it was held annually at Chicago's Soldier Field. The gate receipts benefited various charities. Here's a 10-minute clip from the clash between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the College All-Stars in July 1976. Frank Gifford and Bud Wilkinson are calling the game for ABC. One of the most severe rainstorms you'll ever see at a sports event--combined with out-of-control fans invading the field--caused the game to be terminated late in the third quarter with Pittsburgh comfortably ahead 24-0. With NFL teams becoming less and less willing to risk their promising rookies for the sake of an exhibition game, the 1976 game was the last of the series. It was also the last game that Ara Parseghian ever coached. The former Notre Dame coach had retired after the 1974 season, but he was coaxed out of retirement to coach the College All-Stars in this game.
Tags: rainstorm  NFL-College  All-Star  Game  football 
Added: 24th November 2016
Views: 1208
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Posted By: Lava1964
2002 MLB All-Star Game Controversial Tie While the other three major North American team sports' All-Star Games have become farces, baseball's mid-summer classic still retains its luster for being competitive and hard-fought, and unchanged in its format since it was first played in 1933. Since day one it's always been the American League versus the National League. At the 2002 ASG in Milwaukee, however, the game suffered a huge public-relations blow because it was stopped after 11 innings deadlocked at 7-7, when both teams ran out of pitchers. This development was the result of a change in ASG philosophy that strongly encouraged managers to use everyone on the bench. The days of Willie Mays playing in the ASG from start to finish (which he did 11 times) were gone. Instead, managers liberally moved players in and out of the lineup so that it resembled something akin to a softball game at a church picnic where, to avoid hurt feelings, everyone participates. Commissioner Bud Selig made the decision to halt the game in consultation with the umpiring crew and both managers. The crowd of more than 41,000 spectators was outraged that the game ended without a winner. Furthermore, no MVP was selected because of the inconclusive outcome--a strange decision did not make a lot of sense. The following year, as a way to make the contest more meaningful, it was decided that whichever league won the ASG would get home field advantage for the World Series that autumn. That policy, which had its supporters and detractors, was kept until 2016.
Tags: MLB  baseball  2002  All-Star  Game  tie 
Added: 12th July 2017
Views: 938
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fair Exchange - Failed Sitcom In September 1962 CBS unveiled something new--an hour-long sitcom titled Fair Exchange. Its premise was that an American family and a British family swapped teenage daughters for a year. Why? The two families' patriarchs had been Second World War flying buddies. The American daughter, Patty Walker, wanted to study in London, so the two families, in effect, arranged their own version of an exchange student program. (Judy Carne played the English teen, Heather Finch. It was her first American television role. Even though she played a teenager, Carne was 23 years old at the time.) The episodes generally focused on the difficulties each girl had adopting to the cultural differences of her new location. Filmed in both England and Hollywood, the 60-minute format proved too unwieldy and the show was canceled in December 1962. Three months later, after loyal fans put pressure on CBS, the network returned Fair Exchange to its schedule--but only in a revised half-hour format. Ratings did not merit the show continuing beyond one season, however. Fair Exchange was again cancelled before the 1963-64 TV season began after 27 episodes. Here is the opening montage for the 60-minute version.
Tags: Fair  Exchange  sitcom  Judy  Carne  CBS 
Added: 26th April 2018
Views: 721
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Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character- Larry Mondello Robert (Rusty) Stevens played Larry Mondello in 67 episodes of the first three seasons of Leave It To Beaver between 1957 and 1960. That meant he appeared in approximately 2/3 of those 102 shows. Larry was Beaver's best buddy. Good-natured, obese, but not the brightest kid on the planet, Larry often led Beaver into various messes. We never saw Larry's father, but his harried mother (played by Madge Blake) was constantly threatening Larry with the consequences of his iron-fisted pop laying down the law on him once he got home from another business trip. After the 1959-60 season, however, Larry just vanished from the sitcom. According to some reports, Rusty Stevens' father took a job in Pennsylvania. Thus the Stevens family was suddenly uprooted from California, which effectively ended Rusty's TV career. However, a few reports--including comments made by Barbara Billingsley (who played June Cleaver) late in her life--indicate that Stevens' mother was an insufferable stage mom whose presence and antics rankled the producers. Eventually the brains behind the show had had enough of her and decided abruptly to drop Larry Mondello from the show.
Tags: Larry  Mondello  Leave  It  to  Beaver  Rusty  Stevens 
Added: 26th October 2018
Views: 760
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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