Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Ball Four - Sitcom Flop 1976 Ball Four was a situation comedy that aired on CBS in 1976. The series was inspired by the tremendously successful 1970 book of the same name by Jim Bouton. Bouton co-created the show with humorist and television critic Marvin Kitman and sportswriter Vic Ziegel. Bouton also starred in the series. Ball Four followed the Washington Americans, a fictitious minor league baseball team, dealing with the fallout from a series of Sports Illustrated articles written by Americans' player Jim Barton (Bouton). Like the book, the series covered controversial subjects including womanizing players, drug use, homosexuality in sports, and religion. The series included a gay rookie ballplayer--one of the earliest regular gay characters on television. The creative trio began developing the series in 1975, looking to groundbreaking series like M*A*S*H and All in the Family as models. CBS expressed interest and the creative team developed a script. CBS shot the pilot episode and ultimately bought the series. Ball Four aired at 8:30 PM Eastern time, which was during the Family Viewing Hour, an FCC-mandated hour of early evening "family-friendly" broadcasting. Consequently the writers had some trouble with the network's Standards and Practices in their attempt to portray realistic locker room scenes, especially the language used by the players. Pseudo-profanity such as "bullpimp" was disallowed, while "horse-crock" and "bullhorse" were approved. Ball Four debuted on September 22, 1976. Critics panned the series. One of the more charitable reviews called it "uneven in quality." CBS cancelled Ball Four after just five episodes.
Tags: sitcom  Ball  Four  baseball  CBS 
Added: 23rd August 2011
Views: 1561
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Announcerless Telecast - 1980 "We are just moments away from the kickoff of today's Jets-Dolphins game and a telecast that figures to be different. The fact that we try something different--and dare to--has been greeted with almost every kind of reaction, from good-natured humor to applause to some surprising anger." That's how NBC's Bryant Gumbel's introduced what was about to happen on Saturday, December 20, 1980: NBC was going to broadcast an entire NFL game from Miami's Orange Bowl with neither a play-by-play announcer nor an analyst. It was a meaningless, season-ending game for two mediocre NFL teams, but Don Ohlmeyer (pictured here) turned it into a happening. Ohlmeyer was the first producer of Monday Night Football. He produced and directed three Olympics, won 16 Emmy awards, and is a member of the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Based on his years of experience, Ohlmeyer always believed that sports announcers talked too much. Here was an attention-seeking vehicle that would drive that point home. Ohlmeyer also thought the gimmick might be a way to boost ratings points out of an otherwise unattractive matchup. Dick Enberg, who was one of NBC's lead football announcers at the time, was not amused. He was worried. "My first reaction was of incredible nervousness," he recalled. "We're paid to talk, so all of us want to fill the air with lots of exciting words. We all gathered together, hoping that Ohlmeyer was dead wrong. I mean, he was flirting with the rest of our lives. What if this crazy idea really worked?" The game, won by the New York Jets 24-17, featured only sounds that could be picked up by on-field microphones, the referee's calls, plus the usual announcements from the Orange Bowl's stadium announcer. To compensate for the absence of TV announcers, NBC went overboard on its graphics and pre-recorded soundbites of players and coaches. It was a onetime experiment that was largely mocked by TV critics. Surprisingly, though, comments received at NBC's switchboard were about 60% favorable.
Tags: NFL  NBC  announcerless  telecast  Don  Ohlmeyer 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 2003
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
N.Y. Yankees Fire Red Barber - 1966 Red Barber was one of the great baseball broadcasters of all time. He began as the radio voice of the Cincinnati Reds in 1934. He became the Brooklyn Dodgers' lead broadcaster in 1939 and held that position until 1953 when he fell into disfavor with Dodger management over salary demands. The New York Yankees quickly hired Barber to work alongside Mel Allen beginning in 1954. The two men had contrasting styles but they meshed well together. Barber was the restrained southern gentleman while Allen was exuberant and bombastic. Barber's tenure with the Yankees ended suddenly at the end of the 1966 season--largely because he had the courage to report the truth. The Yankees, owned by CBS at the time, were a last-place team in 1966. During a home game on Thursday, September 22, only 413 fans were scattered around the cavernous ballpark to watch the Yankees play the visiting Chicago White Sox in a makeup game. The TV cameramen were under strict instructions from CBS media relations not to follow foul balls into the sea of empty seats. Barber, though, took it upon himself to paint the scene with words. "I don't know what the paid attendance is today," he said, "but whatever it is, it is the smallest crowd in the history of Yankee Stadium...and this crowd is the story, not the game." That game was the first for CBS executive Mike Burke as team president. A week later, Barber was invited to a breakfast meeting where Burke abruptly told him that his contract wouldn't be renewed for 1967. Barber was so stunned by the news that he rose from the table and left the restaurant without speaking. Barber had fully expected Burke to reaffirm his importance to a rebuilding team. Barber retired from sports broadcasting altogether. He died in 1992 at age 84.
Tags: Red  Barber  baseball  Yankees  fired  broadcaster 
Added: 21st September 2011
Views: 3245
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Antiques Roadshow Spoof I love this show and would fall over if I ever saw this!
Tags: Antiques  Roadshow  Spoof  PBS  Public  Broadcasting  Service 
Added: 3rd July 2012
Views: 2163
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
New Food for 1957 - Pizza This clip from a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation program from 1957 introduces that new, exotic food--pizza!
Tags: CBC  pizza 
Added: 8th October 2012
Views: 2145
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bill Cullen Secret Disability The affable Bill Cullen is largely considered one of the greatest TV game show hosts ever. (One poll lists him as THE greatest.) Witty and charming, Cullen was a fixture as a game show host and as a regular panelist on I've Got a Secret for years. One source claims he earned $300,000 in 1958--an extraordinary sum for that era. During his impressive broadcasting career which spanned from radio sports commentary in 1942 to his umpteenth TV game show gig in 1986, Cullen hid an obvious physical disability: As a toddler in 1921 he had been stricken by polio. As a teen he was further crippled in a motorcycle mishap. The end result was that Cullen had severe mobility issues until the day he died. As was the norm at the time, the TV networks did their best to hide Cullen's disability as a kindness to him. Every game show he hosted he was never shown walking to his place; he was always already seated behind a podium and stayed that way for the show's duration. On July 9, 1961 he was a mystery guest on the original What's My Line. Usually the WML mystery guest would be shown signing in and then walking a few feet to sit beside host John Daly. When Cullen entered, the camera focused on the blindfolded panelists until he was seated--which must have puzzled millions of viewers that night. Mel Brooks related a horribly awkward story about a time he appeared on the Cullen-hosted game show Eye Guess in the late 1960s. At the end of the tapings, Brooks walked toward Cullen's desk to thank him for having him on. Cullen walked towards Brooks with his arms flailing and his feet turned over at the ankles. Brooks thought Cullen was doing a deliberately comical walk, so Brooks mimicked it! Brooks was aghast when someone shouted that Cullen was disabled. Cullen, however, laughed loudly and told Brooks he was glad someone finally had the courage to poke fun at him. Cullen said he always felt self-conscious about the special treatment he received. Cullen also suffered through pancreatic surgery in the late 1960s. He was never as robust looking afterwards. A lifelong smoker, Cullen succumbed to lung cancer in 1990 at age 70.
Tags: Bill  Cullen  polio  TV  host  disability 
Added: 18th June 2015
Views: 7154
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Pat Summerall 1930-2013 Pat Summerall, one of the great voices in sports broadcasting, died on April 16, 2013. He would have turned 83 on May 10. A former NFL placekicker, Summerall started broadcasting football for CBS in 1964 and became a play-by-play man in 1974. He is best remembered for his calm, restrained manner in contrast to his excitable longtime booth partner John Madden. Summerall was also a fixture at CBS' coverage of The Masters golf tourney and the U.S. Open Tennis Championships for many years. Once CBS lost its NFL contract in 1993, Summerall and Madden joined Fox's NFL coverage. Sadly, CBS would no longer allow Summerall to cover golf or tennis despite being with the network for nearly 40 years.
Tags: Pat  Summerall  sports  broadcaster  NFL 
Added: 17th April 2013
Views: 922
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Make Room for Granddaddy Failed attempt to revitalize Make Room for Daddy.
Tags: Make  Room  for  Granddaddy    Danny  ThomasDanny  Williams  Marjorie  Lord  Kathy  Williams  tAngela  Cartwright    Linda  Williams  Michael  Hughes    Michael  Wilson  Rusty  Hamer    Rusty  Williams    Make  Room  for  Daddy  TV  Series  TV  70's  1970  ABC  American  Broadcasting  Corporation 
Added: 8th August 2014
Views: 1439
Rating:
Posted By: Freckles
Don Pardo Announces Jeopardy This is how I remember Don Pardo who passed today at the age of 96.
Tags: Don    Pardo    NBC    National    Broadcasting    Company    SNL    Saturday    Night    Live    announcer  Jeopardy  Art  Flemming 
Added: 19th August 2014
Views: 1387
Rating:
Posted By: pfc
Don Pardo Passes at age 96 Long time NBC announcer Don Pardo passes at the age of 96. Here is a clip of his 90th birthday celebration at Saturday Night Live when he was 90.
Tags: Don  Pardo  NBC  National  Broadcasting  Company  SNL  Saturday  Night  Live  announcer 
Added: 19th August 2014
Views: 825
Rating:
Posted By: pfc

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 of 4 | Random