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Boy in the Plastic Bubble Final Scene This movie was very touching and the theme song is another Paul Williams gem. I think it was this movie where John Travolta started dating Diana Hyland who passed away from breast cancer in 1977. Hyland won an Emmy for this role.
Tags: John  Travolta  Glynnis  O'Connor  Diana  Hyland  Robert  Reed  Paul  Williams 
Added: 25th November 2008
Views: 1764
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Posted By: LPROUD
Wings - First Best Picture Winner The first movie to win the coveted Best Picture Oscar was Wings, a silent masterpiece from 1927. Starring Buddy Rogers, Richard Arlen and Clara Bow, Wings is a drama about two American aviators who enlist in the First World War. The film's aerial shots of dogfights were revolutionary for the time. Gary Cooper, at the beginning of his great career, has a small role as a pilot who is killed in a training flight crash. The film also has some surprising nudity for its time: Clara Bow's breasts are shown for a fraction of a second in a scene where she is surprised while dressing. There is also a long shot through a door of nude army recruits preparing to undergo their physical exams. The movie was incredibly popular in its day. It ran for 63 weeks (with several showings each day) at New York City's Criterion Theater--a major venue that seated about 3,000 people--before it was released to smaller movie houses. Wings was considered a lost film for many years until a copy was discovered in a film archive in Paris. It is the only Best Picture-winning film not currently available on DVD, although is can be obtained on videotape. A very good organ score accompanies the VHS copy of Wings I bought many years ago.
Tags: Wings  Oscar  Clara  Bow  silent  film 
Added: 21st February 2011
Views: 1388
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Posted By: Lava1964
1896 Five-Dollar Silver Certificate Controversy A new series of $1, $2 and $5 banknotes were printed by the U.S. government in 1896. Known to collectors as the "educational series," the banknotes used classical art motifs to promote advancements in science. For example, the $5 silver certificate's design (shown below) highlighted the new importance that electricity brought to modern society. However, the naked breasts on the female figures sent some prudish folks into a tizzy. Some merchants and bankers in Boston considered the $5 bills to be obscene and refused to accept them--thus creating the term 'banned in Boston.' Despite the controversy, many banknote collectors consider the 1896 series to be the most beautiful ever produced by the U.S. government.
Tags: 1896  banknotes  numismatics  controversy 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 2881
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marcia Strassman Dies at 66 Marcia Strassman, 66, who played Gabe Kaplan's wife, Julie, on the 1970s sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter, died Friday, October 24, 2014 at her Sherman Oaks, CA home after battling breast cancer for seven years. Strassman had numerous roles on television and in film during her five-decade career. She played nurse Margie Cutler on the first season of M*A*S*H before her breakout role in Welcome Back, Kotter. The show was about a teacher returning to the tough high school of his youth to teach a classroom full of misfits dubbed the Sweathogs. She also played Rick Moranis' wife in the Disney hit movie Honey I Shrunk the Kids and its sequel, Honey I Blew Up the Kid.
Tags: Marcia  Strassman  obituary  Kotter  TV 
Added: 30th October 2014
Views: 534
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Posted By: Lava1964
1916 Booby Quarter By the 1910s the Art Nouveau movement was influencing the designs of American coinage. In 1916 designer Hermon McNeil created what he thought was an attractive portrait of Lady Liberty for the new silver 25-cent piece. No red flags were raised as the design received official approval for mintage in late 1916 for distribution in January 1917. Instead of winning applause, however, the coin caused outrage because the Standing Liberty figure (as it is known to collectors) has her right breast exposed. Moralists decried the image as obscene and decadent. The public's response was so swift and negative that the Treasury Department modified the die for future strikes to cover the exposed breast with armor--even doing so without the official approval of Congress. Furthermore, the federal government did its best to recall the original allotment of 52,000 coins. That was easier said than done. First, any new coin is largely hoarded by collectors for its novelty. Second, the small mintage of these coins enhanced their desirability among collectors. Third, the infamy attached to this coin made it even more collectible than usual. Therefore most of the 1916 "booby quarters" did not stay in circulation very long before they were stashed away by average citizens as curiosity pieces (and perhaps erotic souvenirs). According to the Treasury Department, however, the public's moral outrage had nothing to do with the more modest revised design. It was supposedly symbolic. With war clouds looming, it was thought that Lady Liberty should be shown as fully protected by armor rather than being seen as partially exposed and vulnerable.
Tags: 1916  Standing  Liberty  quarter  breast  numismatics 
Added: 27th October 2016
Views: 565
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Posted By: Lava1964

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