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Philo T. Farnsworth Inventor of TV Tags: philo      farnsworth      television      video      technology      game      show      science      history      invention      breakthrough      quantum      leap      electronic     
Added: 2nd March 2008
Views: 1269
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Posted By: pfc
Philo Farnsworth on Ive Got A Secret Tags: philo      farnsworth      television      video      technology      game      show      science      history      invention      breakthrough      quantum      leap      electronic     
Added: 2nd March 2008
Views: 1098
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Posted By: pfc
The Outlaw 1941 The Outlaw was Jane Russell's controversial breakthrough movie role. Producer Howard Hughes made this flick about the life of Billy The Kid in 1941, but it did not see general release until 1946. The Hays Office, responsible for censorship at the time, considered The Outlaw to be overtly sexual. (The film would likely get a G rating today.) Hughes knew what sold: He had designed a cantilevered brassiere to showcase Russell's ample assets! Hughes gladly kept the film out of circulation knowing full well its infamy would pay off in box office receipts upon its release.
Tags: Jane  Russell  The  Outlaw  Howard  Hughes 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 2003
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Posted By: Lava1964
Joseph Kaeble - VC Winner Earlier I posted the brief Heritage Minute clip about the three Victoria Cross winners who all lived on Pine Street in Winnipeg. This is the story of another VC winner: 26-year-old Corporal Joseph Kaeble, who single-handedly repelled a German breakthrough on the Western Front in June 1918. Lake most VC winners, Corporal Kaeble got his medal posthumously.
Tags: Joseph  Kaeble  Victoria  Cross  winner 
Added: 30th January 2013
Views: 1067
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Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 2017
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Posted By: Lava1964
Theda Bara - Forgotten Movie Star Theda Bara is a largely forgotten movie star for two reasons: Her career ended in 1926 so she did not make a single sound film, and most of her 40 feature films were lost in a 1937 studio vault fire. Although she was born in Cincinnati in 1885, studio publicists tried to make her ancestry more exotic than it really was. At one point Bara was listed as being born in a Middle Eastern desert to French and Arabian parents. Bara's faux first name was either a childhood nickname or an anagram of the word 'death'--depending on which fan magazine you read. Her birth name was Theodosia Burr Goodman. Be that as it may, Bara became very famous for her portrayal of Cleopatra in a 1917 feature film. She wore a risque costume and described herself as a 'vamp'--an abbreviation of the word vampire. Only a few seconds of her breakthrough performance survives. She declared she would continue playing vamps 'as long as people sin.' After getting married in 1921, Bara only made two more films before retiring five years later. She died of stomach cancer in 1955 at age 69. Only four of her films are known to exist.
Tags: Theda  Bara  silent  films  star  vamp  Cleopatra 
Added: 23rd June 2015
Views: 1217
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Posted By: Lava1964

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