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Dempsey-Carpentier Bout - First Million-Dollar Gate On Saturday, July 2, 1921, world heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey defended his title versus France's Georges Carpentier. The venue was a specially built stadium at a place called Boyle's Thirty Acres in Jersey City, NJ. More than 92,000 fans filled the wooden bowl paying between $5.50 for a distant perch in the far bleachers and $50 for a ringside seat. All told, the crowd paid nearly $1.8 million for the privilege of watching a prize fight--the first time the million-dollar mark had ever been eclipsed. The huge gate was the result of several factors: Dempsey was an exciting heavyweight with plenty of knockouts on his record. Carpentier was a glamorous and handsome French war hero whose every move was followed in the society pages of New York City's newspapers. Thus women attended the fight in huge numbers. (In contrast, Dempsey was disliked in some quarters for having no service record during the First World War.) The fight was broadcast on the new medium of radio for the first time. With the stadium dangerously swaying due to the weight of the enormous crowd, the main event started about 30 minutes early. Before the fight started, promoter Tex Rickard pleaded with Dempsey not to knock out the much smaller Carpentier in the first round so the fans would get their money's worth. Dempsey agreed, but he was solidly hit with a hard right hand from the Frenchman. This was bad news for the challenger: Carpentier broke his thumb with the blow--and he had angered the fearsome champion. Dempsey wore down Carpentier with hard body shots into the fourth round. In that fourth round Carpentier was knocked down twice. The second time he did not get up. Dempsey received $300,000 for about 11 minutes of work.
Tags: boxing  Jack  Dempsey  Georges  Carpentier. 
Added: 19th July 2015
Views: 672
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Patterson-Rademacher fight 1957 The 1950s are often described as the golden age of boxing--when depth and talent were supposedly at their finest in the sweet science. People tend to forget that the heavyweight division was rather weak for much of the decade. Contenders for the world heavyweight title were so scarce that Pete Rademacher, the 1956 Olympic gold medalist, got a coveted shot at world heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson's title in his pro debut! Having won the heavyweight laurels in Melbourne in 1956 by scoring three knockouts in his only three bouts, Rademacher, a Washingtonian, somehow persuaded the powers that be that it would be a great idea if he could fight Patterson in Seattle' Sick Stadium in a unique amateur-versus-pro matchup. Patterson agreed if the promoters could guarantee him $250,000. They did--so the fight was set for August 22, 1957. Surprisingly, Rademacher did well in the first two rounds, pressing the action and even scoring a knockdown with a hard right hand. By the fourth round, however, Patterson's class began to show. He scored one of what would be seven knockdowns of the game challenger. Eventually Rademacher was knocked out in the fifth round. The promotion barely generated financial enough interest to meet Patterson's guaranteed payday. Depending on which source you believe, Rademacher got either absolutely nothing or a laughable $1.75 for his losing effort. Undaunted, Rademacher fought hard-hitting Zora Folley in his next bout--and was knocked out again. Rademacher ended his pro boxing career with a 15-7-1 record. All seven of his defeats came at the hands of world-class fighters. As of August 2015, Pete was still alive and kicking at age 86.
Tags: Pete  Rademacher  boxing  amateur  Floyd  Patterson 
Added: 17th August 2015
Views: 818
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Campbell-Hyland 1913 Boxing Photo Normally I don't approve of colorizing black-and-white photos, but this one shows why sometimes it makes a difference. The final bell has just ended a gory May 3, 1913 boxing match in Steveston, British Columbia between welterweights Ray Campbell and Dick Hyland. Each fighter has his armed raised in victory by his respective manager after 15 rounds of what must have been intense action. (Campbell, the fighter on the left, won the decision.) I bet nobody in the crowd was clamoring for a refund.
Tags: boxing  Campbell-Hyland  blood 
Added: 30th September 2015
Views: 623
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Spectacular Knockout Cardona-Avelar 1982 This may be the most devastating knockout ever suffered by a boxing champion defending his title. On March 20, 1982 Mexico's Antonio Avelar was making the second defense of his WBC world flyweight championship. His opponent was Colombia's Prudencio Cardona. Cardona, age 30, had competed in the 1972 Olympics and was thought to be past his prime. Nevertheless, Cardona delivered a knockout for the ages in the very first round to win the crown. This is Spanish commentary of the short fight. Skip to about 2:10 to get to the surprising and sudden finish.
Tags: flyweight  boxing  Prudencio  Cardona  Antonio  Avelar 
Added: 5th October 2015
Views: 784
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Benny Leonard - Sad Last Fight Throughout boxing history many great champions have either lingered too long or have made ill-advised comebacks only to suffer a bad defeat at the hands of a younger, fitter man. Benny Leonard, one of the greatest lightweights of all time, falls into this category. He reigned as world lightweight champion from 1917 to 1925 when he retired from the ring at age 28 at his mother's insistence. A master boxer, the hugely popular Leonard was almost unbeatable in his prime. Leonard lost all his savings when the stock market crashed in 1929 and was forced to make a comeback to earn a living. Starting in October 1931 Leonard won 19 fights and had one draw versus mostly substandard opposition. On October 7, 1932 he was paired against rising welterweight star Jimmy McLarnin--a terrific boxer-puncher who was 10 years younger than the 36-year-old Leonard. This condensed version of the fight at Madison Square Garden shows McLarnin administering a sound beating on the gallant old champ before referee Arthur Donovan wisely steps in to halt the contest in the sixth round. McLarnin would win the world welterweight title within a year. Leonard never fought again, but he stayed involved in boxing as a very capable referee. Leonard died of a heart attack while refereeing a bout in 1947. He was just 11 days past his 51st birthday.
Tags: boxing  Benny  Leonard  Jimmy  McLarnin 
Added: 17th November 2015
Views: 632
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Boxing Champ Howard Davis Passes It has been announced that Howard Davis Jr., a gold medalist on the vastly talented 1976 American Olympic boxing team, passed away at age 59 from inoperable lung cancer on December 30, 2015. In a TV news interview conducted about two weeks before his death late, Davis claimed he had never used tobacco nor alcohol throughout his entire life. Davis was one of five American gold medalists who dominated the Montreal Olympic boxing tournament. Davis won the Val Barker Award as the most outstanding boxer in those Games. This was quite a feat considering the other American gold medalists were Sugar Ray Leonard, Leo Randolph, Michael Spinks, and Leon Spinks. Davis was a sentimental favorite as his mother died from a heart attack just a week before the Olympics began. Davis won two of his five Olympic bouts in the lightweight division by knockout, but as a professional he seldom displayed punching power, recording only 14 knockouts in 43 fights. Davis' lack of a big punch and generally cautious approach to his bouts made him far less marketable to TV audiences than Ray Leonard or Michael Spinks. Nevertheless, three times Davis fought for pro world titles and three times he lost. His last title fight loss--a first-round defeat to Buddy McGirt in 1988--sent Davis into retirement. Six years later Davis won three comeback fights before suffering a bad knockout defeat as a middleweight which ended his boxing career. His overall pro record was 36-6-1. The other four American Olympic champs from 1976--plus heavyweight bronze medalist John Tate--won at least some version of a world title at the professional level.
Tags: Olympic  boxer  Howard  Davis  passes 
Added: 2nd January 2016
Views: 437
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1984 Olympic Boxing Controversy Tate-OSullivan At the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, the light middleweight (71 kg) boxing final featured Frank Tate of the USA and Shawn O'Sullivan of Canada. There have always been controversial decisions in Olympic boxing from the first tournament in 1904. This one infuriated just about everyone outside the USA. Watch the fight with the commentary of Howard Cosell muted and see if you agree with the decision.
Tags: Shawn  OSullivan  Frank  Tate  Olympics  boxing 
Added: 18th December 2017
Views: 252
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1973 Ezzard Charles Muscular Dystrophy PSA Former world heavyweight champion Ezzard Charles, who was afflicted with ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease), is featured in this stark public service announcement from 1973. Charles succumbed to the terrible disease in 1975.
Tags: ALS  Ezzard  Charles  boxing  PSA  muscular  dystrophy 
Added: 20th May 2018
Views: 138
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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