Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
1960 US Olympic Boxing Trials - Clay vs Hudson Few people realize how close Cassius Clay (later Muhammad Ali) was to not qualifying for the 1960 Rome Olympics. In the light heavyweight championship bout of the Olympic boxing trials in San Francisco, Clay faced hard-hitting Allen Hudson of the US Army. In the final round shown in this clip, Hudson floored Clay. Clay immediately rose and connected with a solid right hand that sent Hudson to the canvas. Hudson got up too but he was in no condition to continue. Clay got the Olympic team berth, the gold medal, and became the most famous man on the planet. Hudson, on the other hand, faded into obscurity. He died in 1996 at the age of 60.
Tags: boxing  US  Olympic  trials  1960  Clay  Hudson 
Added: 21st December 2014
Views: 1169
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Boxing at Yankee Stadium - 1923 When New York's Yankee Stadium opened in 1923, it was the most spectacular sports facility of its age. Besides baseball, other events took place at The House That Ruth Built. Here's a photo of a 1923 boxing match--probably one of the preliminary fights on the undercard of the Jess Willard-Floyd Johnson heavyweight bout that attracted 63,000 spectators. (I can't imagine paying for one of those seats far away in the outfield bleachers. You'd be hard pressed to see anything!)
Tags: boxing  1923  Yankee  Stadium 
Added: 8th January 2015
Views: 1190
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mohammed Ali refuses to join the Army Cassius Clay alias Mohammed Ali refuses to join the Army. He won't kill people of his kind in Vietnam. He even risks going to prison when he refused.
Tags: Mohammed  Ali  refuses    join  U.S.  Army  Vietnam  prison  Cassius  Clay  The  Greatest  Boxing  Stripped  of  Title 
Added: 28th April 2015
Views: 609
Rating:
Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Gene Fullmer 1931-2015 One of the familiar names from the golden age of boxing, Gene Fullmer, passed away on April 27, 2015 at the age of 83. He defeated Sugar Ray Robinson for the the world middleweight title in January 1957 before losing the championship back to Robinson in May. Fullmer held at least a portion of the middleweight crown again from 1959 to 1963. Known for his rugged, brawling style, Fullmer was very much a hero in his home state of Utah. A youth center is named after him. His pro record was 55-6-3 with 24 knockouts.
Tags: obituary  Gene  Fullmer  boxing  champion 
Added: 30th April 2015
Views: 665
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Jerry Lewis Boxing In Sailor Beware Tags: Dean  Martin  Jerry  Lewis  Marion  Marshall  Corinne  Calvet  Leif  Erickson  Jerry  Lewis  Boxing  In  Sailor  Beware 
Added: 6th May 2015
Views: 598
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Foreman-Lyle Fight 1976 Many boxing fans consider the 1976 heavyweight fight between George Foreman and Ron Lyle as the most exciting boxing match ever shown on television. I've been following boxing for more than 40 years and it's hard to think of a wilder bout! This was a crossroads fight for both men. Foreman hadn't fought since losing the world heavyweight title to Muhammad Ali in Zaire in October 1974. Lyle had lost to Ali in May 1975. A loss would be a major setback to either man's quest to get another crack at Ali. The fight lasted five rounds, but this video condenses the topsy-turvy events to about six minutes. Howard Cosell and Ken Norton describe the brawl.
Tags: boxing  George  Foreman  Ron  Lyle 
Added: 20th May 2015
Views: 841
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Davey - Boxings First TV Creation Chuck Davey, a slick left-handed boxer from Detroit who earned two degrees from Michigan State University, was the sport's first "television creation" in the early 1950s. Davey traveled to London as a member of the 1948 U.S. Olympic boxing team as an alternate but never competed in the Games. He turned pro in the late 1940s. At a time when boxing was hugely popular and it was possible to watch live televised pro bouts six nights per week, Chuck Davey fit the bill perfectly. He was good-looking, intelligent, popular enough be be pictured twice on the cover of The Ring magazine, and talented enough to win, but he possessed feather fists so his bouts often went the distance or close to it. (This pleased the networks and their sponsors as all the scheduled commercial breaks would be attained.) Over the years the quality of Davey's opposition has been questioned--and he certainly fought his share of tomato cans--but Davey did beat capable fighters such as Ike Williams, Carmen Basilio, and Rocky Graziano in his ascension up the ladder. After compiling 37 wins and two draws in his first 39 fights, Davey earned a shot at Kid Gavilan's world welterweight crown on February 11, 1953 in Chicago. Gavilan, who entered the ring as a 14-5 betting favorite, realized quickly that Davey had no ability to hurt him, so he just methodically wore Davey down. In the third round a flurry of punches knocked Davey down for the first time in his career. Over the next few rounds Gavilan toyed with Davey, occasionally switching to a southpaw stance just for the fun of it. In the ninth round, Gavilan floored Davey three more times. The fight was stopped by Davey's corner before round 10. Davey was pretty much discredited as a title threat after the bad loss to Gavilan. At one point he lost four out of five fights. He won two bouts in 1955 and then retired with an overall pro record of 42-5-2 with 26 knockouts. In 1998, Davey was paralyzed in a swimming mishap when a large ocean wave violently slammed him onto a beach. Davey died in 2002 at age 77.
Tags: boxing  Chuck  Davey  TV 
Added: 28th June 2015
Views: 903
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Rocky Marciano - Last Fight On September 21, 1955 Rocky Marciano defended his world heavyweight championship versus light heavyweight champion Archie Moore. The bout took place at Yankee Stadium. Marciano retired not long afterwards with a perfect 49-0 pro record--something no other heavyweight champion managed to do. Here are highlights from the seventh, eighth, and ninth rounds. Providing the commentary is Rocky Marciano himself!
Tags: boxing  Marciano  Moore   
Added: 6th July 2015
Views: 1279
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
James Scott - Prisoner Boxer One of the most controversial professional athletes in history was James Scott--a light heavyweight boxer who was permitted to pursue a professional ring career from within the confines of a New Jersey state prison. By the time Scott was 28 years old he had spent about half his life in reformatories or prisons. After serving time in Rahway State Prison for robbery, Scott began boxing professionally in Miami under the tutelage of Angelo and Chris Dundee in the mid-1970s. He compiled a record of 11-0-1 before trouble found him again. A car he owned was linked to a robbery and murder. Scott maintained he had merely loaned the car to friends and was utterly unaware of their plans. Law enforcement didn't buy his story and Scott was returned to Rahway prison to serve a 30-year term for parole violation. While there Scott persuaded correctional officials that a prison boxing program would benefit everyone: Prisoners would be able to release their frustrations in an acceptable manner, they could pursue professional careers upon their releases, and the overall camaraderie among all prisoners would be improved. The state thought Scott's idea had merit. Remarkably, they also allowed Scott to resume his pro boxing career--as long as his opponents were willing to fight inside the prison. Scott--whose fitness regimen reputedly included 1,500 push-ups per day--became a force to be reckoned with. He earned a top-10 ranking from the World Boxing Association in an era when the light heavyweight division was very deep. NBC and CBS each aired Scott's bouts. ABC, however, kept its distance from Scott due to his criminal convictions. Scott's biggest win came over Eddie Gregory in 1977. Gregory was the number-one-ranked contender at the time and would eventually win the WBA championship. Whenever a Scott bout was shown on TV there were numerous complaints forwarded to the network from people who did not think an incarcerated person should be allowed to pursue a pro sports career in prison. The rival World Boxing Council agreed and never did rank Scott. Eventually the WBA dropped Scott from its rankings too, largely because he would most likely have to leave Rahway to fight for a championship. With no hope of ever fighting for a title, Scott's career waned. Scott lost two of his last three fights to end his career with a record of 19-2-1. Scott's final bout, a 1981 defeat, came at the hands of Dwight Braxton who would later win world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. Ironically, Braxton had been a former Rahway inmate himself. Scott was finally released from prison in 2005 when he was in his mid-sixties.
Tags: boxing  James  Scott  prisoner 
Added: 6th July 2015
Views: 1004
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Howard Cosell-Alvin Garrett Incident Love him or hate him, Howard Cosell was pretty much the personification of ABC's Monday Night Football from its inception in 1970 through the 1983 season. During the first Monday night game of the 1983 NFL season between the Washington Redskins and the Dallas Cowboys, Howard Cosell made the following comment about diminutive Washington wide receiver Alvin Garrett: "That little monkey sure gets loose, doesn't he?" Immediately Cosell came under fire from a black minister, the Reverend Joseph Lowery of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Lowery called the remark racist and demanded Cosell apologize or be fired. Cosell was stunned by the allegation. He said the term 'little monkey' was a term of endearment--which he often used to describe his own grandchildren. Indeed, anyone who fairly examined Cosell's body of work knew he had supported black athletes time and time again in truly divisive racial disputes. Jesse Jackson and Muhammad Ali both publicly supported Cosell. Garrett himself said he knew that Cosell meant no harm. Someone even found a clip from a preseason football telecast from 1972 in which Cosell referred to Mike Adamle--a small Caucasian player--as "a little monkey." Nevertheless, Cosell's tenure with Monday night football ended without much fanfare at the end of the 1983 season. He covered the boxing tournament at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and not much else afterward. When Cosell was not assigned to work ABC's coverage of the 1985 World Series, it was obvious that ABC had quietly put the aging Cosell--its iconic broadcaster--out to pasture.
Tags: Howard  Cosell  Alvin  Garrett  racism  incident 
Added: 11th July 2015
Views: 902
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 7 8 9 10 11 12 [13] 14 of 14 | Random