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Suzanne Pleshette  Dies Jan 19th 2008  She Will Be Missed Suzanne Pleshette, the husky-voiced star best known for her role as Bob Newhart's sardonic wife, Emily, on television's long-running "The Bob Newhart Show," has died at age 70. Pleshette, whose career included roles in such films as Hitchcock's "The Birds" and in Broadway plays including "The Miracle Worker," died of respiratory failure Saturday evening at her Los Angeles home, said her attorney Robert Finkelstein, also a family friend. Pleshette underwent chemotherapy for lung cancer in 2006. "The Bob Newhart Show, a hit throughout its six-year run, starred comedian Newhart as a Chicago psychiatrist surrounded by eccentric patients. Pleshette provided the voice of reason. Four years after the show ended in 1978, Newhart went on to the equally successful "Newhart" series in which he was the proprietor of a New England inn populated by more eccentrics. When that show ended in 1990, Pleshette reprised her role - from the first show - in one of the most clever final episodes in TV history. It had Newhart waking up in the bedroom of his "The Bob Newhart Show" home with Pleshette at his side. He went on to tell her of the crazy dream he'd just had of running an inn filled with eccentrics. "If I'm in Timbuktu, I'll fly home to do that," Pleshette said of her reaction when Newhart told her how he was thinking of ending the show. Born Jan. 31, 1937, in New York City, Pleshette began her career as a stage actress after attending the city's High School of the Performing Arts and studying at its Neighborhood Playhouse. She was often picked for roles because of her beauty and her throaty voice. "When I was 4," she told an interviewer in 1994, "I was answering the phone, and (the callers) thought I was my father. So I often got quirky roles because I was never the conventional ingenue." She met her future husband, Tom Poston, when they appeared together in the 1959 Broadway comedy "The Golden Fleecing," but didn't marry him until more than 40 years later. Although the two had a brief fling, they went on to marry others. By 2000 both were widowed and they got back together, marrying the following year. "He was such a wonderful man. He had fun every day of his life," Pleshette said after Poston died in April 2007. Among her other Broadway roles was replacing Anne Bancroft in "The Miracle Worker," the 1959 drama about Helen Keller, in New York and on the road. Meanwhile, she had launched her film career with Jerry Lewis in 1958 in "The Geisha Boy." She went on to appear in numerous television shows, including "Have Gun, Will Travel,""Alfred Hitchcock Presents,""Playhouse 90" and "Naked City." By the early 1960s, Pleshette attracted a teenage following with her youthful roles in such films as "Rome Adventure,""Fate Is the Hunter,""Youngblood Hawke" and "A Distant Trumpet." She married fellow teen favorite Troy Donahue, her co-star in "Rome Adventure," in 1964 but the union lasted less than a year. She was married to Texas oilman Tim Gallagher from 1968 until his death in 2000. Pleshette matured in such films as Hitchcock's "The Birds" and the Disney comedies "The Ugly Dachshund,""Blackbeard's Ghost" and "The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin." Over the years, she also had a busy career in TV movies, including playing the title role in 1990's "Leona Helmsley, the Queen of Mean." More recently, she appeared in several episodes of the TV sitcoms "Will & Grace" and "8 Simple Rules ... For Dating My Teenage Daughter." In a 1999 interview, Pleshette observed that being an actress was more important than being a star. "I'm an actress, and that's why I'm still here," she said. "Anybody who has the illusion that you can have a career as long as I have and be a star is kidding themselves."
Tags: suzanne  pleshette  bob  newhart  show    tom  poston  cancer 
Added: 20th January 2008
Views: 1876
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Posted By: Sophia
Kinky Boots Time for the quirky hits again. Here are the original stars of The Avengers, Patrick Macnee and Honor Blackman singing, well I'll let you decide.
Tags: Kinky  Boots  Avengers  Macnee  Blackman  UK  TV 
Added: 31st January 2008
Views: 1282
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Posted By: donmac101
Black Sabbath War Pigs Live Paris 1970 B.B.C.
Tags: black  sabbath  war  pigs  live  paris  1970  ozzy  tony  lommi  geezer  butler  bill  ward   
Added: 31st January 2008
Views: 1214
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Posted By: tommy7
Roy Orbison In Dreams 1963 "In Dreams" is a song composed and sung by American rock and roll performer, Roy Orbison. An operatic ballad of lost love, it was released as a 45rpm single on Monument Records in February 1963. The song's opening line refers to "A candy-colored clown they call the Sandman". The Sandman is a character in Hans Christian Andersen's children stories who brings sleep and dreams by sprinkling magic sand onto the sleeping. It became the title track on the album In Dreams, released July 1963, and also appears on his 1989 posthumous album A Black & White Night Live from the 1988 HBO television special. "In Dreams" was used famously in an infamous whorehouse scene in David Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986). An effeminate drug dealer, played by Dean Stockwell, lip synchs the song at the insistence of a sadistic criminal played by Dennis Hopper. Later, Hopper's character utters the lines "In dreams I talk to you... in dreams you're MINE - all the time!" as he threatens Kyle Maclachlan's character. The song also appeared in and provided the title for Neil Jordan's 1999 psychological thriller In Dreams. If the structure of a standard pop song is ABABCAB (verse-chorus, verse-chorus, bridge, verse-chorus), then the structure of "In Dreams" is ABCDE: the lyrics "A candy-colored clown," "I close my eyes," "In dreams I walk with you," "But just before the dawn," and "It's too bad that all these things" all introduce sections of new musical material that are not repeated. In 1988, songwriters Will Jennings and Richard Kerr wrote a response to "In Dreams", called "In The Real World", which Orbison recorded for his 1989 album Mystery Girl. In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine named "In Dreams" as one of the "500 Greatest Songs of All Time."
Tags: Roy      Orbison      In      Dreams     
Added: 31st January 2008
Views: 1711
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Posted By: geminat
Brown Sugar   Pioneers of Black Entertainment Tags: Brown  Sugar  -    Pioneers  of  Black  Entertainment 
Added: 5th February 2008
Views: 1064
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Posted By: Old Fart
Jack Johnson World Heavyweight Champion The first black boxer to hold the world heavyweight title was Jack Johnson of Galveston, Texas. Johnson held the crown from 1908 through 1915. A superb defensive fighter, he would sometimes go through several rounds without his opponent landing a meaningful punch. When he beat Canada's Tommy Burns for the title in Australia in 1908, correspondent Jack London wrote, 'Not one second of any round could legitimately be scored for Burns.' Johnson so outclassed his opposition that his title reign inspired the Great White Hope movement in America to find someone with the proper pigmentation to beat him. Nat Fleischer, who edited The Ring magazine from 1922 through 1972, rated Johnson as the greatest heavyweight ever.
Tags: Jack  Johnson  heavyweight  champion 
Added: 6th February 2008
Views: 1276
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Posted By: Lava1964
Moses Walker Predated Jackie Robinson Everybody knows that Jackie Robinson was the first black major league baseball player, right? Wrong--by 63 years! Moses Fleetwood (Fleet) Walker, a barehanded catcher, played 42 games for the Toledo Blue Stockings of the American Association way back in 1884 when the AA was a major league. Walker's presence on the team created considerable controversy. Walker was subjected to death threats and snubbed by his own teammates. His brother Welday joined the team for a while too, appearing in five games as an outfielder. However, with owners, players and fans all showing open hostility toward blacks, the major league moguls made a 'gentleman's agreement' not to sign any more black players after 1884. This tacit pact stood until Jackie Robinson took the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers on opening day 1947.
Tags: Moses  Fleetwood  Walker 
Added: 6th February 2008
Views: 1720
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Posted By: Lava1964
i remember mama this is one of the first shows i can remeber seeing on our black and white t.v.
Tags: I  remember  mama 
Added: 1st April 2008
Views: 1377
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Posted By: roseanns1
Fritz Pollard First Black NFL Coach The first black coach in the National Football League was Fritz Pollard who was a player-coach for the Akron Pros during the league's infancy way back in 1921. Pollard lived to a ripe old age: He was 92 when he died in 1986.
Tags: Fritz  Pollard  NFL  coach 
Added: 10th February 2008
Views: 1057
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Posted By: Lava1964
Billy Ripken Baseball Card Obscenity Fleer's 1989 baseball card of Billy Ripken of the Baltimore Orioles had an unusual feature: an obscenity on the handle of his bat. For years Ripken blamed a playful teammate for scribbling the naughty message on his bat just before the photo was taken. In 2009 Ripken fessed up, saying he had written the message on his batting practice bat to distinguish it from his game bats. He had just finished taking BP at Fenway Park when the Fleer photographer snapped this photo. When this error became public knowledge, Fleer reissued Ripken's card several different times, with the offending message blacked out or obscured in a different manner. Predictably, the original 'error card' is much in demand by collectors.
Tags: Billy  Ripken  baseball  card  error 
Added: 10th February 2008
Views: 2058
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Posted By: Lava1964

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