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Hillsborough Disaster - 1989 One of the world's most senseless sporting disasters took place on Saturday, April 15, 1989 at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, England. That afternoon 96 soccer fans were crushed to death before and during the early minutes of an FA Cup semifinal between Liverpool FC and Nottingham Forest FC. The stadium was a neutral site, but Liverpool had thousands more fans than Nottingham Forest who sought tickets. As is the custom, the two teams' fans were segregated. The Liverpool supporters were generally assigned standing-room tickets on the south terraces--enclosures surrounded by security fences. With the Liverpool terraces already dangerously overcrowded, the situation became exponentially worse when the police outside the stadium, fearing trouble, ordered an exit gate to be opened and 2,000 more fans rushed into the enclosures bypassing the turnstiles. The crush of the crowd caused fans already inside to be pushed and squeezed against the heavy metal fences and die of suffocation. Despite the constant pleas from fans for the police to open security gates to alleviate the pressure, the police on the other side of the fences did nothing. Some fans tried to escape by climbing into an upper deck. Others tried to scale the security fences. About six minutes into the match, the fans in the overcrowded terraces spilled over and through the fences causing the game to be stopped. Most of the fatalities died on the pitch without ever getting to a hospital. A coroner's report suggested that perhaps 40 of the fatalities could have been prevented with quick medical attention. Yet only two ambulances ever entered the stadium while others were stuck in a bottleneck outside the venue. Even with injured and dying fans being brought onto the pitch, most police officers were inexplicably more concerned with preventing rival Forest supporters from entering the field than assisting the injured. Initial reports wrongly blamed drunken and unruly fans for the catastrophe while exonerating the police's actions and inactions. Wildly inaccurate stories about fans pickpocketing the dead and interfering with rescue efforts were published in The Sun tabloid--a newspaper which is largely boycotted in Liverpool to this day. Later investigations indicated that a whitewash of the incident was orchestrated by the police, and rightly placed the blame on a paucity of law enforcement outside the stadium and a lack of police action when the situation on the terraces became dangerous. The ages of those killed ranged from 10 to 72. Eighty-nine of the 96 were males. One 10-year-old who died was the cousin of Steven Gerrard, who would later become Liverpool's captain. Terraces disappeared from most large British soccer venues shortly thereafter.
Tags: Hillsborough  disaster  England  soccer   
Added: 12th July 2014
Views: 2650
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Posted By: Lava1964
Toy Fun in the Spiegel Catalog Tags: Toy  Fun  in  the  Spiegel  Catalog  toss  across  rebound  cross  fire  bing  bang  boing 
Added: 25th September 2009
Views: 1422
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Posted By: Cliffy
Richard Speck Murders 1966 On July 13, 1966, one of the most horrific crimes in American history occurred: Eight women aged between 21 and 23 were tortured and killed in a Chicago dormitory by Richard Speck. They were all student nurses who were a month away from graduation. The 24-year-old Speck (pictured here at his trial) was a lifelong felon whose lengthy criminal record included violent sexual assaults. On the night of the murders, Speck systematically killed his victims by strangulation or stabbing over a period of several hours. He also raped the eighth victim. Speck may have lost track of how many women were in the dorm room. A potential ninth victim, Cora Amurao, wriggled out of her bindings and hid under a bed while Speck's killing spree went on in another room. Amurao later identified Speck in court. Speck was found guilty and sentenced to die in the Illinois electric chair. The death sentence was later commuted on constitutional grounds. Instead Speck was given a 1,200-year sentence at Statesville Prison. For years Speck denied having any memories of the killings. However, in a 1978 interview he confessed to remembering everything. In a 1988 prison videotape, Speck was seen partying with fellow prisoners who were high on illegal drugs. The video recorded Speck mocking his victims. Portions of the video were broadcast nationally in 1996, increasing the support for capital punishment. By that time Speck was dead; he had died of a heart attack in prison on December 5, 1991, a day before his 50th birthday. No family member came forward to claim his body.
Tags: Richard  Speck  murderer 
Added: 23rd November 2009
Views: 4503
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Posted By: Lava1964
PEARL HARBOR ATTACK SCENE Original pearl harbor attack scene from 2001 movie YOUR WELCOME!
Tags: pearl    harbor    bombing    japan    attack    wwii    boats    bombs  special  effects 
Added: 7th December 2009
Views: 2969
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Posted By: Old Fart
Bing Crosby sings Do You Hear What I Hear The legendary Bing Crosby performs a stellar rendition of "Do You Hear What I Hear?" during an early 1960s television Christmas special.
Tags: Bing  Crosby  Christmas  carol  vocal  song  performance  1960s  holiday  Do  you  hear  what  I  hear 
Added: 24th December 2009
Views: 1481
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Posted By: robatsea
Eery Boxing Photo 1913 This is one of my favorite sports photographs. It isn't a particularly great photo--in fact, it's quite poor from a photography standpoint--but is does show an eery ray of sunlight breaking through the clouds to illuminate the prone Luther McCarty. The date was May 24, 1913. McCarty, a 21-year-old 'white hope' from Nebraska, was being groomed for a chance to meet Jack Johnson for the world heavyweight title. McCarty had already beaten a couple of top contenders. He was pitted against lightly regarded Arthur Pelkey in Calgary, Alberta as a keep-busy fight. To everyone's shock, McCarty collapsed in the first round after absorbing a very light punch from Pelkey. (Some reports say it landed on McCarty's body; others claim in struck his head.) Regardless, it wasn't a very hard punch. McCarty dropped to the canvas unconscious and never rose. The crowd booed, believing the fight was fixed. It wasn't. McCarty had died of a brain hemorrhage. It was likely caused by a fall from a horse a few days earlier that his managers had kept secret from sports writers. Writers and fans alike agreed the strange ray of light only illuminated the spot where McCarty lay dying--and nowhere else in the ring.
Tags: Luther  McCarty  boxing  fatality  photo 
Added: 17th January 2010
Views: 2960
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Posted By: Lava1964
End of Western Union Telegrams 2006 On January 27, 2006, Western Union ended more than 150 years of telegram service. Beginning in 1854, the company began transmitting and transcribing telegraphed messages and delivering them to customers across the country. They heyday of the telegram was in the 1920s and 1930s when sending a message by telegraph was cheaper than making a long-distance telephone call. The word 'stop' was commonly used in the text of telegrams to end a sentence instead of a period because it was cheaper to send a four-letter word than a punctuation mark. Telegrams were often used for formal notifications and announcements, such as the one below to inform the recipient that he would share the 1958 Nobel Prize for Medicine/Physiology. During the Second World War, Western Union couriers were feared because they delivered official death notices to the families of servicemen. Eventually technology made telegrams obsolete and anachronistic. Only about 20,000 telegrams were sent in 2005, mostly by companies that were required to send legal notifications. On that final day of service, ten telegrams were delivered. They included a congratulatory message, a sympathy message, and, of course, a handful of messages from people who were trying to make history by sending the final Western Union telegram. Today Western Union exists only as a company that handles money transfers.
Tags: last  telegram  Western  Union  communications 
Added: 9th March 2010
Views: 3209
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Posted By: Lava1964
Oorang Indians The Oorang Indians were a travelling team in the National Football League from LaRue, Ohio (near Marion). The team was named after the Oorang dog kennels. It was basically a novelty team put together by the kennels' owner, Walter Lingo, for marketing purposes. All the players were Native Americans, with Jim Thorpe as its star. The Indians played the 1922 and 1923 NFL seasons. Of the 20 games they played over those two seasons, only one was played at 'home' in nearby Marion, OH. Only four games were won by the team. With a population well under 1,000 people, LaRue is easily the smallest town ever to have been the home of an NFL franchise. The Indians were the first NFL team to have a halftime show. (It featured the kennels' dogs.) The team's owner was not too concerned about fielding a competitive squad--and it showed. Discipline was lax on road trips and the players routinely engaged in heavy drinking binges at speakeasies. In one famous incident in St. Louis, the Indians commandeered a trolley car to get them back to their hotel. Since the trolley was headed in the wrong direction, the players simply lifted it, and turned it around on the tracks.
Tags: football  Oorang  Indians  NFL 
Added: 22nd January 2011
Views: 1223
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Posted By: Lava1964
Confidential Magazine Confidential was a periodical published quarterly from December 1952 to August 1953, and then bi-monthly until 1978. It was founded by Robert Harrison and is considered a pioneer in scandal, gossip, and exposÚ journalism. Newsweek said Confidential focused on 'sin and sex with a seasoning of right wing politics.' Its journalism consisted of equal parts of innuendo and exposÚs. For example, the magazine alleged that Bing Crosby was a wife beater and that Rock Hudson and Liberace were homosexuals (It referred to them as 'Lavender Lads.'). It also revealed that Robert Mitchum had been charged with smoking marijuana. Apart from spreading gossip and outing homosexuals, Confidential combined its exposÚs with a conservative agenda especially targeted at those who sympathised with the political left and at celebrities that it claimed were engaged in 'miscegenation.' Humphrey Bogart described the publication's popularity: 'Everybody reads it--but they say the cook brought it into the house.' Comedian Groucho Marx once wrote to Confidential's editor, 'If you don't stop writing nasty things about me, I'll be forced to cancel my subscription.'
Tags: scandal  gossip  Confidential  magazine 
Added: 23rd February 2011
Views: 1672
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Posted By: Lava1964
Queen For A Day Total Television calls Queen For A Day, '...possibly the most maudlin game show ever broadcast'--and for good reason. Considered a forerunner of modern-day reality TV, QFAD was a successful radio program beginning in 1945 before airing on daytime television from 1956 through 1964. At the peak of the show's popularity in the late 1950s, NBC expanded it from 30 to 45 minutes to sell more commercials, at a then-premium rate of $4,000 per minute. QFAD opened with host Jack Bailey asking the largely female studio audience, 'Would YOU like to be queen for a day?' After this, the contestants were introduced and interviewed. Each contestant talked about recent financial and emotional hard times she had been through. The sob stories were rated on an applause meter. Bailey began each interview gently, asking the contestant first about her life and family, and maintaining a positive and upbeat response no matter what she told him. The interview climaxed with Bailey asking the contestant what she needed most and why she wanted to win the title of Queen for a Day. Often the request was for medical care or therapeutic equipment to help a chronically ill child, but sometimes it was as simple as the need for a hearing aid, a new washing machine, or a refrigerator. Many women broke down sobbing as they described their plights, and Bailey was always quick to comfort them and offer a clean white handkerchief to dry their eyes. The more pitiful the story a contestant had, the likelier the studio audience was to reach the applause meter's highest level. The winner, to the musical accompaniment of Pomp and Circumstance, would be draped in a sable-trimmed red velvet robe, given a glittering jeweled crown to wear, placed on a velvet-upholstered throne, and handed a dozen long-stemmed roses to hold as she wept, often uncontrollably, while her list of prizes was announced. The prizes began with the necessary help the woman had requested, but might include a vacation, a night on the town with her husband or escort, silver-plated flatware, an array of kitchen appliances, and a selection of fashion clothing. The losing contestants were each given smaller prizes; no one went away from the show without a meaningful gift. Bailey's trademark sign-off was 'This is Jack Bailey, wishing we could make every woman a queen--for every single day!' A 1970 short-lived syndicated revival of QFAD quickly fell into disfavor with viewers when it was revealed the 'contestants' were actually actresses.
Tags: Queen  For  A  Day  reality  TV  game  show 
Added: 24th February 2011
Views: 1802
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Posted By: Lava1964

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